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1984 Rally - Improvements For 2012


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veerji ignore comments you dont like. you dont have to pick a fight on every discussion. we dont know who has enough kirpa to fight for panth.. do you? do i? we dont know...!! there is nothing wrong with conversing in english and there is nothing wrong with being pendhu..

people that think they are too good for "fobs" are wrong and people that think they are better than those conversing in english are wrong as well!!

we need to be open mided and bring out issues that affect our panth and collectively DO something about those issues!! in order to collectively do something about those issues we need to stand together and i am sure thats not going to happen by fighting over small things..!! :)

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here are my views :

1. there needed to be more banners, as this is more striking to the public than a group of people. Also the banners need to be on the edge of the walkers, by the footpath, so people can read the banners as they walk towards you on 1 side, and as they drive past on the other side.

I saw many people reading my banner, and also there were many people taking fotos of it.

2. Our personal display means a lot. We are walking in memeory of thousands of victims of tyranny, yet smiling and drinking coffee, or eating ice creams, having a giggle as we walk down the road. What are the public to think? Also people walking on the footpath, when they should be in the road.

3. keep the marchers only 4 or 6 abreast, so we take up more road space, and this makes it seem like there are more marchers than there reallyu are.

4. There has to be something striking right at the front, like the coffins we had some years ago.

5. Dont use any visual aids that come apart easily. Before the walk little flags were being handed out, but as I walked down the road, some of them had ripped and people were stepping on them.

6. Promote the mindset that this is not an opportunity to see London, but to help the world see our pain.

Chatanga

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6. Promote the mindset that this is not an opportunity to see London, but to help the world see our pain.

This is a really valid point. It's important that this event is not seen as a "mela" as such. You can't help but feel some of us have started coming with the wrong mindset to this annual event.

Some of our Sikh attendees from out of town felt it more important to climb on the lions at Traflagar Square and have their pictures taken like tourists whilst a group of our kids brought a football to the rally to kick around the side of Trafalagar square which lead to some complaints from the Police about "public safety". We can't afford to let the profile of the event be demeaned by our usual punjabi pendupauna. Whilst we can give constructive feedback to the organisers, each of us has a large part to play in the collective behaviour and conduct of our own sangat. Perhaps a brief needs to be communicated to the sangat in advance (the coach for instance) to remind us why were are gathering in London and the emotion we are trying to portray.

Also regarding the banners and placards, a lot of the placard sewa was taken on by Guru Har Rai Sahib Gurdwara and Guru Nanak Gurdwara West Brom. More and more Guru ghars/individuals need to take the innovative step to produce placards and banners for distribution in the sangat, particularly as the event turnout seems to be getting larger.

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6. Promote the mindset that this is not an opportunity to see London, but to help the world see our pain.

This is a really valid point. It's important that this event is not seen as a "mela" as such. You can't help but feel some of us have started coming with the wrong mindset to this annual event.

Some of our Sikh attendees from out of town felt it more important to climb on the lions at Traflagar Square and have their pictures taken like tourists whilst a group of our kids brought a football to the rally to kick around the side of Trafalagar square which lead to some complaints from the Police about "public safety". We can't afford to let the profile of the event be demeaned by our usual punjabi pendupauna. Whilst we can give constructive feedback to the organisers, each of us has a large part to play in the collective behaviour and conduct of our own sangat. Perhaps a brief needs to be communicated to the sangat in advance (the coach for instance) to remind us why were are gathering in London and the emotion we are trying to portray

I would actually disagree with that and I hope thats not a policy that is introduced next year because if it is.....I reckon the turnout in future years will be a fraction of what we saw on Sunday. Think about it......these people.....are everyday normal people...normal sikhs. Family people with kids. They gave up whatever they had to do on Sunday to come. Some of them gave up a days wages at work to come. And yet now we want to tell them not to smile ?

And what do you think the average member of the public would make of 50,000 miserable depressed looking people going past ? Do you really think that will make them want to engage with us.....talk to us etc ? No.....its human nature to turn your head and run a mile from morose people. And are you forgetting what the public like about us sikhs anyway ? We're universally loved and respected precicely because they see us a nice, friendly approachable people. If we achieve our objective and make the public want to go home and read up about sikhs.....they will read in their books how Sikhs face death with a smile and laughter......How sikhs always stay in high cheerfull spirits. Are so brave and so overjoyed that their loved ones have joined in union with god they don't even cry at their funerals. How is that ideal gonna fit in with the sight of 50,000 depressed faces ?

You guys are so eager to make next year even better that you've started to fix things that ain't even broke. Only 2 things were wrong on sunday. Firstly, the very predicatble really really really bad signs / placards. And secondly, at Trafalgar Square, we could have had the attention of the world. London is not Toronto or Vancouver......When things happen in London it makes news in every part of the globe. We could have had the attention of the world but instead we had sounds, music etc that can hardly be described as easy on the ear. Sounds that made our target audience cover their ears and move away as quick as possible. Fix the things that are broke. But don't go fixing things that don't need fixing.

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I would actually disagree with that and I hope thats not a policy that is introduced next year because if it is.....I reckon the turnout in future years will be a fraction of what we saw on Sunday. Think about it......these people.....are everyday normal people...normal sikhs. Family people with kids. They gave up whatever they had to do on Sunday to come. Some of them gave up a days wages at work to come. And yet now we want to tell them not to smile ?

And what do you think the average member of the public would make of 50,000 miserable depressed looking people going past ? Do you really think that will make them want to engage with us.....talk to us etc ? No.....its human nature to turn your head and run a mile from morose people. And are you forgetting what the public like about us sikhs anyway ? We're universally loved and respected precicely because they see us a nice, friendly approachable people. If we achieve our objective and make the public want to go home and read up about sikhs.....they will read in their books how Sikhs face death with a smile and laughter......How sikhs always stay in high cheerfull spirits. Are so brave and so overjoyed that their loved ones have joined in union with god they don't even cry at their funerals. How is that ideal gonna fit in with the sight of 50,000 depressed faces ?

You guys are so eager to make next year even better that you've started to fix things that ain't even broke. Only 2 things were wrong on sunday. Firstly, the very predicatble really really really bad signs / placards. And secondly, at Trafalgar Square, we could have had the attention of the world. London is not Toronto or Vancouver......When things happen in London it makes news in every part of the globe. We could have had the attention of the world but instead we had sounds, music etc that can hardly be described as easy on the ear. Sounds that made our target audience cover their ears and move away as quick as possible. Fix the things that are broke. But don't go fixing things that don't need fixing.

Ok. Perhaps my post seemed more harsh and critical then it was intended to be. Point taken!

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youngster should be given more chance specially AISSF president Parmjit Singh Gazi his speech at this rally was very short but he raise they very important issues, he talk about future and what we can do in future to achieve our goal. That guy has done great work in india, we should give him chance to be recognised at international level, he is young and capable what u need so badly in our leadership

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