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2012 - A Message Of Hope.


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The pace is quickening and it's more important now (as it always has been) to start building our Sikhi jeevans. People are beginning to question their existence in the world and Sikhs should help guide humanity.

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Bertrand Russell (Philosopher, Mathematician 1872-1970)

If some lucky men survive the onslaught of the third world war of atomic and hydrogen bombs, then the Sikh religion will be the only means of guiding them. When asked, isn’t this religion capable of guiding mankind before the third world war? He said, ‘Yes it has the capability, but the Sikhs haven’t brought out in the broad daylight the splendid doctrines of this religion, which has come into existence for the benefit of the entire mankind. This is their greatest sin and the Sikhs cannot be freed of it.'

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Pearl S. Buck Noble Laureate, ‘Good Earth’

while giving her comments on the English translation of the Guru Granth Sahib (From the foreword to the English translation of Guru Granth Sahib by Gopal Singh Dardi) wrote:

"I have studied the scriptures of the great religions, but I do not find elsewhere the same power of appeal to the heart and mind as I find here in these volumes. They are compact in spite of their length and are a revelation of the concept of God to the recognition and indeed the insistence upon the practical needs of the human body. There is something strangely modern about these scriptures and this puzzled me until I learned that they are in fact comparatively modern, compiled as late as the 16th century when explorers were beginning to discover the globe upon which we all live is a single entity divided only by arbitrary lines of our making. Perhaps this sense of unity is the source of power I find in these volumes. They speak to a person of any religion or of none. They speak for the human heart and the searching mind.

The hymns in Guru Granth are an expression of man’s loneliness, his aspirations, his longings, his cry to God and his hunger for communication with that being. It speaks to me of life and death; of time and eternity; of temporal human body and its needs; of the mystic human soul and its longing to be fulfilled; of God and the indissoluble bond between them."

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Max Arthur Macauliffe

This eminent scholar has written six books on Sikh history. He addresses the Western Six books on Sikh history. He addresses the Western Society and claims to bring Sikh religion from the East which is simple to understand. There is no place to pretence and hypocritical in this religion…..

Flesh, Alcohol Tobacco and other drugs are prohibited in it…. It nor only teachers kindness, love, honesty but also encourages its followers to accept all human beings as one thus diminishing all racial differences…. Teachings of Buddha and other religious were written when they were no more in this world. But teachings of Sikh Guru’s is written and edited by themselves, thus they are found in their original forms.

Battles fought by Sikh Gurus were not against any communalism and orthodoxy but they fought for the betterment of society, to protect people from tyranny and for the upliftment of their souls.

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In his book, "The Sikh Religion," Macauliffe writes:

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"Unlike the scriptures of other creeds, they do not contain love stories or accounts of wars waged for selfish considerations. They contain sublime truths, the study of which cannot but elevate the reader spiritually, morally, and socially. There is not the least tinge of sectarianism in them. They teach the highest and purest principle that serve to bind man to man and inspire the believer with an ambition to serve his fellow men, to sacrifice all and die for their sake."

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Macauliffe deems it necessary to draw the reader's attention to another significant feature of Sikhism which distinguishes it and separates it from other philosophical and religious systems of thought:

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"The Sikh religion differs as regards the authenticity of its dogmas from most other great theological systems. Many of the great teachers the world has known, have not left a line of their own composition, and we only know what they taught through tradition or second-hand information. If Pythagoras wrote any of tenets, his writings have not descended to us. We know the teachings of Socrates only through the writings of Plato and Xenophon. Buddha has left no written memorials of his teaching. Kungfu-tze, known to Europeans as Confucious, left no documents in which he detailed the principles of his moral and social systems. The Founder of Christianity did not reduce his doctrines to writing, and for them we are obliged to trust to the Gospels according to Matthew, Mark. Luke, and John.

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The Arabian Prophet did not himself reduce to writing the chapters of the Quran. They were written or compiled by his adherents and followers. But the compositions of the Sikh Gurus are preserved and we know first hand what they taught. They employed the vehicle of verse, which is generally unalterable by copyist, and we even become in time familiar with their different styles. No spurious compositions or extraneous dogmas, can therefore be represented as theirs.

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The author of the 'Vie de Jesus' was a great admirer of Jesus Christ. Greatly impressed as he was of the spiritual message delivered by Christ and those of the Semitic thinkers that preceded him, he posed the question: "Whether great originality will again arise or the world be content to follow the paths opened by the daring creators of the ancient ages?" Bearing Sikhism in mind, Macauliffe answers the above question in the following words:

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Now there is here a religion totally unaffected by Semite or Christian influences. Based on the concept of the unity of God, it rejected Hindu formalities and adopted an independent ethical system, ritual, and standards, which were totally opposed to the theological beliefs of Guru Nanak’s age and country. As we shall see hereafter, it would be difficult to point to a religion of greater originality or a more comprehensive ethical system."

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Macauliffe continues:

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"Guru Nanak was not a priest either by birth or education, but a man who soared to the loftiest heights of divine emotionalism, and exalted his mental vision to an ethical ideal beyond the concept of Hinduism or Mohammadanism.

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It (Sikhism) prohibits idolatry, hypocrisy, caste exclusiveness, con-cremation (Satti) of widows, the immurement (confinement) of women (like Muslims), the use of wine and other intoxicants, tobacco smoking, infanticide, slander, pilgrimage to the sacred rivers and tanks of the Hindus. It inculcates loyalty, justice, impartiality, truth, honesty and all the moral and domestic virtues to holiest citizens of any country. "

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Arnold Toynbee, a historian

One of the prominent historians in the 20th Century, Amold has written 20 volumes on World History. Arnold has given very high and prominent place to Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji in Sikh History. He calls Guru Ji as divinity of highest rank. He gets emotional when he writes about Guru Sahib’s contribution in the formation of Khalsa. Again & again he emphasizes the fact that there can not be any person like them.

When Western organizations and U.N.O. became known to Sri Guru Granth Sahib’s teachings, they at once decided to translate them into English and other languages. The decided to publish a book based on the principles and teachings of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji. For writing the prologue of this book, they did not find any one more intelligent, intensive and sensible than Toynbee. Since Toynbee had a deep knowledge regarding different societies religions and principles so this task was assigned to him. No one could write better than him. Toynbee in his prologue to this book has clearly mentioned that there can not be better guide to humans as compare to Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji. This book also explains how Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji inspire its followers to do their best, give knowledge and deep insight to them in the name of the God and yet God is an imagined as a word only, hence no worshipping, nothing at all. God is an imagined word which inspire his followers for good deeds.

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Toynbee in his sacred writings of the Sikhs—A Unesco Publications explains, “Although the future of religion is bleak but yet one hope is there in the form of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji which teaches us all God’s message of love and gives direction to life."

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Swami Nitya Nand, author of Guru Gyan

Swami Nitya Nand (expired at the age of 135 years) writes in his book Guru Gyan:

"I, in the company of my Guru Swami Brahma Nanda, while on a pilgrimage tour, reached Punjab. There we met Swami Satya Nanda, Udaasi (a Hindu ascetic) He expounded Guru Nanak’s philosophy and religiosity so eloquently that Swami Brahma Nanda experienced spiritual bliss. During the visit to the Golden temple in Amritsar his soul was so impressed that he became Guru’s devotee. After sojourn in Punjab we went to Hardwar. One day I saw tears in his eyes, though he was healthy. When asked about it he answered, "I have sifted sand all my life. The truth dwells in the house of Guru Nanak. I have to take another birth in that house then only I will attain Mukti (salvation). As he said that his spirit passed away.

I too contemplate incessantly on Wahéguru (wonderful God) as manifested by Guru Nanak. For many years I practiced Yoga Aasnas taught by Yogis, but the rapture and serenity I feel now was never attained before. "[/left]

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Will anybody listen?

What really annoys me about some Sikhs (certainly those in the UK as I can't speak for any of our Canadian and American brothers and sisters) is when these same people underestimate Sikhi and throw it into the pile of 'organised religion' with the rest of them. But then I look at the people who purport to represent the faith and I think to myself "Well no wonder people are being dissuaded from our religion if you're meant to be the best we've got".

The more I look into our faith and begin to learn of it's doctrines on a deeper level, the more I'm beginning to realise that the 'modern' interpretation of Sikhi is very much about the things that the likes of Bluck, Russell and Toynbee were waxing lyrical Sikhi wasn't about!

I'll be frank (possibly more than I should be there you go) but I personally I find the numerous school of thoughts, the sampradhiyas, the jathebandiya to be completely overwhelming. Nevermind about wondering whether Sikhi is the right way (it is, if Guru Granth Sahib Ji is your only guide - this much I do know) but which sub-group within Sikhi espouses the true way as prescribed by our Gurus? Which form of Sikhi was their ideal vision and the one I should be following today? A person worries whether they'll be punished for following a certain branch of Sikhi by overlooking another branch of the faith. I know, this may sound quite childish but just reading the myriad of topics on doctrine (on this site) does that to a person who is attempting to breach the surface (in terms of wishing to progress in their learning about the faith) and therefore whose mind is still in the process of absorbing and learning.

Anyway, I am glad Guru Granth Sahib Ji and Dasme Paatshah's Gurbani is the resolute, irremovable truth and no matter how my mind flounders and thrashes, I can always find solace in the 'charan' of our Guru.

I know for a fact these these thoughts and concerns are shared by many other Sikhs finding their way, but unfortunately they see the roadblocks in their path and turn away. I do not have the luxury of turning away as I have nothing to turn to. Hence my desire to get to the heart of the situation. But yes, there is something supremely special about 2012 so far in terms of spirituality. I wish all of my Sikh brothers and sisters of varying levels of adherence (or even none at all) find something of value in our faith, and I hope they discover that Sikhi is more than just a religion to follow blindly and dogmatically, but it is a system which is of vital importance to our daily survival as something as elementary as breathing is.

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Will anybody listen?

What really annoys me about some Sikhs (certainly those in the UK as I can't speak for any of our Canadian and American brothers and sisters) is when these same people underestimate Sikhi and throw it into the pile of 'organised religion' with the rest of them. But then I look at the people who purport to represent the faith and I think to myself "Well no wonder people are being dissuaded from our religion if you're meant to be the best we've got".

Completely agree and I think it's more of a thing that occurs around the world. Many atheist/agnostics do regard meditation or yoga as good but that's all they think of it. They classify Sikhi along with other world religions (islam, christianity or even Buddhism), mainly because they don't feel there is anything new to see, mainly because the version of Sikhi they receive is what their textbooks (or western sources say Sikh belief system is). There are many problems inside the panth but what I've seen is many more gems as of late. It can get daunting when you see all the problems in the panth but if you acknowledge them and focus on the positives (that are there) it helps focus and guide us into a more positive outlook that will draw a better future.

Our goal should be to be open minded educated Sikhs who have knowledge of many different schools of thought but are "nethark" in our Sikhi. Drawing bridges among humanity is what Sikhs should be doing, regardless whether the person is a Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Atheist, Agnostic.

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HAHAHA ^ those quotes above can be find nowhere except on sikhism sites !

I doubt whether those great minds ever said anything positive about sikhism ( hell , did bertrand russel even knew about sikhism ? lolz) when they criticized other faiths !

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Will anybody listen?

I'll be frank (possibly more than I should be there you go) but I personally I find the numerous school of thoughts, the sampradhiyas, the jathebandiya to be completely overwhelming. Nevermind about wondering whether Sikhi is the right way (it is, if Guru Granth Sahib Ji is your only guide - this much I do know) but which sub-group within Sikhi espouses the true way as prescribed by our Gurus? Which form of Sikhi was their ideal vision and the one I should be following today? A person worries whether they'll be punished for following a certain branch of Sikhi by overlooking another branch of the faith.

Anyway, I am glad Guru Granth Sahib Ji and Dasme Paatshah's Gurbani is the resolute, irremovable truth and no matter how my mind flounders and thrashes, I can always find solace in the 'charan' of our Guru.

Totally agree with you !!! It's almost like there's no option for anybody to follow Sikhi, but instead, only a group within Sikhi can be followed. I think Bhai Balwant Singh Rajoana has given us the answer, we all need to follow and support the Akaal Takht, under one Nishan Sahib!

From being one of the toughest people on the planet we have become one of the softest. We are too frightened to even discuss (and especially debate) what the true path and Maryada is as prescribed by our Gurus! Everytime somebody asks these questions, or tries to question a sampradhiya's or jathebandi's Maryada, or even ask when the Maryada was introduced, i.e. was it after the time of Guru Gobind Singh Ji Maharaaj we are told not to start any trouble and just let everyone follow what they are happy with. I know Guru Gobind Singh Ji Maharaaj built in all that the 9 Gurus espoused before him into his final Maryada, and gave us our Guru Granth Sahib Ji as our only final Guru for eternity. I know that the Nihangs followed Guru Gobind Singh Ji's Maryada, the Sikhs under Bhai Mani Singh also did, the learned Sikhs under Baba Deep Singh did too, so did the Singhs at Hazoor Sahib. I do think, however, that we need to question the sampradhiya's or jathebandi's that started long after Guru Gobind Singh Ji return to Sachkand, and especially question the Maryada those later sampradhiya's or jathebandi's have added or taken away from that left for us all by the 10 Gurus. Until we are allowed to question those additions and ommissions Sikhs will never progress as then these knew sampradhiya's or jathebandi's will not only never have to explain what they have added or omitted to 10 Guru's Maryada, they will be able to keep it secret from the unsuspecting new or unlearned Sikhs they drag into their sampradhiya's or jathebandi's

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Our goal should be to be open minded educated Sikhs who have knowledge of many different schools of thought but are "nethark" in our Sikhi. Drawing bridges among humanity is what Sikhs should be doing, regardless whether the person is a Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Atheist, Agnostic.

Exactly. Obviously I have no time for anyone of other faiths who seek to undermine and attack Sikhi to further their own faith's reputation and standing. But for those people who love God whatever your creed and you just want to get on with people in life, then I honestly don't feel like looking down upon, judging or criticising such people because they may actually have a better and truer connection to God than myself. The same goes for my Sikh brothers and sisters whichever part of the journey they're currently on.

@ 11Guru1Jot - Brilliant post and I agree with you. But the brave manner of tackling such issues as highlighted by yourself boggles the mind and, let's be honest, the path to making a lot of enemies. Nobody wants to be proven wrong, nobody want's their band of men to be discredited or criticised. That's why I worry that some people are more concerned with not losing face rather than doing what is true to the Guru. Anyway, these issues are too complex for the likes of us and are the preserve of a greater calibre of man than I will ever be. Our job is to follow and if there is no one amongst men who will provide that leadership then, like I said before, our Guru is always there for us.

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Anyway, these issues are too complex for the likes of us and are the preserve of a greater calibre of man than I will ever be. Our job is to follow and if there is no one amongst men who will provide that leadership then, like I said before, our Guru is always there for us.

Absolutely right! Siri Guru Granth Sahib Ji Maharaaj is always there for us. Bhai Balwant Singh Rajoana can provide that leadership. We should all work hard to get him out of prison, and not just forget about what he did for the nation. I probably sound a bit 'last month' mentioning Bhai Balwant Singh Rajoana. However, if I had told everyone on the 29th March 2012 that Bhai Balwant Singh Rojoana was just a fad, for a month, nobody would have believed me. Bhai Balwant Singh Rajoana has given us 17 years of his life, and counting. Question is, how much time can we now give to campaign for the release of Bhai Balwant Singh Rajoana and all the other prisoners of conscience rotting in India's jails??

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I probably sound a bit 'last month' mentioning Bhai Balwant Singh Rajoana.

Definitely not. It may seem that the 'Rajoana Topic' is yesterday's news but those with dardh for Sikhi and our homeland are still keeping themselves abreast of issues regarding Bhai Sahib. Like I said in a long rant / post last month, Bhai Sahib has been the catalyst for many Sikhs such as myself to move forward. We must keep our eye on the prize even though - for us Sikhs living so far from where the "action" is - most people's focus may have shifted elsewhere.

@ garch - I'd be done by Ofcom if I was allowed near a television camera. I'm much calmer when I have time to think and type. In person I'd want to rip somebody's head off. :biggrin2:

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HAHAHA ^ those quotes above can be find nowhere except on sikhism sites !

I doubt whether those great minds ever said anything positive about sikhism ( hell , did bertrand russel even knew about sikhism ? lolz) when they criticized other faiths !

What is there to laugh about? Keep your stupid doubts to your small self.

Negativity is your second nature, so how could hear anything positive about Sikhism.

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HAHAHA ^ those quotes above can be find nowhere except on sikhism sites !

I doubt whether those great minds ever said anything positive about sikhism ( hell , did bertrand russel even knew about sikhism ? lolz) when they criticized other faiths !

Although I agree there aren't any sources for those quotes, I don't understand why we would even need quotes from them..picture them next to Sant Jarnail Singh and Bhai Sahib Randhir Singh, they can't even compare to their great minds!

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Although I agree there aren't any sources for those quotes, I don't understand why we would even need quotes from them..picture them next to Sant Jarnail Singh and Bhai Sahib Randhir Singh, they can't even compare to their great minds!

That's why the thread-starter posted those quotes. We know about Sant Jarnail Singh Ji, but Dave Smiley down the road would see a militant with a turban and beard when looking at Sant Ji. Dave would dismiss Sant Jarnail Singh without even wishing to learn what he had to say. If he see's intellectual heavyweights (and let's be honest, white people with no affiliation to the Sikh faith) being favourable to the Sikh religion and it's doctrines then he's more likely to sit up and take notice.

Let's be clear: We don't need the white man to approve our doctrines and our ways. But some of our people, especially the generation I belong to and those younger than myself have a tendency to place a lot of stock in what learned white people say. Maybe it's an inferiority issue?

I and many others are mature enough not to equate the message (whatever it may be) with somebody's outward appearance. But most people are not and they occasionally need something to be shown to them in a language and form they will understand and respect.

It works both ways. If we are more likely to listen to one of our own when it comes to matters of faith and life itself, then the average white person is also going to take heed of what his own is saying.

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That's why the thread-starter posted those quotes. We know about Sant Jarnail Singh Ji, but Dave Smiley down the road would see a militant with a turban and beard when looking at Sant Ji. Dave would dismiss Sant Jarnail Singh without even wishing to learn what he had to say. If he see's intellectual heavyweights (and let's be honest, white people with no affiliation to the Sikh faith) being favourable to the Sikh religion and it's doctrines then he's more likely to sit up and take notice.

Let's be clear: We don't need the white man to approve our doctrines and our ways. But some of our people, especially the generation I belong to and those younger than myself have a tendency to place a lot of stock in what learned white people say. Maybe it's an inferiority issue?

I and many others are mature enough not to equate the message (whatever it may be) with somebody's outward appearance. But most people are not and they occasionally need something to be shown to them in a language and form they will understand and respect.

It works both ways. If we are more likely to listen to one of our own when it comes to matters of faith and life itself, then the average white person is also going to take heed of what his own is saying.

Not Necessarily- I've spoken to many white people and most if not all are floored by what we (Me and God) teach. You can take a huge white trucker guy and pierce his heart with the Truth, for God sits in each heart- look how Guru Nanak Ji pierced the Hirda of Sajjan Thug, a serial killer- He stirred the hearts of hardcore Hindus and Muslims with the Truth.

A white person, no matter how cultured- is God in another image- the Truth(God- as God's name is Sat as described in Mool Mantar) is in his heart, it just needs a little stirring again. When the Truth is taught, it sticks- no matter how much the other persons reaction may make us think it hasn't.

We are all One, even the murderer and the devil and our greatest slanderers act according to His Hukam- according to Truth- for they Are him they've just got to realise it... We are the light and the dark, the unconditional love that we have for even our greatest slanderers is the same love that God has for All.

This is Nirboah and Nirvair- a fearlessness to accept that All is him, no matter how much he beats us and has us slandered(hukam), and Nirvair- being All loving, regardless of his different images(whether dark or light).

The fact is that we DO judge according to image, for the entire creation is God, but we see it to be different- we lack respect and humility to accept hukam, to accept the game that he plays around us as Perfect and as deserved according to our deeds, and to teach all without judgement regardless of the false images of race, culture, gender and overall false identity.

We should love the devil and the angel, the murderer and the saint, for all is Him/ Hukam- all are at different levels of self discovery, playing their part in the khel as He wills it. Who are we to judge when it's Him that pulls the strings- He Always knows Best.

We are asked to accept the Hukam of his command in Gurbani, this is it- All is Hukam- All is Truth/ Him. Hukam/Him/Truth is our Keeper.

When we fully believe this within ourselves, teaching the Truth to our beloved in different forms can become so heartfelt. Fearlessness ensues, and we see the cultured and perhaps racist white man as our brother, as God and ourself in another image, who is at a deserved level of self discovery- we teach him openly without hesitation or reluctance due to ego and the illusion of segregation- no matter how sourly he may react.

We never commit a lie to others, not even a white lie and we don't lie to ourselves(a huge psychological problem people have in maya). We may face death, but we never forsake Truth- We Glorify it as our Gurus and Brahmgyanis(asians and non asians alike) before us did.

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Not Necessarily- I've spoken to many white people who are floored by what we (Me and God) teach. You can take a huge white trucker guy and pierce his heart with the Truth, for God sits in each heart- look how Guru Nanak Ji pierced the Hirda of Sajjan Thug, a serial killer- He stirred the hearts of hardcore Hindus and Muslims with the Truth.

A white person, no matter how cultured- is God in another image- the Truth(God- as God's name is Sat as described in Mool Mantar) is in his heart, it just needs a little stirring again.

We are all One, even the murderer and the devil and our greatest slanderers act according to His Hukam- according to Truth- for they Are him they've just got to realise it... We are the light and the dark, the unconditional love that we have for even our greatest slanderers is the same love that God has for All.

This is Nirboah and Nirvair- a fearlessness to accept that All is him, no matter how much he beats us and has us slandered(hukam), and Nirvair- being All loving, regardless of his different images(whether dark or light).

The fact is that we DO judge according to image, for the entire creation is God, but we see it to be different- we lack respect and humility to accept hukam, to accept the game that he plays around us as Perfect and as deserved according to our deeds, and to teach all without judgement regardless of the false images of race, culture, gender and overall false identity.

We should love the devil and the angel, the murderer and the saint, for all is Him/ Hukam- all are at different levels of self discovery, playing their part in the khel as He wills it. Who are we to judge when it's Him that pulls the strings- He Always knows Best.

We are asked to accept the Hukam of his command in Gurbani, this is it- All is Hukam- All is Truth/ Him. Hukam/Him/Truth is our Keeper.

When we fully believe this within ourselves, teaching the Truth to our beloved in different forms can become so heartfelt. Fearlessness ensues, and we see the cultured and perhaps racist white man as our brother, as God and ourself in another image, who is at a deserved level of self discovery- we teach him openly without hesitation or reluctance due to ego and the illusion of segregation- no matter how sourly he may react.

We never committ a lie to others, not even a white lie and we don't lie to ourselves(a huge psychological problem people have in maya). We may face death, but we never forsake Truth- We Glorify it as our Gurus and Brahmgyanis(asians and non asians alike) before us did.

Good post. I guess it all depends on the receptiveness and intelligence of the receiver of the message, as well as his or her desire to genuinely want to learn something regardless of the form in which it appears.

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