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Questions Before I Take Amrit


Guest -Kaur-

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i didnt exist at that period of time.. im not disputing the dastaar, just.. its mandetory-ness.

women weere not forced to wear it. men oredy wore turbans. our gurus gave amrit to all alike, hen eternalised by guru gobind singh plus specific rehet.

my last word is that its optional..

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I strongly believe every man and woman should wear a dastar whether they believe it is one of the kakkars or not. It is a rehat that we shouldn’t wear makeup or jewellery. surmwidk iSMgwr nihN nihN

Ill try answer your questions to the best I can. 1) Removing any hair from your body is a no no. See it like this; you wouldn't damage a gift your parents gave you so why damage such a beautiful gif

First of all, congratulation in advance -that you are planning to take admission to the khalsa school (taking amrit). All the above questions are answered excellently by penji above. With that being s

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Guest -Kaur-

I feel sorry for assking this. So i talked to panj piyare today and i would like to address some of your concerns. To the person who said i am not ready to take amrit because i asked some of these questions. These are questions that cross any teenage girls mind, without a doubt. I also made clear that i dont have a boyfriend. Just someone who has mutual feelings for me as I do for him and we plan on marriage we are just too young. I also know through anything the guru will carry me. Amrit is not something you prepare for. when you feel it in your heart, you know its right. Taking amrit is not about being perfect before doing so, its realizing its a lifelong commitment. Being a sikh means being a learner, you learn as you go. How can you know what amrit really is before you take it. Each has their own experience. Laser hair removal being a woman, on your face, is a natural concern, I never once said i was going to do it. I simply asked because i know alot of amritdhari women do this. The guru can forgive ANYTHING. thats the power of him. Amrit is gurus nectar, it erases your past and gives you a new future. No one can tell me i am not ready. Wherever the guru takes me is where i am supposed to go.

regarding the turban debate. Both men and woman need to have thier head covered at all time weather it is a ramal, patka or turban. Tieing an actual dastar comes with time. Its part of a sikhs identity. ALL sikhs, amritdhari or not are supposed to have thier hair tied ontop of thier head in a jura and wear a dastar. Not all do so. As an amritdhari it is supposed to be tied and covered. That is all that is asked.

Its more about whats within you than what you look like. You naturally stop caring about material things and want to do things such as tieing dastar overtime. The more naam you jap that more simran you do, that more nitnem you do. The stronger your relationship to the guru the more your outside begins to match your insides. As a sikh you guys are all debating about useless things. Everyone is at thier own level, you should be supporting one another for whatever stage they are at, and helping them as needed. no need to argue about things that are different to each person. ITs about whats in your heart. Even some rehat, is old depening on the timeframe. not everything stays the same, but amrit is pure, it makes you pure and it shows you the light and is the first step on a whole new path of learning. I thought i needed a forum to answer my questions i was afraid to ask anyone else. But i realized its not. amrit is a commitment to the guru. Thats all it is. Everything else just comes if your pure inside.

bhull chuk maf karna.

god bless

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Guest desijatt

hii

although i m a sikh but i dont know enough about amrit ,i just got to know about it in past 2 months due to my fiance who took amrit 2 months back ,so i will try to answer your question with my knowledge and little bit of her views on this topic

1.i would not recommend you to remove your hairs , i know its difficult to stay like this in todays time and mucha and dhari lol ,cant say how she gonna look with mucha ,but why r u afraid of it ,r u doing this to become daughter of mata sahib and pita guru gobind singh ji or to show the world ,dont fell for world .

2.wearing dastar all the time is upto you ,do what your heart says here

3.you should not look for gf /bf relationship thing ,but if you guys are really serious then best thing is to tell your parents ,or you will feel guilty ,90% of relations end up in kaam things and after that only guilt is left ,if he really loves you and you guys are that serious about your relation ,then the best thing to do is get your family involved in this relation ,and beware because not all but most of the people today just look for kaam relations ,this age is to enjoy with your sakhis and family and you have rest of your life to live with your husband ,so keep your mind away from relationships and enjoy the beauty of life with your family and friends

,no matter how sure u r that this is ur future husband ,dont do anything foolish ,not even a hug thing ,kiss thing ,do it only after marriage with ur husband

4.ermmm i dont knw what to say but dont wear any make up ,be beautiful from inside and from whom r u trying to hide your face issues,

5. yeah no earring and polish thing

be simple and happy life is not all about relationships , i know it is diffcult to leave alone and it is reaallly diffcult to follow rules of amrit but believe this are worth it and i m too going to take amrit within a year and just 2 months back i used to eat chicken nearly on daily basis but i left it just for my fiance because i trly care for her , i now dont trim my daadi and i feel quite irritated with my facial hairs but hey who said life is easy ,i feel amritdharis looks far more beautiful than others ,they have some brightness on their face and i too want to feel all this goodness soon ,and to be true i just to self pleasure alot before but now i never touch my body for such habbit ,it gets difficult sometimes but its my negativity who stops me from doing good things and overall i just want to say please do anything which you are afraid to tell to your parents and GOD .....

wgjkk wgjkf

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Guest JgSingh

1. Laser is fine.

2. Most of the time yes (no need for dastaar if you do not wish to)

3. You should wait for intimate relationships til after marriage. But of course you can be friends with him...

4. Yes you can wear it

5. Yes you can wear jewellery etc.

Khalsa is about moving closer to Waheguroo.

Its about *starting* your journey, so a time progresses, the above will become irrelvant, and you will be strong enough to not bother with the above i.e you may wish to stop wearing makeup/jewellery etc...

Don't think you must be perfect before you take Amrit...very few are

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Some people are very stupid!! ...

U dont even know what sikhi is..

Today someone told me i have dogmatic views.. but does that mean guru sahib has dogmatic instructions, ???!! I THINK NOT!!!!!

and what your saying jgsingh is totally wrong and you know it too..

Flipping people.. dont no anything..

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Don't miss the forest for the trees. People get too obsessed - on one side or the other - with these issues, and miss the good stuff. When Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa and gave them the symbols of warriors and ascetics, I don't think he was intending us to get silly about it. It's the spirit and mindset that is what it is about, THAT is what is truly important, the symbols are auxiliary to that. I really find it difficult to believe that part of his intention was that Sikh women should have beards and mustaches.

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Don't miss the forest for the trees. People get too obsessed - on one side or the other - with these issues, and miss the good stuff. When Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa and gave them the symbols of warriors and ascetics, I don't think he was intending us to get silly about it. It's the spirit and mindset that is what it is about, THAT is what is truly important, the symbols are auxiliary to that. I really find it difficult to believe that part of his intention was that Sikh women should have beards and mustaches.

So then you think its acceptable for Sikh women to remove facial hair and commit a Kurehit?

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So then you think its acceptable for Sikh women to remove facial hair and commit a Kurehit?

I respect and support Sikh women either way. What you call a Kurahit is a man made artificial rule that only has meaning because you think it does. I don't argue for one side or the other, only for tolerance and understanding.

Hair is not a "gift from God," it is a product of our having adapted to our environment through human evolution. How much or how little you happen to have is just a matter of your genetics. That society at present commonly considers excess hair on women to be unfeminine or odd is just the way it happens to be at the moment. That doesn't make it right or wrong. I totally admire and respect women who are so empowered as to be able to themselves proclaim to the world exactly what "feminine" is, meaning EXACTLY what they are! And set THE trend. I love it. I think it makes the world a better place.

But I also do not look down or judge a woman who does not wish to have a mustache or beard and decides remove it. Not even a little. A woman's femininity belongs to her, and is not really my business.

As a man, if somehow growing a beard made many people you encountered assume you were effeminate, you might begin to understand.

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I respect and support Sikh women either way. What you call a Kurahit is a man made artificial rule that only has meaning because you think it does. I don't argue for one side or the other, only for tolerance and understanding.

Hair is not a "gift from God," it is a product of our having adapted to our environment through human evolution. How much or how little you happen to have is just a matter of your genetics. That society at present commonly considers excess hair on women to be unfeminine or odd is just the way it happens to be at the moment. That doesn't make it right or wrong. I totally admire and respect women who are so empowered as to be able to themselves proclaim to the world exactly what "feminine" is, meaning EXACTLY what they are! And set THE trend. I love it. I think it makes the world a better place.

But I also do not look down or judge a woman who does not wish to have a mustache or beard and decides remove it. Not even a little. A woman's femininity belongs to her, and is not really my business.

As a man, if somehow growing a beard made many people you encountered assume you were effeminate, you might begin to understand.

The 4 Kurehits are quite clear: no meat, no relations with anyone other than your spouse, no meat and no removing kesh. These are not "man made artificial rules,". An amrithdari women that removes facial hair has commited a Bujjar Kurehit. It can't be justified because all other women in the world do the same thing.

Rehit does not change because we live in a modern world, it stays the same. Its not about femininity, the same rules apply to man and woman. It is not acceptable for a man to remove facial hair, similarly its not acceptable for women to remove hair, whether it is on their face or on their arms etc.

If you argue otherwise you are going against Gurmat.

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"If you argue otherwise you are going against Gurmat."

I love this line above all = aparrent get out of any reasonable debate.

Now while i disagree with infromthevoids point of view he debates it rationally and logically, whereas the replies are lacking.

Sikhi for me is a personal understanding of SGGS for me it might mean one thing for you another. Xtremesinghs reply is only valid if he is a brahmgiani or can prove an understanding which is deeper than the rest of us seeing as he alone is able to condemn people as manmukh/gurmukh

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"If you argue otherwise you are going against Gurmat."

I love this line above all = aparrent get out of any reasonable debate.

Now while i disagree with infromthevoids point of view he debates it rationally and logically, whereas the replies are lacking.

Sikhi for me is a personal understanding of SGGS for me it might mean one thing for you another. Xtremesinghs reply is only valid if he is a brahmgiani or can prove an understanding which is deeper than the rest of us seeing as he alone is able to condemn people as manmukh/gurmukh

To say that it is okay for a female to remove facial hair, is CLEARLY contrary to Gurmat. It is not acceptable for a man, so the same applies to a woman. I am not trying to get out of a debate. It is black and white.

I said that removing Kesh is a Bujjar Kurehit and that all Sikhs should keep their hair- what is wrong with that?

And not once did I condemn someone as a Gurmukh / Manmukh.

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Guest -Kaur-

guys when i asked i was just a little nervous about taking amrit, i mean i heard different things regarding the questions asked thats why i asked on here, while some people told me i was allowed to do certain things, others said i could not. But all of this is besides the point. Inside you should know exactly who you are. Its about your intentions, being good on the inside first, the image comes with time, the more into sikhi you get, the less the material things matter, like removing hair. Im a teenage girl. Naturally having facial hair is going to suck at first and its hard to deal with in a modern society, but you adapt and it makes you stronger. This isnt a debate. EVERYONE is entitles to their opinion, it doesnt make them any less of a person. Taking amrit should be from within you, something changes mentally, and yes you must make physical changes, but over time you wouldnt even want it any other way. There are many people who are amrit dhari who remove hair in certain areas, but are beautiful people inside. Then there are also many people who fallow rehat completely, yet they are not so good inside, their intentions are bad, and they do other things (black magic, kaam, krodh,lobh moh...ect. ) Its not about that. I asked because they are controversial issues i wanted to know more about. I took amrit. I do not remove ANY hair, I do not wear earings though i still wear some jewlery like a necklace, I still wear nail polish here and there, and the rest is up to guru ji. I fallow rehat. and i do what is right and necessary for myself. As should everyone else. Guru ji doesnt like one person over another because they removed facial hair. In the big picture, this is nothing compared to what the khalsa is really about.

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Kaur, a person who commits a kurhait is no longer an amritdhari, according to the Guru's teachings. Guru ji, in his rahitnamas, has written that it is the rahit that he loves, and not the individual. Unfortunately, some people can't accept Sikhi for what it is and want to change it to suit their own mann marji, but that is not Gurmat marg. Guru ji writes that if you want to play the game of love, place your head on the palm of your hand (meaning give up your way of thinking) and humbly adopt the Guru's way of thinking. If someone removes their hair, I agree that it doesn't make them a bad person. But not being a bad person is not really enough to be a Sikh is it?

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