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Questions Before I Take Amrit


Guest -Kaur-
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Some people are very stupid!! ...

U dont even know what sikhi is..

Today someone told me i have dogmatic views.. but does that mean guru sahib has dogmatic instructions, ???!! I THINK NOT!!!!!

and what your saying jgsingh is totally wrong and you know it too..

Flipping people.. dont no anything..

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Don't miss the forest for the trees. People get too obsessed - on one side or the other - with these issues, and miss the good stuff. When Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa and gave them the symbols of warriors and ascetics, I don't think he was intending us to get silly about it. It's the spirit and mindset that is what it is about, THAT is what is truly important, the symbols are auxiliary to that. I really find it difficult to believe that part of his intention was that Sikh women should have beards and mustaches.

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Don't miss the forest for the trees. People get too obsessed - on one side or the other - with these issues, and miss the good stuff. When Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa and gave them the symbols of warriors and ascetics, I don't think he was intending us to get silly about it. It's the spirit and mindset that is what it is about, THAT is what is truly important, the symbols are auxiliary to that. I really find it difficult to believe that part of his intention was that Sikh women should have beards and mustaches.

So then you think its acceptable for Sikh women to remove facial hair and commit a Kurehit?

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So then you think its acceptable for Sikh women to remove facial hair and commit a Kurehit?

I respect and support Sikh women either way. What you call a Kurahit is a man made artificial rule that only has meaning because you think it does. I don't argue for one side or the other, only for tolerance and understanding.

Hair is not a "gift from God," it is a product of our having adapted to our environment through human evolution. How much or how little you happen to have is just a matter of your genetics. That society at present commonly considers excess hair on women to be unfeminine or odd is just the way it happens to be at the moment. That doesn't make it right or wrong. I totally admire and respect women who are so empowered as to be able to themselves proclaim to the world exactly what "feminine" is, meaning EXACTLY what they are! And set THE trend. I love it. I think it makes the world a better place.

But I also do not look down or judge a woman who does not wish to have a mustache or beard and decides remove it. Not even a little. A woman's femininity belongs to her, and is not really my business.

As a man, if somehow growing a beard made many people you encountered assume you were effeminate, you might begin to understand.

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I respect and support Sikh women either way. What you call a Kurahit is a man made artificial rule that only has meaning because you think it does. I don't argue for one side or the other, only for tolerance and understanding.

Hair is not a "gift from God," it is a product of our having adapted to our environment through human evolution. How much or how little you happen to have is just a matter of your genetics. That society at present commonly considers excess hair on women to be unfeminine or odd is just the way it happens to be at the moment. That doesn't make it right or wrong. I totally admire and respect women who are so empowered as to be able to themselves proclaim to the world exactly what "feminine" is, meaning EXACTLY what they are! And set THE trend. I love it. I think it makes the world a better place.

But I also do not look down or judge a woman who does not wish to have a mustache or beard and decides remove it. Not even a little. A woman's femininity belongs to her, and is not really my business.

As a man, if somehow growing a beard made many people you encountered assume you were effeminate, you might begin to understand.

The 4 Kurehits are quite clear: no meat, no relations with anyone other than your spouse, no meat and no removing kesh. These are not "man made artificial rules,". An amrithdari women that removes facial hair has commited a Bujjar Kurehit. It can't be justified because all other women in the world do the same thing.

Rehit does not change because we live in a modern world, it stays the same. Its not about femininity, the same rules apply to man and woman. It is not acceptable for a man to remove facial hair, similarly its not acceptable for women to remove hair, whether it is on their face or on their arms etc.

If you argue otherwise you are going against Gurmat.

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"If you argue otherwise you are going against Gurmat."

I love this line above all = aparrent get out of any reasonable debate.

Now while i disagree with infromthevoids point of view he debates it rationally and logically, whereas the replies are lacking.

Sikhi for me is a personal understanding of SGGS for me it might mean one thing for you another. Xtremesinghs reply is only valid if he is a brahmgiani or can prove an understanding which is deeper than the rest of us seeing as he alone is able to condemn people as manmukh/gurmukh

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"If you argue otherwise you are going against Gurmat."

I love this line above all = aparrent get out of any reasonable debate.

Now while i disagree with infromthevoids point of view he debates it rationally and logically, whereas the replies are lacking.

Sikhi for me is a personal understanding of SGGS for me it might mean one thing for you another. Xtremesinghs reply is only valid if he is a brahmgiani or can prove an understanding which is deeper than the rest of us seeing as he alone is able to condemn people as manmukh/gurmukh

To say that it is okay for a female to remove facial hair, is CLEARLY contrary to Gurmat. It is not acceptable for a man, so the same applies to a woman. I am not trying to get out of a debate. It is black and white.

I said that removing Kesh is a Bujjar Kurehit and that all Sikhs should keep their hair- what is wrong with that?

And not once did I condemn someone as a Gurmukh / Manmukh.

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Guest -Kaur-

guys when i asked i was just a little nervous about taking amrit, i mean i heard different things regarding the questions asked thats why i asked on here, while some people told me i was allowed to do certain things, others said i could not. But all of this is besides the point. Inside you should know exactly who you are. Its about your intentions, being good on the inside first, the image comes with time, the more into sikhi you get, the less the material things matter, like removing hair. Im a teenage girl. Naturally having facial hair is going to suck at first and its hard to deal with in a modern society, but you adapt and it makes you stronger. This isnt a debate. EVERYONE is entitles to their opinion, it doesnt make them any less of a person. Taking amrit should be from within you, something changes mentally, and yes you must make physical changes, but over time you wouldnt even want it any other way. There are many people who are amrit dhari who remove hair in certain areas, but are beautiful people inside. Then there are also many people who fallow rehat completely, yet they are not so good inside, their intentions are bad, and they do other things (black magic, kaam, krodh,lobh moh...ect. ) Its not about that. I asked because they are controversial issues i wanted to know more about. I took amrit. I do not remove ANY hair, I do not wear earings though i still wear some jewlery like a necklace, I still wear nail polish here and there, and the rest is up to guru ji. I fallow rehat. and i do what is right and necessary for myself. As should everyone else. Guru ji doesnt like one person over another because they removed facial hair. In the big picture, this is nothing compared to what the khalsa is really about.

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Kaur, a person who commits a kurhait is no longer an amritdhari, according to the Guru's teachings. Guru ji, in his rahitnamas, has written that it is the rahit that he loves, and not the individual. Unfortunately, some people can't accept Sikhi for what it is and want to change it to suit their own mann marji, but that is not Gurmat marg. Guru ji writes that if you want to play the game of love, place your head on the palm of your hand (meaning give up your way of thinking) and humbly adopt the Guru's way of thinking. If someone removes their hair, I agree that it doesn't make them a bad person. But not being a bad person is not really enough to be a Sikh is it?

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