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Guest Harman Kaur

Guru Nanak Visit To Srilanka

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Guest Sarvjeet singh

Research continues(PART-4)....

Next day, we went to the temple in Kurukkalmadam and it was divine being in that temple, we researched about the temple from various local people and priest of the temple, who disclosed that there is a pond behind the temple.

The fact was that kurukkalmadam is a place which is of 1km range and at one end their is the silent sea and other side a rough and deep sea and it was strange finding sea in the middle of that place.

DSC04085.JPG

That water of the pond was different...felt instincts of powerfulness(This was the first time during my whole journey , i felt instincts that were so powerful and peaceful).

For more, visit: http://ssmodi21753.blogspot.in/

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Thank you Jonny101,

Yes ,I have also read various books and sakhiyans related to the research done by our various Sikh brothers and I bow my head in front of them all for their true spirits .

I need help of everyone here so that our Sikh religion can be enlighted magnificentely

Waheguru ji ka khalsa...waheguru ji ki fateh!!!

.

Thanks bhaaji for doing your wonderful research on unknown and lost chapters of Sikh history. Wish you all the success in your research. How are the locals treating you, have you faced any difficulty as a Sardar in a country where there are probably just a handful of Sikhs?

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Veer Sarvjeet Singh,

I will PM you some details of Harpal Singh Kasoor soon, but it is difficult to contact him because he travels alot for his research.

Did you find the stone with details of Jagat Guru Nanak Sahib in Anuradhapura Museum?

Could you elaborate on the Sinhalese book on Guru Nanak Sahib which was given to you? What is said in it and do the locals still 'revere' 'Nanak Acharya'?

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971531_650913814936207_1003135413_n.jpg

Symbol we found in one of the temples

1002556_650949374932651_167425863_n.jpg

There was something strange about the symbol...it was on the script also,that we had earlier found.

Looks like a lotus flower, something which takes part in much of hindu themes as well as in gurbani:

Page 24, Line 3

ਐਬ ਤਨਿ ਚਿਕੜੋ ਇਹੁ ਮਨੁ ਮੀਡਕੋ ਕਮਲ ਕੀ ਸਾਰ ਨਹੀ ਮੂਲਿ ਪਾਈ ॥

ऐब तनि चिकड़ो इहु मनु मीडको कमल की सार नही मूलि पाई ॥

Aib ṯan cẖikṛo ih man mīdko kamal kī sār nahī mūl pā▫ī.

The defect of the body which leads to sin is the mud puddle, and this mind is the frog, which does not appreciate the lotus flower at all.

Guru Nanak Dev

The lotus flower is beauty surrounded by mud, just like a gursikh lives in sikhi within kaljug, the gursikh still keeps high beautiful virtue being in grace surrounded by paap. The lotus flower has been a very ancient indian analogy to explain synchronous living and to be in harmony and grace.

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http://www.allaboutsikhs.com/world-gurudwaras/gurudwaras-in-sri-lanka

Gurudwaras in Sri Lanka

Gurudwara Udasi Math, Dibar
Gurdwara Udasi Math, situated in Dibar, Batticaloa in Sri_Lanka
icon_address.gifDibar, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka
icon_phone.gifEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
arrow_right.gif

Gurudwara Pehli Patshahi (Kurukal Mandap)

KURUKAL MANDAP - A village in Sri Lanka, visited by Guru Nanak Sahib and Bhai Mardana. When Guru Sahib visited this place there was no village. The village owes its name to Guru Sahib. Kurukul Mandap means “Guru Da Nagar”. The tradition of the visit of a saintly missionary from the Punjab to that place is still well known to the local residents. According to a tradition Bhai Changa Bhatra belonged to this area.

Gurudwara Pehli Patshahi (Koti)

KOTI - A town in Sri Lanka, visited by Guru Nanak Sahib and Bhai Mardana. At the time of the visit of Guru Sahib, Koti was an independent State. Dharma Parkarma Bahu IX(1489-1513) ruled it. He gave a warm welcome to Guru Sahib. In the court of the ruler, the Buddhists and the Hindus held a debate with Guru Nanak Sahib. Guru Nanak Sahib finally succeeded in making them agree the supremacy of the Sikh philosophy. The ruler himself was highly impressed by Guru Sahib’s teachings.

Gurudwara Pehli Patshahi (Battikola)

A town in Sri Lanka, visited by Guru Nanak Sahib and Bhai Mardana. At the time of the visit of Guru Sahib, Baticulla was known as Matiakullam. Raja Shiv Nabh ruled it. Bhai Mansukh of Lahore had, earlier, visited this town and had told the ruler about Guru Nanak Sahib. When Guru Sahib visited the town, Raja Shiv Nabh’s joy knew no bounds. He requested Guru Sahib to stay at his palace. Guru Sahib visited his palace but stayed at a place, about 20 km from Baticulla, now known as Kurukul Mandap.

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Guest Sarvjeet Singh

Thanks bhaaji for doing your wonderful research on unknown and lost chapters of Sikh history. Wish you all the success in your research. How are the locals treating you, have you faced any difficulty as a Sardar in a country where there are probably just a handful of Sikhs?

Hi Jonny101,

thank you ji

Srilanka has diversified religions, such as Buddhiist, Muslims, Tamils. The locals who believed in buddhism, were very poliet and treated us with respect.. the other category of locals were muslims ,who used to consider us(sardar's) as Irani Muslims, but later when they used to realize that we are sikh from India, they used to be a lilttle disattached from us, but still they treated us with respect and the last category was of Tamils , near Jafna area,where there are many Hindu temples of Shiv ji, Ganesh ji and many more..and there is a lot of miltary strictnes, beacuse of which we were being asked to provide our identification proof many times.

Bhaaji,there are no Sikh families with citizenship of Srilanka, there are only Sikh resident's , who are there for their temporary jobs .So it was very difficult for us to communicate with other people,as the local language were Singli and tamil ,So the only communication language left was English, which was of great help.

Other than this, we were not able to find good food, as there was just a large variety of sea food almost available everywhere in srilanka.

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Guest Sarvjeet Singh

http://www.allaboutsikhs.com/world-gurudwaras/gurudwaras-in-sri-lanka

Gurudwaras in Sri Lanka

Gurudwara Udasi Math, Dibar

Gurdwara Udasi Math, situated in Dibar, Batticaloa in Sri_Lanka

icon_address.gifDibar, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka

icon_phone.gifEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

arrow_right.gif

Gurudwara Pehli Patshahi (Kurukal Mandap)

KURUKAL MANDAP - A village in Sri Lanka, visited by Guru Nanak Sahib and Bhai Mardana. When Guru Sahib visited this place there was no village. The village owes its name to Guru Sahib. Kurukul Mandap means “Guru Da Nagar”. The tradition of the visit of a saintly missionary from the Punjab to that place is still well known to the local residents. According to a tradition Bhai Changa Bhatra belonged to this area.

Gurudwara Pehli Patshahi (Koti)

KOTI - A town in Sri Lanka, visited by Guru Nanak Sahib and Bhai Mardana. At the time of the visit of Guru Sahib, Koti was an independent State. Dharma Parkarma Bahu IX(1489-1513) ruled it. He gave a warm welcome to Guru Sahib. In the court of the ruler, the Buddhists and the Hindus held a debate with Guru Nanak Sahib. Guru Nanak Sahib finally succeeded in making them agree the supremacy of the Sikh philosophy. The ruler himself was highly impressed by Guru Sahib’s teachings.

Gurudwara Pehli Patshahi (Battikola)

A town in Sri Lanka, visited by Guru Nanak Sahib and Bhai Mardana. At the time of the visit of Guru Sahib, Baticulla was known as Matiakullam. Raja Shiv Nabh ruled it. Bhai Mansukh of Lahore had, earlier, visited this town and had told the ruler about Guru Nanak Sahib. When Guru Sahib visited the town, Raja Shiv Nabh’s joy knew no bounds. He requested Guru Sahib to stay at his palace. Guru Sahib visited his palace but stayed at a place, about 20 km from Baticulla, now known as Kurukul Mandap.

Veerji,

The locations of Gurudwara's that you have mentioned, are just shown and pointed by Google ,but actually there is no gudwara in Srilanka.

The main essence of our research started through this point itself , I myself googled theses locations ,but after entering these cities such as Battikola,Dibar,Koti,kurukkalmadam , I realized that there are no Gurudwara Sahib, we even hired our personal guide of each respective city and searched every place including the various church's, Hindu temple's, mosque's ,in order to locate gurudwara sahib .

We even inquired at various Libraries, Record rooms,museums,police stations, post office, GPO, and the respective Archeological Departments.

and even had long conversation with local residents of each respective city, but there was no clue of any Gurudwara sahib in Srilanka.

But,In colombo, there's a Sindhi Samaj Association , who have created a club, and at the first floor of that club, they had done Prakash of Guru Granth Sahib Ji, along with other hindu dignities .They truely believe in Guru Nanak Sahib ji ,with full respect.

Waheguru ji ka khalsa...Waheguru ji ki fateh!!

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Guest Sarvjeet Singh

Veer Sarvjeet Singh,

I will PM you some details of Harpal Singh Kasoor soon, but it is difficult to contact him because he travels alot for his research.

Did you find the stone with details of Jagat Guru Nanak Sahib in Anuradhapura Museum?

Could you elaborate on the Sinhalese book on Guru Nanak Sahib which was given to you? What is said in it and do the locals still 'revere' 'Nanak Acharya'?

Haanji veerji,

We found these stone carvings from the Anuradhapra Museum

The most important one is

999343_649770988383823_1989348945_n.jpg

and the other scripts we found are:

DSC03179.JPG

DSC03202.JPG

DSC03260.JPG

and the book is written by a tamil resident of srilanka ,the book is about the history, community and religions of Srilanka, it also mentioned that Guru Nanak dev ji came to srilanka in 1511 and later it says that Nanak Gurunath visited Srilanka after 90-100 years.When we discussed this aspect with the author , he focused his words that , there were 2 Nanaks who came to Srilanka..But we corrected them, after a very long discussion we explained them that it means "NANAK GURU KA NATH" (Nanak Guru ka Beta)and not NanakGurunath .

It was clear that they confused BHAI PAINDA JI as Guru Nanak.

Many years after Guru Nanak Dev ji visit to Srilanka, when our holy book "GURU GRANTH SAHIB JI " was being complied, Guru Arjun Dev ji asked Bhai Painda ji to go and retrieve the history of Guru Nanak Dev ji from Srilanka.

We Debated long on this topic , we showed our Sakhiyan and other evidence to those people and they were very much convinced .

Images of the book written by the head of kurukkalmadam

DSC04025.JPG

DSC04026.JPG

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Guest Sarvjeet Singh Modi

Research Continues(PART-5)....

Main uss jal nu chakya bhi, tanh mainu vibration mehsus hui!! (I even tasted that holy sweet water and felt a vibration inside me), then we went to a temple ,and we found a symbol of a flower (similar to the symbol we posted in the later post)which matched the symbol in the script we had found in the museum.

There was a silver plate there, on which that symbol of the flower is inscribed. We tried to figure out the importance of that symbol, from various scholars and priest of the temple and they told us that that symbol is considered very much religious and the people worship it wholeheartedly.

video_object.png

We discussed this aspects with various local people ,who hesitated in the beginning but later as they got to know us and our work, they opened up with us and told us that there was a temple which was here since 100 years but dutch destroyed it , when they were in Srilanka and still the remainings of the temple were buried at that very place.

Next day, near the pond I prayed to god "Waheguru ji , main vyakul ho raha hun, par koi nai samaj payega meri vyakulta ko , ap meri madad karo, koi avshesh deyo ji, ki main loka nu dass saka ki haan!, tusi aaye si aithe..waheguru ji ,ashish baksho..wahegueu!!"(Waheguru ji, I am feeling restless after seeing the purity here and no body will be able to understand this , please waheguruji , give me some clue , so that i could tell everyone about your visit here.. Waheguru ji..help me..Waheguru!!)

DSC04094.JPG

and then I continued looking around that area, there was a place where I felt as if something is pushing me towards it. and my feets rushed towards that place and when I stoped, I was standing infront of a huge tree and it was bearing small fruits just similar to retha. we tried tasting that fruit, but local people stopped us from tasting it, they said it was poison.

But we had faith in the power and we tasted it and it was a sweet( after the fact that retha is always considered sour, most bitter and such a product is used as a soap in other parts of the world)

DSC04103.JPG

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Bhaji S S Modi Ji, blessed to do this fact-finding. May Waheguru bless you with success and keep sharing your findings with us please.

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