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Dsinghdp

Dharmic and Abrahamic

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The Dharmic faiths are more difficult to understand such as Nirgun and Sargun, Nirvana, reincarnation, soul separate from body, meditation. God has many forms.

Whilst Abrahamic is less difficult to grasp belief in a God, heaven and hell and a set of rules to abide by.

Most popular faiths are Abrahamic.

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36 minutes ago, Dsinghdp said:

The Dharmic faiths are more difficult to understand such as Nirgun and Sargun, Nirvana, reincarnation, soul separate from body, meditation. God has many forms

What do you mean by "dharmic faiths"?

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Just now, Dsinghdp said:
7 minutes ago, BhForce said:

What do you mean by "dharmic faiths"?

Faiths from the Indian subcontinent.

OK, well, why not say that? "Indian faiths"

What are you trying to get at by saying "Dharmic"?

What does Dharmic mean? (Before you say "relating to Dharma", what would you mean by "dharma"?)

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1 minute ago, BhForce said:

 

OK, well, why not say that? "Indian faiths"

What are you trying to get at by saying "Dharmic"?

What does Dharmic mean? (Before you say "relating to Dharma", what would you mean by "dharma"?)

For me it means eternal law of conduct. 

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Just now, Dsinghdp said:
3 minutes ago, BhForce said:

 

OK, well, why not say that? "Indian faiths"

What are you trying to get at by saying "Dharmic"?

What does Dharmic mean? (Before you say "relating to Dharma", what would you mean by "dharma"?)

For me it means eternal law of conduct. 

Well, how is that different from Christianity?

Don't they believe in an "eternal law of conduct"?

Luke 16:17 - And it is easier for heaven and earth to pass, than one tittle of the law to fail. 

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1 minute ago, BhForce said:

Well, how is that different from Christianity?

Don't they believe in an "eternal law of conduct"?

Luke 16:17 - And it is easier for heaven and earth to pass, than one tittle of the law to fail. 

Great to see that. But i was told by a Christian that Yoga is the play of the devil and will lead to hell fire.

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1 minute ago, Dsinghdp said:

But i was told by a Christian that Yoga is the play of the devil and will lead to hell fire.

OK, a lot of Christians don't like Yoga because they think that it has to do with Hinduism (they might be right). 

But that has nothing to do with our discussion.

So, when you say "Great to see that", does that mean you now say that Christianity is "Dharmic", according to your own definition which you gave?

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Dharmic Faith's are far higher than religion. It's a far higher thought.  Dharam is about creating a relationship with god our creator by destroying the illusion of duality. Our ego creates separateness and makes us think we are apart from our creator. 

Religion like christianity and islam on the other hand agree with this duality and separateness   they believe that god is separate from us and above in the heavens. In islam its blasphemy to say god is within us.

That's why when Christian's and muslims in the past realized the truth through meditation their thought became the same as dharmic teachings, like persian saint mansur al hallaj who said I am the truth  the radical muslim didnt understand that and executed him.

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1 minute ago, puzzled said:

Dharam is about creating a relationship with god our creator by destroying the illusion of duality. Our ego creates separateness and makes us think we are apart from our creator. 

1. So you disagree with @Dsinghdp 's definition of Dharam being "eternal law of conduct."?

2. In the line, "ਆਪਣਾ ਧਰਮੁ ਗਵਾਵਹਿ ਬੂਝਹਿ ਨਾਹੀ ਅਨਦਿਨੁ ਦੁਖਿ ਵਿਹਾਣੀ ॥" it would seem that dharam could only mean "duty". Do you agree?

Note: Prof. Sahib Singh and Giani Harbans Singh translate dharam as "farz" (duty) here.

3. Do you see a difference between "dharam" and "mazhab"?

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you may be able to define some aspects of dharma into English, but English is too basic to properly translate dharma.

When something is a religion as opposed to dharam, then it is more based on ritualism than dharma.

Unfortunately some jathebandis and SGPC (and their decisions and rehits) seemed to have started with looking at sikhi as a religion called sikh"ism" as opposed to a dharmik panth....

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1 hour ago, BhForce said:

1. So you disagree with @Dsinghdp 's definition of Dharam being "eternal law of conduct."?

2. In the line, "ਆਪਣਾ ਧਰਮੁ ਗਵਾਵਹਿ ਬੂਝਹਿ ਨਾਹੀ ਅਨਦਿਨੁ ਦੁਖਿ ਵਿਹਾਣੀ ॥" it would seem that dharam could only mean "duty". Do you agree?

Note: Prof. Sahib Singh and Giani Harbans Singh translate dharam as "farz" (duty) here.

3. Do you see a difference between "dharam" and "mazhab"?

I always thought of dharam as duty. 

Yes mazhab is basic stuff like islam and christianity. 

Dharam is above mazhab. Dharam is about experiencing the creator here on earth through meditation, through meditation you start destroying the duality and start experiencing oneness, the one creator. 

Mazhab is following a set of rules and obeying god so you enter heaven after death. No spiritual progress at all. 

Religions are a set of rules that's why people find it easy to understand these religions because they dumb you down and are basic,     dharam is an experience which people find hard to understand at first. 

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Dharam seems like more of a verb to me. Like truth in action. 

It's one thing to believe exercise makes you fit it's another thing to actually train and get the benefit. 

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On 1/19/2020 at 11:13 PM, GurjantGnostic said:

Dharam seems like more of a verb to me. Like truth in action. 

It's one thing to believe exercise makes you fit it's another thing to actually train and get the benefit. 

Concise yet deep

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