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Found 63 results

  1. Guest

    old historical buildings

    hi anyone know of any really old sikh buildings, from Gurus' times is possible? can you post a image? i just like historical artefacts and would really like to see a building dating back to those times.
  2. savalakhsingh

    Dharmic Books to read

    VJKKVJKF i love to read books about sikhi, especially autobiographies and history. I have read these books already: In English: Se Kinehiya Autobiography of Bhai Sahib Randhir Singh Autobiography of Bhai Rama Singh (In search of the true guru) Warrior Saints (volume 1) Chalda Vaheer Jatha life of Bhai Rajinder Singh ji Kurbani 1978 Zafarnama Hymns from Bhai Gurdass Compositions Ascending Spirits Bhai VIjay Singh Cosmic Symphony In punjabi: Jail chitthiya Puratan Itihaasik Jeevania Puratan So Sakhi (100 sakhi) Satwant Kaur some more i can't remember right now but if you have any suggestions like these books please let me know.. I would like to read more punjabi books as my punjabi is not that great at the moment and would like to improve. I can read and write okay but my vocabulary is limited so I have a hard time following along punjabi books especially jail chitthiya, i could not understand any of it. I have read Bhai Rama Singh jis autobiography in Punjabi too and that was pretty straight forward. Thank you VJKKVJKF
  3. mahandulai

    Life of Guru Arjan Dev ji

    Does anyone have any info on the main things Guru Arjan Devi Ji achieved in his life, and what he setup for the future...?
  4. mahandulai

    Guru Ram Das Ji

    Can anyone sum up his life, and how he passed the guruship to the fifth Guru, Guru Arjan Dev Ji?
  5. What were the causes that :- 1. Guru Angad Dev Died at the age 47. 2. Guru Ram Das ji Died at the age 46. 3. Guru Hargobind Ji at age 48. 4. Guru Har Rai ji Died at age 31. 5. Guru Harkrishan Ji Died at age 7. ( Most children survive chicken pox, Could there possibly a Conspiracy here and against all the gurus ) ?
  6. I've always wondered what the first edition covered that caused so much upset in the colonialist establishment of the time? “ONE OF THE MOST VALUABLE BOOKS EVER PUBLISHED IN CONNECTION WITH INDIAN HISTORY”: RARE FIRST EDITION OF CUNNINGHAM’S HISTORY OF THE SIKHS, 1849, HANDSOMELY BOUND (INDIA) CUNNINGHAM, Joseph Davey. A History of the Sikhs, from the Origin of the Nation to the Battles of the Sutlej. London: John Murray, 1849. Octavo, modern full brown calf, raised bands, burgundy morocco spine label.$4800. First edition, with map of Punjabi political divisions until 1803 outlined in color, color folding map of Punjabi political divisions after the treaty of 1846, and folding genealogical table of the Gooroos, handsomely bound. Cunningham joined the Bengal Engineers in 1831 and arrived in India in 1834. “In 1837 he was selected by Lord Auckland to join Colonel Claud Wade, who was then the political agent upon the Sikh frontier, as assistant, with the special duty of fortifying Firozpur, the agent’s headquarters. This appointment brought him into close connection with the Sikhs, and, as he spent the next eight years of his life in political employments in this part of India, he was able to obtain that thorough knowledge of their manners and customs which makes his History of the Sikhs one of the most valuable books ever published in connection with Indian history. In 1838 he was present at the interview between Lord Auckland and Runjeet Singh, the great Sikh chieftain; in 1839 he accompanied Colonel Wade when he forced the Khyber Pass, and he was promoted first lieutenant on 20 May in that year; in 1840 he was placed in charge of Ludhiana, under G. Russell Clerk, Colonel Wade’s successor, and as political officer accompanied Brigadier-general Shelton and his army through the Sikh territory to Peshawur on his way to Cabul, and then accompanied Colonel Wheeler and Dost Muhammad, the deposed ameer of Afghanistan, back to British territory; in 1841 he was sent on a special mission to the principality of Jammu; in 1842 he was present at the interview between Lord Ellenborough and Dost Muhammad and the Sikhs… He spent four years on [the History], and on its publication in 1849 it was received with the greatest favor by the English press, a verdict which posterity has ratified, for it is universally recognized as the one authority upon the subject. But though this history made his name as an historian, it brought him into deep disgrace with his superiors. In his last chapter he treated of the history of the first Sikh war, and in it he made use of the knowledge he had obtained while acting as political agent with the army in the field, and distinctly asserted that two of the Sikh generals, Lal Singh and Tej Singh, were bought. Both Lord Hardinge and Colonel Henry Lawrence, who had acted as political agent after the death of Major Broadfoot, asserted that there had been no private negotiations with any of the Sikh leaders; but the confidential position which Cunningham had held, and still more his disgrace which followed, are strong arguments that such negotiations did pass” (DNB). As a result of the controversy, Cunningham was stripped of his authority and ordered to go on regular regimental duty. He lost most of his income in the process and any possibility of political advancement. Indeed, the publication of The History of the Sikhs marked the end of his career. He was known primarily for revealing confidential documents and his great accomplishments were little recognized, The History of the Sikhs having been largely suppressed. Cunningham died unexpectedly in 1851. Indeed, the second edition—featuring Cunningham’s own corrections and additions—was not published until 1853, too late for Cunningham’s reputation to matter. Folding map expertly linen-backed, interior generally quite nice, binding fine. A lovely copy in fine condition. https://www.baumanrarebooks.com/rare-books/cunningham-joseph-davey/history-of-the-sikhs/89967.aspx
  7. Do they, to increase their population and awareness, but should there be a point where they give up, and go into the masses?
  8. It takes placed during the 16th century, between the well known first guru, and the last. A muslim boy, finds Guru, mysterious and wise, amongst Hindu and Muslim rule, and it is an epic tale. But I was wondering historically, between 1550-1600 were there any significant issues in Sikh history, that I would want to talk about?
  9. I was watching this video about Azia Bibi and the thing about it is that the presenter says that "islam like any other religion has contradictions" What contradictions are there in Sikhi aside from: Meat eating Chandi worship Necessity of the paaj Keeping non-amriti panth members from wearing kirpan Also, I recommend reading the article about this situation as we in our power must defend all peoples from this type of religious oppression. It is our duty through and through! If you feel moh during this I do not blame you since we are kept with out hands tied as these events unfold around the world. Our Guru went to war over situations such as this, OUR GURU WAS KILLED OVER SITUATIONS SUCH AS THIS! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asia_Bibi_blasphemy_case
  10. jkvlondon

    Great YT channel

    Lovely channel giving historic knowledge about current state of Sikhi in Punjab , Ranjit Singh is so straight like an arrow to the target
  11. As advertised on FB by Sikh Discover Inspire Talk 9 at Khalili lecture Hall london EC1H 0XG on 9th sep 2018 at 17:00 , tickets 5 GBP: Musician and PhD researcher, Kirit Singh, delves into the story of music at the court of Maharaja Ranjit Singh with a talk and unique performance reflecting some of the music associated with the Court of Lahore in collaboration with the dhrupad vocalist, Shri Prassanna Vishwanathan. This illustrated talk and musical performance will be followed by a Q&A session. Kirit Singh is a PhD student at SOAS university where he is undertaking research on the development and interaction between Hindustani music and the Gurbani Kirtan tradition, during the historical period in which Sikh patronage of the arts was at its greatest. He is also a musician and disciple of one of the leading torchbearers of dhrupad vocal music, Pt. Uday Bhawalkar. As a co-founder of the South Asian Music Forum, he is activeley involved in supporting young and talented UK-based musicians and encouraging intimate and authentic concerts of South Asian music. This lecture series has been organised by the UK Punjab Heritage Association (UKPHA) in partnership with the SOAS South Asia Institute (SSAI) . Image: Detail from a painting by August Schoefft of Maharaja Ranjit Singh at Amritsar listening to Gurbani Kirtan, circa 1841-43 (Princess Bamba Collection, Lahore Fort)
  12. Talk eight as advertised on Sikh Discover Inspire taking place at Khalili Lecture Hall london EC1H 0XG , Sunday 9th Sept 2018 at 15:00 , ticket 5GBP: The series continues with our eighth talk, in which historian and ethnomusicologist, Radha Kapuria, establishes how Punjab emerged as a major centre for classical music patronage under Maharaja Ranjit Singh, revealing the particular centrality of sword-yielding, cross-dressing female dancers in his diplomatic negotiations with political rivals. This illustrated talk will be followed by a Q&A session. Radha Kapuria trained as a historian at the University of Delhi before joining the Jawaharlal Nehru University for her MPhil degree. Her research investigated the oldest classical music festival of north India- the Harballabh of Jalandhar, Punjab. She built on this ‘micro-history’ by researching a more macro-level social history of music in the region during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries for her PhD at King’s College London. She currently divides her time between preparing a book manuscript titled Music in Colonial Punjab: A Social History, based on her PhD, and working as part-time Lecturer in Ethnomusicology at King’s. This lecture series has been organised by the UK Punjab Heritage Association (UKPHA) in partnership with the SOAS South Asia Institute (SSAI). Image: Dancing girls and musicians at the Court of Lahore, by Bishan Singh, 1874 (Collection of Prince and Princess Sadruddin Aga Khan)
  13. Talk seven as advertised on FB of Sikh Discover Inspire GT1588 Initiative page , taking place at Khalili lecture hall , london WC1H 0XG. On Sunday 9th Sept 2018 at 13:00 , Tickets 5GBP: For our seventh talk in the series, Dr Sâqib Bâburî, Curator for the Persian Manuscripts Digitisation Project at the British Library, explores the patronage of Persian manuscripts during the reign of Maharaja Ranjit Singh and his successors, including several recently made discoveries. This illustrated talk will be followed by a Q&A session. Sâqib Bâburî is the Curator for the Persian Manuscripts Digitisation Project at the British Library, presently cataloguing the Delhi Persian collection. Specialising in the history of mediaeval India, his doctoral research focused on the Royal Collection’s Padshanamah. Bâburî’s expertise covers most aspects of Persian codicology, calligraphy, palaeography and art history. This lecture series has been organised by the UK Punjab Heritage Association (UKPHA) in partnership with the SOAS South Asia Institute (SSAI). Image: Detail of the opening folio of a Gita Gobind manuscript, dated Ramnagar, 3 March 1835 (British Library, Or. 2767)
  14. advertised talk on FB of Sikh Discover Inspire GT1588 Initiative page , taking place at Khalili lecture hall , london WC1H 0XG on September 8th 2018 at 13:00 ticket 5GBP In our fifth talk of the series, Emeritus Professor at the University of Warwick, Eleanor Nesbitt, takes a journey of discovery through the writings and artworks of western women including the Eden sisters, Madame Helena Blavatsky and JK Rowling to reveal unique perspectives on the Sikh ladies they encountered over two centuries. This illustrated talk will be followed by a Q&A session. Eleanor Nesbitt is Emeritus Professor at the University of Warwick. Her career specialism was the ethnographic study of the UK’s Hindu and Sikh communities. She has written numerous scholarly books, monographs and journal articles and has spoken at conferences in Europe, Africa and North America on the subject. She often features on BBC radio and also acts as consultant for radio and television programmes, publishers and solicitors. She is on the editorial board of the journals Fieldwork in Religion and Religions of South Asia, is a founder member of the Punjab Research Group, and is co-editor of Brill’s Encyclopedia of Sikhism. She is currently working on her next book, Sikhs: Two Centuries of Western Women's Art & Writings (Kashi House: 2019). This lecture series has been organised by the UK Punjab Heritage Association (UKPHA) in partnership with the SOAS South Asia Institute (SSAI). Image: Portrait of Emily Eden and a detail of a watercolour by her of a female Sikh warrior and her family, cica 1838. Note the dastar and chakar and farla ... another example of suppression of Kaurs' history by our own ?
  15. mahandulai

    NEW SIKH DEBATE

    HI all, I am looking for someone whom I can ask Sikhi question to? I have questions about diet and history in sikhism and would like to discuss it with someone knowledgable and qualified. The questions involve eating meat, drinking, and sex from a scientific perspective and historical perspective I am also looking for someone whom I can debate with on Sikh Channel TV on these issues.
  16. IJJSingh

    Taajudin's Diary

    In the year 1510 AD, Taajudin Naqshbandi, a Persian/Arabic writer met Guru Nanak Dev ji during his journey through the Middle East. For the next two years, Taajudin lived with the Guru and kept a detailed eyewitness account in a manuscript titled Siyahto Baba Nanak Fakir. After taking a leave from Guru ji, Taajudin deposited the manuscript in a library in Medina. In the year 1927, Mushtaq Hussein a young man from Kashmir, while studying as a moulvi in Medina came across Taajudin's manuscript. The manuscript changed Mushtaq's life, and he converted to Sikhism and and went on to become famous as Sant Syed Prithipal Singh. While in the Middle East, Mushtaq visited several places built in the memory of the Guru and spoke to Arabs who were still Guru ji's Sikhs. The book ‘Taajudin’s Diary’ is based on the unpublished autobiography of Sant Ji. The book retraces the transformational journeys of Taajudin and Mushtaq Hussein following in the footsteps of the great Guru. This remarkable must-read book references historical documents and monuments little-known in Sikhism. The appendices in this book also contain information on lesser-known travels of Guru Ji in Nepal and Himalayas. You can get a PDF version of the book Taajudin’s Diary by emailing to ijSingh6002@gmail.com or by downloading from the link below: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1RZarO1zbeiH7OmgxJ1pjTJ-Z4LN38PuJ
  17. The shocking sight of a condemned man tied to the mouth of a cannon ahead of being obliterated by its blast. This was a form of execution that was designed to simultaneously terrify the population and defile the victim further. Just imagine the horror of the act itself and then what the family have to endure to somehow deal with the aftermath. Now imagine 65 men facing the same execution - that's what happened over two days in 1872 when the British Police in Punjab massacred 65 Namdhari Sikhs for their insurgent activities. The mass execution over two days was (on the face of it) in retaliation for a violent riot in which Sikhs and Muslims were killed, but for which the Sikhs were blamed. In reality it was in recognition of the rise of a new revolutionary force in the form of the Namdhari movement which caused the British to react in such an extreme manner. In addition to the violent horror of the blowing to pieces of 65 Namdhari Sikh men, a 12 year old boy (a son of one of the victims) was also cut to pieces. - Amandeep Singh Madra UK This picture is from Iran where this method of execution was used until more modern times. The 'Blowing from Guns' execution was used in India extensively during the mutiny and for very public executions in the decades that followed.
  18. After I am done reading the sikh history of 18th century , a feeling of dread envelops me . Its hard to explain but I feel like a state of panic . So many tyrants and so many torturous methods. Indeed superhero were the singhs and singhnia who survived all that ordeal . I can't even wrap my head around the fact that successive mughal governors of lahore , be it abdus khan , zakaria , yahya , mir mannu , all of them sliced , crushed between wheels, drowned , dragged to death the singhs . Yet, we somehow survived beyond the 18th century is indeed a miracle in itself. I feel very very depressing because there's so much of pain in sikh life of 18th century . I mean i can literally feel the pain and challenges that came with being as a sikh in that time period just by reading those historical books. Sikhs were without food , shelter , hunted like animals and dehumanized and declared outlaws. BUT the worse part , we didn't even get our fair share . Maharaja Ranjit singh established an empire with non-sikh majority in 1799 but less than a decade later Britishers were already in the picture. And within 50 years, that hard earned empire was lost. Its so hard to believe that thousands and thousands of sikh men , women and children bore torture and agonizing death for a period of self-rule so short. Heck , marathas and rajputs had it better without even a fraction of our sacrifices. What strange kind of justice god has . We atleast deserved 500 years of self rule for so much of blood paid. I don't understand what god was thinking. now you know why its depressing.
  19. SSA all, 15 years ago I found 2 miniature paintings in an old fort. They are on paper that is 2-4 inches in height and width , with glass on top that is meant to protect them. They are now very old and the paper needs to be restored/protected. One of them is with Guru Gobind Singh Ji on a horse and the other one is of Guru Nanak with Sidhs and Pirs [more than 9 people so probably not of the Gurus]. Question of the art and history aficionados what is the earliest depiction of the Guru's in the above manner? Here are some dates regarding the fort/people that I found them in: http://members.iinet.net.au/~royalty/ips/families/jalawalia.html
  20. Waheguru ji K aKhalsa Waheguru ji ki Fateh On this weekend , 4th March Guru Manieyo Granth Gurdwara sahib , Slough, UK will host the art exhibition " Without Shape, Without Form" admission free spread the news amongst your loved ones .
  21. Big_Tera

    Amritsar Gurdwara

    Why is the Amritsar gurdwara the most holy shrine in Sikhism? From my understanding the Gurdwara itself is quite newly built. As it was repeatedly attacked several times and had to be rebuilt over again many times. hence the original Gurdwara that was first built would have looked completley different to what it is now. When it was most recenctly built by Ranjit Singh. Are other Gurwaras not more important or historical in terms of history. Also having visted the Amritsar recently. I was saddened to see shops selling hindu god pictures along with the Gurus pictures.This was just outside the Gurdwara complex. On side note I personaly dont see the point with having all these pictures of gurus. God is not contained in any picture or murti.
  22. jkvlondon

    Dasam Granth seminar

    Waheguru ji ka Khalsa Waheguru ji Ki Fateh enjoy the seminar and the beautiful proofs
  23. AmandeepSinghBansel

    Puratan Sikhi

    Waheguru ji ka khalsa waheguru ji ki fateh, After doing much itihaas i have found it that the darshan of Sri Dasam and Sarbloh Darbar is of utmost importance for the sake of the chardikala of the Sikh panth alongside Satguru Granth sahib ji maharaj. What can be done in the uk and in sangats across the world to install sri Dasam granth and Sarbloh Granth as seen in Takht Sri Hazoor sahib were the maryada of the tisarpanth seems to be alive and well aswell as shastar darshan.Can those of us that believe this to be an important issue do anything to create change? The majority of non amritdharis seem to think that we only have one granth which sadness me. Our connection to Dasam pita seems to be cut when the majority of sikhs are ignorant on these traditions What can be done? Bhull chukk maaf karo, A manmukh.
  24. KhalsaLover

    History Sikh Books

    Does anyone know any good tittles? I'm trying to learn more about Sikh History, Arts ( Gurmat Sangeet and Calligraphy etc) and Literature. I would prefer if it was written in English. Also Im interested in old paintings so if there is book full of them please let me know. Thanks Gur Fateh Ji.
  25. JessieKaur

    partition

    WJKK WJKF , In light of the upcoming partition anniversary has anyone got any story's they would like to share that have been passed down or any knowledge they wish to share?
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