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Should I Go Pesh?


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Basically as part of my final year I didn't do the research project myself I got help some help from someone - who did most of the work. At the time it didn't seem like a big thing - I just considered it to be a opportunity to lighten the workload - but now a few months after I feel really guilty and regret my actions. Do you think I should go Pesh? Please reply only with intelligent answers. Thanks.

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I think you should clear this with Guru Sahib. Its wrong to do something like that. You recieve a grade off the back of a lie and you would be earning off the back of a lie.

Not trying to make you feel bad or anything, but students work hard to do their work (I should know, having just finished my degree!) its not fair on others to take a shortcut like that.

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in my opinion the education system is corrupt therefore if you cheated - its no big deal. panj pyare have more improtant things to deal with. if your conscience is really bugging you... do sewa, aardas then take hukamnama... after this follow your instincts.

i wouldnt feel sorry for people who did the work themselves.... good for them.

also congrats on completing your degree!

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If you feel guilty about what you did and really wiish to repent then be a Man and go to your course tutor and tell them him/her you did. They will make the ultimate decision of whether to reduce your grade, disqualify or even just let it be.

Yes, you can go to the Panj Pyare, do ardas and take hukum nama etc, but I believe that by doing that you are still trying to avoid the consequences of your actions.

Spaek directly to your tutors!!

I'm reminded of the play by Shakespeare called Hamlet. Hamlets uncle kills he's brother (hamlets father), marry's Hamlets mother and takes over the raaj. He soon starts feeling guilty about his actions/crimes and starts praying for forgivness. he makes promises to do such and such good deeds and to help the poor, give charity etc, but no matter what, he doesn't truely redeem himself by returning the throne to the true heir (Hamlet).

Ultimately, the choice is yours, if you truely feel you did wrong and want to correct it then you would only go straight to the University authorities and let them decide. Anything else is IMO a cop out, simply to remove the guilty conscience with out correcting your path. A bit like some catholic who robs and steals then goes to the priest to confess and absolve his sins, but he doesnt return the money he has stolen from the poor.

Also, as Paneer monseter says the Panj Pyare have alot more important things to do.

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in my opinion the education system is corrupt therefore if you cheated - its no big deal. panj pyare have more improtant things to deal with. if your conscience is really bugging you... do sewa, aardas then take hukamnama... after this follow your instincts.

i wouldnt feel sorry for people who did the work themselves.... good for them.

also congrats on completing your degree!

So 2 wrongs make a right?

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in this case an individual was not targeted... a system was.

i do not see this as a big deal... in any case it's down to the individual in question which is why i said "do sewa, aardas then take hukamnama... after this follow your instincts".

its not about two wrongs, i think maby we should reflect on "is it right to cheat against a system that is already corrupt?"

..... but thats only if you believe that the british education system is corrupt.

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in this case an individual was not targeted... a system was.

i do not see this as a big deal... in any case it's down to the individual in question which is why i said "do sewa, aardas then take hukamnama... after this follow your instincts".

its not about two wrongs, i think maby we should reflect on "is it right to cheat against a system that is already corrupt?"

..... but thats only if you believe that the british education system is corrupt.

Is the whole thing corrupt or just higher education? If you don't mind I'd like to hear more about your opinions on this subject. A new thread perhaps?

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i was fearing this lol

i aint got the time at the moment... ask me again in acouple of months and ill write you an essay. secondary education is most corrupt, but also most fe and he instutions are corrupt. they are under pressures to meet certain criteria which results in corruption.

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The story of bhoomiya chor comes to mind. When he met Guruji, Guruji didnt say confess your past deeds and go tell all the people who you robbed from. But instead Guruji gave bhoomiya some rules to follow which lead him to reform his life and also change the life of many others.I would say that, you do the same, do seva, seek forgiveness and inspire others. We all make mistakes and have moments of weakness, so dont be too harsh on your self.

Unfortunatly, the environment we live in, makes it too easy for us to stray from the path. The fact that you are feeling guilty only shows that you are still connected to sikhi. I think a befitting punishment for you would be to teach people punjabi or maybe teach english to non-speakers at the gurdwara sahib.

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haha be serious you want intelligent replies only to a question on cheating!

Go to your tutor they will downgrae your grade ndyoull be lucy to leave with a 0 and a academic warning!

Why are you feeling bad a few months down the line? not on the day? not after a week?

Let it go you cheated just dont do it again

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