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Dsinghdp

Punjab (India)

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Sikh Sangat from Punjab (India) living abroad should make regular visits to Punjab.

This way they stay in touch with Sikh culture.

Visit the Gurdware and see Sikh heritage. There’s 5 Takhats to see.

Also a chance to speak in Punjabi with everybody.

I have been 7 times myself and love it.

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Its definitely a experience going to punjab.  Iv been to all takht sahibs apart from takht Patna sahib.  I want to go to hemkund sahib. 

I also wanna go rakab ganj sahib delhi and paonta sahib.

Going Harmandir sahib and hazur sahib are experiences that you will never forget and once you have been your soul will keep wanting to take you back.  they truly are sachkhand on earth.

Apart from that the punjabi countryside is beautiful   and the sunset and sunrise are breathtaking. 

Hearing the granthi read japji sahib at amrit vela through the gurdwara speakers while you are still tucked in bed is really nice, one of the best things about your visit actually.  Hearing bani being read out loud in the pind through the speakers sounds amazing  especially early in the mornings when it's still dark. 

Downside is the corruption.  Though some people are bad and take advantage some people are really nice and helpful    when you get lost while travelling and ask one person for help  10 people will come towards you all wanting to give directions lol. 

Our car broke down in the middle of the fields and this grandad with his grandson who were working in their fields came to us and started fixing our car for us   grandad even told his grandson to go back to their house and get the tractor to pull the car all the way to our our pind if needed. 

People from cities tend to be rude and not wanting to help iv noticed! 

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To be honest apart from the Gurdwaras of Punjab. I don't think to much of the place. 

Having been s few times. It seems quite a boring and bland place. 

The only good thing are the greenery. 

Places such as Tamil Nadu, Chennai, Bombay are fare better. 

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31 minutes ago, puzzled said:

Its definitely a experience going to punjab.  Iv been to all takht sahibs apart from takht Patna sahib.  I want to go to hemkund sahib. 

I also wanna go rakab ganj sahib delhi and paonta sahib.

Going Harmandir sahib and hazur sahib are experiences that you will never forget and once you have been your soul will keep wanting to take you back.  they truly are sachkhand on earth.

Apart from that the punjabi countryside is beautiful   and the sunset and sunrise are breathtaking. 

Hearing the granthi read japji sahib at amrit vela through the gurdwara speakers while you are still tucked in bed is really nice, one of the best things about your visit actually.  Hearing bani being read out loud in the pind through the speakers sounds amazing  especially early in the mornings when it's still dark. 

Downside is the corruption.  Though some people are bad and take advantage some people are really nice and helpful    when you get lost while travelling and ask one person for help  10 people will come towards you all wanting to give directions lol. 

Our car broke down in the middle of the fields and this grandad with his grandson who were working in their fields came to us and started fixing our car for us   grandad even told his grandson to go back to their house and get the tractor to pull the car all the way to our our pind if needed

People from cities tend to be rude and not wanting to help iv noticed! 

Maybe he just couldn't stand you guys .So wanted to fix your car as fast as possible to get you out of there. Lol

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Punjab is developing fast. Better roads, transport and hotels.

The tourism industry is booming in India as well as Punjab.

The Amritsar airport is greatly developed  compared to 2 decades ago. Many flights are choosing to fly from there.

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3 minutes ago, Dsinghdp said:

Punjab is developing fast. Better roads, transport and hotels.

The tourism industry is booming in India as well as Punjab.

The Amritsar airport is greatly developed  compared to 2 decades ago. Many flights are choosing to fly from there.

Yet people are leaving in their droves..

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4 hours ago, Ranjeet01 said:

Yet people are leaving in their droves..

Punjab will in another 10-20 years time become a hindu majority . Sikhs will become a minority (already are if you count only turbaned ones) in the last place they're a majority in . The hard-won achievements of punjabi suba movement of 1966 will all be erased. 

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13 minutes ago, AjeetSingh2019 said:

Punjab will in another 10-20 years time become a hindu majority . Sikhs will become a minority (already are if you count only turbaned ones) in the last place they're a majority in . The hard-won achievements of punjabi suba movement of 1966 will all be erased. 

We need to concentrate on rural areas. The cities are infested with Hindus.

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2 hours ago, Dsinghdp said:

We need to concentrate on rural areas. The cities are infested with Hindus.

Cities have in general been hindu majority 

Even b4 partition 

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On 12/6/2019 at 4:54 PM, AjeetSingh2019 said:

Punjab will in another 10-20 years time become a hindu majority . Sikhs will become a minority (already are if you count only turbaned ones) in the last place they're a majority in . The hard-won achievements of punjabi suba movement of 1966 will all be erased. 

Yeah, and certain fudhus alienating and abusing Mazbhis in the pends, to the point of them converting to other faiths or trying to start their own ones really helps.......

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On 12/6/2019 at 10:39 PM, Dsinghdp said:

We need to concentrate on rural areas. The cities are infested with Hindus.

The problem is manifold  : 

Being a hindu / muslim male is easy, very easy .

The thing is this and usually not identified as such : Most males when given a choice wouldn't want a turban. Turban is to men what hijab is to women, pride for those to wear it and oppression for others . Atleast to the ones who're "free" up there . You seen when a sikh guy finally gets a haircut and becomes "free" on the top floor , he will rarely ever adopt the turban again. The turbaned ones are increasingly looking for shortcuts and opt-outs like "bandanas" and the newer pull-over-your-head type of things. Its enough evidence if men are given liberty , they wouldn't want a turban . This is bane of sikh religion. It's our bottlenecks of sort unfortunately. I hate to admit it , but it is. Newer generation of Sikh males who have grown up with their hair and dastar intact tend to trim their beards for convenience sake. Also they don't want to look like uncle. So fashion and looks is another villain of sikhi that enters the equation. This fashion factor could have been catered by having proper sikh males to be used as models for marketing male apparels , suitings/shirtings and so on . But here's another problem , political dependence. Sikhs don't have political sovereignty and can't frame laws like : "every male marketing promo needs to have 70% of sardar representation" 

Sikhism provides the respect to the individual , in the sense that a sikh male is given the choice EVERYDAY whether he would wish to continue on path of sikhi, when he's tying his turban. If he wishes, he may part ways with it. This choice is given everyday to a sikh when he's in front of the mirror tying his pagg. On the contrary, hindu/muslim customs are imposed on males in childhood, often forced. A male muslim is forcibly circumcised (one-time , not daily procedure) in his childhood. Similary, a hindu male has his customs done on him in childhood. Later on, males of both religions tend to live a liberal life . It is women in these communities who're regarded as upholder of traditions. In sikhism, it is expected of men. Eventually, sikh males realized that they're being taken for a ride because no one told the baandri women that they shouldn't pluck their eyebrows . Naturally the males wondered why they should alone shoulder the burden of sikhi. 

In such a setting, being hindu male becomes very very easy. Most hindu males don't have any idea of their religion. But that doesn't make them any less of a hindu. Sikhi however survives on its saroop. Hence sikhi is dwindling in punjab while others rise.

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