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Auctioning of Sikh historical artifacts.


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Looks like looted booty from the Lahore treasury from when the British annexed our country. Possibly descendants of those thieves who have hit on hard times and they are now selling the looted propert

What do you make of this?  

Sorry, but why is there so much concern over material artifacts? Do you guys even believe in Sikhi?

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An important emerald and seed-pearl Necklace from the Lahore Treasury, worn by Maharani Jindan Kaur (1817-63), wife of Ranjit Singh, the Lion of the Punjab (1780–1839)  Lahore, first half of the 19th Century

AN IMPORTANT EMERALD AND SEED-PEARL NECKLACE FROM THE LAHORE TREASURY, WORN BY MAHARANI JINDAN KAUR (1817-63), WIFE OF RANJIT SINGH, THE LION OF THE PUNJAB (1780–1839)
Lahore, first half of the 19th Century
Sold for £ 187,500 inc. premium

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1 hour ago, dallysingh101 said:

Do you? 

Please explain what importance these materialistic things have in forming a connection with waheguru.

Read some gurbani sometime and you will begin to understand how meaningless attachment to material things (and other worldly things) is.

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Just now, californiasardar1 said:

Please explain what importance these materialistic things have in forming a connection with waheguru.

Read some gurbani sometime and you will begin to understand how meaningless attachment to material things (and other worldly things) is.

It's cultural. It's evidence that our people weren't the underdeveloped, pendus they've become now. That they appreciated arts and crafts, and patronised skilled people. That they had a degree of civilisation, that has since been lost.  

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Just now, dallysingh101 said:

It's cultural. It's evidence that our people weren't the underdeveloped, pendus they've become now. That they appreciated arts and crafts, and patronised skilled people. That they had a degree of civilisation, that has since been lost.  

 

Okay, I understand what value this might have to people who feel that nationalism is important. But I think that spiritual development will free one from any need for such validation. At the end of the day, whether or not others believe that we had an "civilization" should not matter.

I think one of the problems with Sikhi is that too many gravitate towards it for reasons of nationalism and communal pride. We should strive the develop spiritually to the point where we are above such things.

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