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The Saint-Soldier: Documentary on Bhai Maharaj Singh of Bhai Daya Singh Sampardaya (first Sikh in Singapore albeit as a captive of the british)


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Well worth a watch folks. Akaal Purakh bless the Bhai Daya Singh sampadaya.     

Well made documentary! Born Nihal Singh in 1680; after Pahul became Bhagwan Singh; most well known as Bhai Maharaj Singh for his habit of respectfully calling others ‘maharaj’; became known as Ba

Bhai Maharaj Singh ji (who was a shardaloo of Baba Bir Singh ji) and his companion in captivity by the british:  

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4 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

Well worth a watch folks. Akaal Purakh bless the Bhai Daya Singh sampadaya. 

 

 

doesnt that nirmala sampardayi order its followers to become amritdhari? 

are theres others like it? 

didn't bhai maharaj singh belong to naurangabad dera (was baba bir singh ji nirmala?) 

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9 hours ago, NaamTiharoJoJape said:

doesnt that nirmala sampardayi order its followers to become amritdhari? 

are theres others like it? 

didn't bhai maharaj singh belong to naurangabad dera (was baba bir singh ji nirmala?) 

I'm no expert, but I don't think there were clear cut lines like you are suggesting above, I think nirmala influences are abound in the panth, apart from maybe in the modernist Singh Sabha lehar and other offshoots from it, like the missionary movement.  I don't think Sikhi has ever been about 'ordering' people to take amrit. 

Yes, Bhai Maharaj Singh ji was a shardhaloo of Bhai Bir Singh Naurangabad (who I learnt from the documentary was a Khalsa soldier in M. Ranjit Singh's army before they became a sant. Judging from the documentary Bhai Bir Singh was like one of the central dharmic figures during the latter part of M. Ranjit Singh's reign. That's probably why the Dogra's attacked the dera and made him shaheed. 

Bhai Bir Singh passed on his gaddi to Bhai Maharaj Singh ji.  

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  • dallysingh101 changed the title to The Saint-Soldier: Documentary on Bhai Maharaj Singh of Bhai Daya Singh Sampardaya (first Sikh in Singapore albeit as a captive of the british)
1 hour ago, dallysingh101 said:

I'm no expert, but I don't think there were clear cut lines like you are suggesting above, I think nirmala influences are abound in the panth, apart from maybe in the modernist Singh Sabha lehar and other offshoots from it, like the missionary movement.  I don't think Sikhi has ever been about 'ordering' people to take amrit. 

Yes, Bhai Maharaj Singh ji was a shardhaloo of Bhai Bir Singh Naurangabad (who I learnt from the documentary was a Khalsa soldier in M. Ranjit Singh's army before they became a sant. Judging from the documentary Bhai Bir Singh was like one of the central dharmic figures during the latter part of M. Ranjit Singh's reign. That's probably why the Dogra's attacked the dera and made him shaheed. 

Bhai Bir Singh passed on his gaddi to Bhai Maharaj Singh ji.  

even if it doesnt instruct its followers to do so, seems like a lot of panthic figures have come from there (hoti mardaan sant, kaharpuri, harkowal wale, etc.) 

I forget now but there was this one panthic leader who took amrit from hands of Baba Bir singh ji Nauarangabad wale 

(other than bhai maharaj singh ji) 

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9 minutes ago, NaamTiharoJoJape said:

I forget now but there was this one panthic leader who took amrit from hands of Baba Bir singh ji Nauarangabad wale 

(other than bhai maharaj singh ji) 

See if you can find out or remember who this is? 

These sampardaya are REALLY important right now (not that they weren't in the past as the thread demonstrates), because they have retained some stuff lost during the Singh Sabha lehar and also give us a trustable source to finally take ourselves out of the colonial baggage too many apnay still live in the shadow of.  

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42 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

See if you can find out or remember who this is? 

These sampardaya are REALLY important right now (not that they weren't in the past as the thread demonstrates), because they have retained some stuff lost during the Singh Sabha lehar and also give us a trustable source to finally take ourselves out of the colonial baggage too many apnay still live in the shadow of.  

Very frustrated right now

If I had to guess it would be some nihang singh like akali mitt singh, akali kaur singh jee, or baba Sahib singh ji kaladhari

It absolutely is a shame that Singh sabha sgpc guys have sidelined figures like baba binod singh ji akali 

And naurangabad mahapursh 

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5 minutes ago, NaamTiharoJoJape said:

Very frustrated right now

If I had to guess it would be some nihang singh like akali mitt singh, akali kaur singh jee, or baba Sahib singh ji kaladhari

It absolutely is a shame that Singh sabha sgpc guys have sidelined figures like baba binod singh ji akali 

And naurangabad mahapursh 

With Guru ji's kirpaa I think the SGPC's moon's eclipse of the sun will be over soon, and all Sikhs will be able to see the light that's been covered up - those that want too that is. I'm sure we'll have hordes of apnay who will resist and try and keep things as they are for reasons of stupidity and greed.    

We are going to take back our historiography and narrative!

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13 minutes ago, NaamTiharoJoJape said:

Lol maybe we can bring back last two couplets of sri benti chaupaee 

I think that was due to bapu teja singh bhausaria 

That guy has caused tons of bigan in panth that ripples to date

Might be the original missionary sikh we were talking about in another thread

I think it was/is more of a mindset/political thing; as opposed to just down to one person. Bhausaria might exemplify this thinking to an extreme, but variations of it existed in other important places and still persist today.

I think in the modern context, the ultimate climax of such thinking is exemplified in the writings of people like W. H. Mcleod and in the mind of his mentor 'older brother' J. S. Grewal and others who promote such reductionalist thinking, as if it helps explain Sikhs and Sikhi. 

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10 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

I think it was/is more of a mindset/political thing; as opposed to just down to one person. Bhausaria might exemplify this thinking to an extreme, but variations of it existed in other important places and still persist today.

I think in the modern context, the ultimate climax of such thinking is exemplified in the writings of people like W. H. Mcleod and in the mind of his mentor 'older brother' J. S. Grewal and others who promote such reductionalist thinking, as if it helps explain Sikhs and Sikhi. 

Did singh sabha figures like bhai kahn singh nabha and bhai veer singh support the cut-vad of sri benti chaupai? I've heard the former jathedar vedantis lame excuse for cutting last two couplets saying it doesnt follow ardas theme but that is debunked by guru Sahibs last promise that "man baanchat phal paavai soee dookh na tisai biapat koee" 

 

Was this solely due to people getting offended by "jag mata" 

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1 hour ago, NaamTiharoJoJape said:

Did singh sabha figures like bhai kahn singh nabha and bhai veer singh support the cut-vad of sri benti chaupai?

No they didn't I'm pretty sure in Bhai Vir Singh's teeka he includes the extended version

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1 hour ago, NaamTiharoJoJape said:

Did singh sabha figures like bhai kahn singh nabha and bhai veer singh support the cut-vad of sri benti chaupai? I've heard the former jathedar vedantis lame excuse for cutting last two couplets saying it doesnt follow ardas theme but that is debunked by guru Sahibs last promise that "man baanchat phal paavai soee dookh na tisai biapat koee" 

 

Was this solely due to people getting offended by "jag mata" 

I don't know about this specifically, but what does seem clear is that Dasam Granth was a headache for many who were pushing some anglicised, abrahamic 'Sikhism' thing. 

I know it even caught out greater minds than ours, like Nabha's, who seemed to be uncomfortable with CP, and may have gone through different stages when trying to understand it.  

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I know he's said some other controversial stuff but he always takes it with a grain of salt. An example of this would be of the article he wrote on what happened after the joti jot of Dasam Patshah but he says he's only heard from his father...

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