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Are Sikhs addicted to appeasing "others" at their own cost


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Guest amar

During COVID, we all saw how various Sikhs and Sikh NGOs came forward to help people of all religions,castes,etc as its our belief to do so. Delhi gurudwara donated gold and silvers worth crores to build hospital and recently inaugurated free hundred bed dialysis center. Good. Very Good. 

But where all these charity goes when sikhs in punjab themselves are suffering due to daily farmers suicides, families destroyed due to fake encounters, drugs, poor employment opportunities, immigration,etc.

When we are in trouble, nobody comes to help. Not even our own and nor the ones whom we helped. Normal educated people dont even want to discuss the solutions of these problems.  Ofcourse, we have Khalsa Aid, but it can only contribute an iota of whats required.

Its like our own house is on fire but we are rushing to see if our neighbors need any help.

Our leaders were all puppets who worked at behest of our enemies. Even they cheated us. 

Are Sikhs addicted to appeasing "others" at their own cost.

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The Singh Sabha did not come about in a vacuum. The other two religions of Punjab also attempted to present their beliefs in the light of modern research and in language that the rulers would understa

I think that Sikh orgs should first help Sikhs in need and then help others

'Groomed' is a word you should be familiar with. 

On 6/4/2021 at 11:11 AM, Guest amar said:

Are Sikhs addicted to appeasing "others" at their own cost.

There is a strong element of what used to be called chaaploosian (in Panjabi) towards outsiders amongst our lot (or as they used to say in east London - ar5elicking.) I think it stems from lack of true confidence myself? 

I think certain apnay feel like they stick out and are uncomfortable with it, and thus try and placate outsiders by going overboard. When I was at school, Jamaicans used to have a phrase for it: "beg-friend" i.e. someone desperate to befriend someone else.

I remember reading an article in Panjabi a while ago, and it made a good point: the chaaploose type of apnay and apneean like to go on about sarbat da bhalla as justification for their actions, but go on like we Sikhs ourselves don't fall into 'sarbat'.

That being said, this is a big topic, and to truly explore it, I'd have to say things that I'm not going to in public where gairh-Sikhs can read it.   

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On 6/4/2021 at 11:11 AM, Guest amar said:

During COVID, we all saw how various Sikhs and Sikh NGOs came forward to help people of all religions,castes,etc as its our belief to do so. Delhi gurudwara donated gold and silvers worth crores to build hospital and recently inaugurated free hundred bed dialysis center. Good. Very Good. 

But where all these charity goes when sikhs in punjab themselves are suffering due to daily farmers suicides, families destroyed due to fake encounters, drugs, poor employment opportunities, immigration,etc.

When we are in trouble, nobody comes to help. Not even our own and nor the ones whom we helped. Normal educated people dont even want to discuss the solutions of these problems.  Ofcourse, we have Khalsa Aid, but it can only contribute an iota of whats required.

Its like our own house is on fire but we are rushing to see if our neighbors need any help.

Our leaders were all puppets who worked at behest of our enemies. Even they cheated us. 

Are Sikhs addicted to appeasing "others" at their own cost.

When Sikhs do these chartiable acts like you mentioned. Its good for the Sikh image. Many people are drawn to the Sikh religion buy these generous acts. Sikhs should always be ready to help everyone. This is actually a way of doing parchaar.

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On 6/4/2021 at 11:11 AM, Guest amar said:

During COVID, we all saw how various Sikhs and Sikh NGOs came forward to help people of all religions,castes,etc as its our belief to do so. Delhi gurudwara donated gold and silvers worth crores to build hospital and recently inaugurated free hundred bed dialysis center. Good. Very Good. 

But where all these charity goes when sikhs in punjab themselves are suffering due to daily farmers suicides, families destroyed due to fake encounters, drugs, poor employment opportunities, immigration,etc.

When we are in trouble, nobody comes to help. Not even our own and nor the ones whom we helped. Normal educated people dont even want to discuss the solutions of these problems.  Ofcourse, we have Khalsa Aid, but it can only contribute an iota of whats required.

Its like our own house is on fire but we are rushing to see if our neighbors need any help.

Our leaders were all puppets who worked at behest of our enemies. Even they cheated us. 

Are Sikhs addicted to appeasing "others" at their own cost.

Hi

you say "we", but what have you personally done to help those causes?  there's a saying in English that if you are not part of the solution you are a part of the problem.  why do so many sikhs like to criticise others lack of action?  why don't you do something to help them?  you want someone else to do all the work while you complain.

sikh groups do setup schools, medical help etc in punjab.  helping with medical things is straightforward, but the issues you mention are more complex.

for example, what is causing farmers suicides, drugs, poor employment?  its not like an illness where we can just pay for medicine, is it?

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On 6/10/2021 at 9:32 PM, Big_Tera said:

When Sikhs do these chartiable acts like you mentioned. Its good for the Sikh image. Many people are drawn to the Sikh religion buy these generous acts. Sikhs should always be ready to help everyone. This is actually a way of doing parchaar.

what did this disgusting missionary mentality come from?

helping the needy is not "parchaar".  its not mean to give "good image" or "draw people to the sikh religion".

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On 6/11/2021 at 5:06 PM, Guest guest said:

what did this disgusting missionary mentality come from?

helping the needy is not "parchaar".  its not mean to give "good image" or "draw people to the sikh religion".

I agree. Sewa is not being done for gain of something. It is selfless service

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On 6/11/2021 at 9:59 PM, Guest guest said:

for example, what is causing farmers suicides, drugs, poor employment?  its not like an illness where we can just pay for medicine, is it?

It's because at our political apex we have retards who don't even have a basic understanding of economics (or probably just don't care as long as they and their cronies are okay); who are incapable of developing Panjab's economy for the wider prosperity of all. Instead we are stuck in some outdated, feudal style rural nightmare. These are the consequences. It's self inflicted.

That's why despite M. Ranjit Singh's flaws, I respect him, he understood that and made the Sikh raj something most of the inhabitants felt happy about. Compare that to the 'leader' Panjabis continually vote in these days.....  

 

2 hours ago, intrigued said:

I agree. Sewa is not being done for gain of something. It is selfless service

Protecting and developing the panth is great sewa. We didn't grow and develop as a panth without it. Our own Guru's set the precedents. They developed economies, towns, villages, forts, patronised literacy and literature. Sacrificed themselves and their families and beloved Sikhs for it. Encouraged casteless cooperation amongst Sikhs. In short, uplifted us in all dimensions. When we are on a downward slide, we need to check that and reverse it. 

  

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14 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

Protecting and developing the panth is great sewa. We didn't grow and develop as a panth without it. Our own Guru's set the precedents. They developed economies, towns, villages, forts, patronised literacy and literature. Sacrificed themselves and their families and beloved Sikhs for it. Encouraged casteless cooperation amongst Sikhs. In short, uplifted us in all dimensions. When we are on a downward slide, we need to check that and reverse it. 

I agree with this. My point above was that seva shouldn't be done in the intent to convert

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On 6/13/2021 at 12:46 AM, intrigued said:

I agree with this. My point above was that seva shouldn't be done in the intent to convert

Parchaar is not about "converting" pursue. Its about rasing awareness of the Gurus message. If people choose to convert thats completley up to them.  But we should always be ready to raise awarness about Sikhi which can be done alongside sikh events. In Sikhi we dont have this notion that somone can only be saved through Sikh religion. 

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Sikhs are different. Routinisation of ‘sewa’ primes them to help others. The pandemic demonstrated this

June 11, 2021, 9:24 PM IST Dipankar Gupta in TOI 

 https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/blogs/toi-edit-page/sikhs-are-different-routinisation-of-sewa-primes-them-to-help-others-the-pandemic-demonstrated-this/

Think of Sikhs and the mind conjures a barrel of laughs, a chest full of medals and a well-stocked bar. Or, to recall the old joke: Neil Armstrong lands on the moon expecting to be the first, only to find a Sikh taxi driver had beaten him to it.

That was then, but what about now? This pandemic has changed the popular image of Sikhs, not just in India, but the world over. People from distant Croatia and Syria acknowledged the help Sikhs gave them during their nightmare moments, and neither did US hesitate to rename New York’s 101 as Punjab Avenue to honour the contribution of Sikhs to the city.

Nearer home, in India, the impressive contribution of Sikh organisations in fighting the ongoing pandemic has been cited in the press and in the media in the most glowing terms. From providing oxygen, to ambulatory service, to feeding the poor, the Sikhs are nearly always the first to help. Even when relations quail to pick up a Covid corpse, Sikh volunteers willingly, and unhesitatingly, come forward.

There has to be a special reason for this. The answer lies in Sikh religion. Yes, of course, Sikhism, like every religion professes universal love, encourages altruism and promotes compassion. But it does something more which no other religious denomination does and that aspect is lodged in Sikhism’s main frame. It is in Sikhism alone that service to others is an important aspect of devotional practice for the laity, especially for the laity, within the temple premises.

True, other religions have saints, healers and preceptors too, yet in Sikhism alone it is the laity and not the virtuosos, it is the everyday worshipper and not the ordained priests, who are the heroes. It is they who uphold the fundaments of their religion, its absolutely essential core, by serving others and performing ‘sewa’.

It begins with the person who puts away your shoes at the temple gates, to the person who assiduously sweeps the temple floors, to those who stand over hot fires in the kitchen ‘langar’. It is the routinisation of these everyday acts of service that primes Sikhs to reach out to others even where there is no gurdwara in sight. They still call that ‘kar sewa’, or serving the house of God, because God is everywhere.

In Sikhism, it is not the great, the gifted, the sage who serves ordinary people but it is ordinary people who serve ordinary people. Nor is there a special premium reserved in Sikhism for serving the guru, the maulvi, the deacon, which is above serving everyday people including those who are non-Sikhs too.

If Sikh gurdwaras are spotlessly clean, langars bountiful, and there is shelter for all, then that is because devotees practise service as a routine religious act and not as a deliberated heroic act.

For such ‘sewa’ to be performed, Sikhs don’t need the ‘granthi’, the priest, or the ‘raagi’, nor sundry virtuosos to sign up. The communion, or the ‘sangat’, does not just pray together, but serves together as well. Nor does this service happen on special occasions determined by the movement of heavenly bodies. ‘Sewa’ is a routine daily activity without which everyday worship by everyday Sikhs is incomplete.

Charity is not a standalone attribute in Sikhism. When Sikhs step out to help others they do not do it as charity, but as service first. Charity is not uppermost in their minds as it may be in other religions. Service is more immediate and has to be done at close quarters. Charity and almsgiving are not quite the same for they can be performed at a distance. To perform service trumps plain charity, because when service begins at home, especially at the home of God, can charity be far behind?

It is this unique aspect of Sikhism that makes Sikhs stand out in times of trouble. It is not because Sikhs are brave, for some mysterious genetic reason, that they jump into the fray and face dangerous wars and viruses without a thought. There are brave people in all communities, the Marathas, the Gorkhas, the Rajputs, and the list goes on. Sikh bravery is not bravery first, but service first and that is where the difference lies. A Sikh may be a ‘Rambo’ outside, but bring one such person to a gurdwara and you will find a devotee at heart.

Even in the gurdwara, the donation that Sikhs make before the book is not marked by grandstanding of the kind that other charity events are. The money is slipped, unannounced and with no fanfare, into the collection box. Who has given how much is not known and no receipts are issued, no loudspeaker commends the generous giver and that is what makes this act a commendably egalitarian one. Rich and poor are all the same as they approach the Holy Book under the canopy.

It is this centralisation of service as ritual that marks Sikhism out from other religions and gives it its remarkable and unique feature. It is this that primarily explains why so many Sikhs, in temple organisations and outside, are willing to risk their lives to save distraught patients. When others have either turned their backs, or pleaded helplessness, trust a Sikh to fill in the breach. To modify a popular riff: ‘A Sikh who does sewa is worth sawa lakh’!

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This is an example of how we are seen by a lot of non-Sikhs:

 

400m Indian athlete, Milkha Singh. 

Wiki: '..one of 15 siblings, 8 of whom died before the Partition of India. He was orphaned during the Partition when his parents, a brother & 2 sisters were killed in the violence'

I have yet to meet a Sikh I don't like, beautiful people.

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Guest Ravinder Singh

Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa

Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh.

                     This is in reference to the spiritual message by Thakur Daleep Singh Ji, it is true that Sikhs all over the world are doing an exemplary service to Humanity for the last 2 years since the pandemic. It is known to Mankind that the Gurus Sikhs are always there in the forefront for service to the poor and sufferers anywhere in the world. But as Thakur Daleep Singh Ji have mentioned, maybe our Sikh leaders and philanthropists have just missed and forgotten suffering Sikhs like Us, who have been struggling to survive  in this crisis. I and My daughter became Covid +ve. We both lost our jobs in March,2020 due to Lock Down. I have approached many Sikh intellectuals,leaders and philanthropists for a job only and not some Charity/Money,but there has been no response. In these crisis times a Saviour came to my help as Guru Nanak Sahib's Messenger in the form of my Mother like Sister. She has helped and fed my family since March,2020.
None of the Sikh Intellectuals helped me out. 
Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa
Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh.
Ravinder Singh.
 
 
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On 6/20/2021 at 3:55 AM, Guest Ravinder Singh said:

Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa

Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh.

                     This is in reference to the spiritual message by Thakur Daleep Singh Ji, it is true that Sikhs all over the world are doing an exemplary service to Humanity for the last 2 years since the pandemic. It is known to Mankind that the Gurus Sikhs are always there in the forefront for service to the poor and sufferers anywhere in the world. But as Thakur Daleep Singh Ji have mentioned, maybe our Sikh leaders and philanthropists have just missed and forgotten suffering Sikhs like Us, who have been struggling to survive  in this crisis. I and My daughter became Covid +ve. We both lost our jobs in March,2020 due to Lock Down. I have approached many Sikh intellectuals,leaders and philanthropists for a job only and not some Charity/Money,but there has been no response. In these crisis times a Saviour came to my help as Guru Nanak Sahib's Messenger in the form of my Mother like Sister. She has helped and fed my family since March,2020.
None of the Sikh Intellectuals helped me out. 
Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa
Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh.
Ravinder Singh.
 
 

I think that Sikh orgs should first help Sikhs in need and then help others

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