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Singhshaster

'shaheed'

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Why are we always quick to label someone as a shaheed? If someone gets killed theses days they automatically made into a shaheed. Shaheed comes from the arabic word to denote a matyre. Someone who dies in defence of a religion or dies while fighting a cause.

These days if someone goes out to do some shopping and gets hit by a bullet and dies, instantly becomes a shaheed.

Edited by Singhshaster

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Guest Jacfsing2

Why are we always quick to label someone as a shaheed? If someone gets killed theses days they automatically made into a shaheed. Shaheed comes from the arabic word to denote a matyre. Someone who dies in defence of a religion or dies while fighting a cause.

These days if someone goes out to do some shopping and gets hit by a bullet and dies instantly becomes a shaheed.

The reason people do it is to make them feel like people are still being Shaheed for Sikhi. It makes people feel more right.

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Why are we always quick to label someone as a shaheed? If someone gets killed theses days they automatically made into a shaheed. Shaheed comes from the arabic word to denote a matyre. Someone who dies in defence of a religion or dies while fighting a cause.

These days if someone goes out to do some shopping and gets hit by a bullet and dies instantly becomes a shaheed.

I feel the same way. A true shaheed is the one who knows they are going to die and their jeevan is of a high gursikh. I won't call a Mona a shaheed.

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In my Nana's Pind, Talhan, dist. Jalandhar, there is a Guru Ghar that was erected in memory of a bazurg Gursikh who was named a Shaheed after he met with an accident in a well whilst installing a pulley. His name was Baba Nihaal Singh. He was an upstanding Sikh, but to call him a martyr for dying whilst going about his daily profession really is extravagantly silly.

Its not just the term Shaheed that gets thrown around with careless abandon. Mahapurakh, Sant, Giani, Brahmgiani, all of these titles are administered too readily.

Edited by Balkaar
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In my Nana's Pind, Talhan, dist. Jalandhar, there is a Guru Ghar that was erected in memory of a bazurg Gursikh who was named a Shaheed after he met with an accident in a well whilst installing a pulley. His name was Baba Nihaal Singh. He was an upstanding Sikh, but to call him a martyr for dying whilst going about his daily profession really is extravagantly silly.

Its not just the term Shaheed that gets thrown around with careless abandon. Mahapurakh, Sant, Giani, Brahmgiani, all of these titles are administered too readily.

I agree 100%

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The title 'Shaheed' should be conferred upon only someone who knowingly and willingly lays down their life for Sikhi, i.e. a conscious decision to embrace a guaranteed death.

When it comes to high-pressure situations such as a protest and a march for a cause, I find the line becomes a bit blurred. In that situation you could argue you're taking your life into your own hands, but equally you don't wish to die, although there's a chance you might. In that situation I honestly don't know what those who lose their lives should be termed as.

Edited by MisterrSingh

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Strictly speaking though, the word 'Shaheed', by very definition, means someone who has laid his life down for Islam. Similar to the way that the ancient greek word for 'witness' was 'maturos' (i.e the origin of our English word 'martyr'), the word Shaheed only meant 'witness' in classical Arabic. It was in one of the hadiths of the Quran that it was first given a new meaning, perhaps borrowing from the Greek example, i.e as someone who dies for Islam.

As for how it reached us, well Arabic penetrated Persian and Persian of course is part and parcel of Punjabi and before you know it we too started using the word. That doesn't, of course, change the actual definition of the word just as we can't just suddenly decide to change the meaning of the word 'bread' just because it suits us. Its too late now of course because the word shaheed is very much a part of our psyche but perhaps a long time yesteryear we should have come up with our own word which specificaly meant a martyr for Sikhi.

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I feel the same way. A true shaheed is the one who knows they are going to die and their jeevan is of a high gursikh. I won't call a Mona a shaheed.

Quite a few monay gave their lives during the Sangarsh, and did more for Sikhi than you, me, or anyone else here. Keeping your kes gives you no right to take away the shaheedi status from them.

I wouldn't consider Bhai Jagjeet Singh a shaheed though, he wasn't even part of the protest, but had be been, it'd be a different story.

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How can a mona be shaheed in our religion when he can't even listen to our Sri Guru jis and be keshdari.. Think about that for a moment.

You are a fascinating study Preeet. I've never encountered anyone who can have such fanatically militant views on Sikhi and still shamelessly peddle Bahmanwaad.

Edited by Balkaar
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How can a mona be shaheed in our religion when he can't even listen to our Sri Guru jis and be keshdari.. Think about that for a moment.

The definition of "Shaheed" isn't one who obeys the Gurus every command, it is one who gives his life in defence of religion. You need to drop this, don't even try putting down guys like Deepa Heranwala.

EDIT: LOL ^^

Edited by KhoonKaBadlaKhoon
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The title 'Shaheed' should be conferred upon only someone who knowingly and willingly lays down their life for Sikhi, i.e. a conscious decision to embrace a guaranteed death.

When it comes to high-pressure situations such as a protest and a march for a cause, I find the line becomes a bit blurred. In that situation you could argue you're taking your life into your own hands, but equally you don't wish to die, although there's a chance you might. In that situation I honestly don't know what those who lose their lives should be termed as.

What's Bhai Fauja Singh Ji to you?

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What's Bhai Fauja Singh Ji to you?

That's what I was saying earlier. I'm erring towards Shaheed though, because of the situation they were in. Of course, looking at Bhai Fauja Singh's life beyond the incident that caused their death would tell you they were a remarkable individual and worthy of the honour of being labeled a Shaheed.

Some may call it semantics, but giving someone such a title should not be taken lightly IMO.

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That's probably the normal definition, but not a dharmic definition that most people use.

The normal definition of something is the definition that most people use. That's why it's called norm-al, or that which is prevailing.

Forget being dharmic, what you should really focus on Preeet is purchasing a dictionary.

Edited by Balkaar
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