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Maharani Jind Kaur's Gutka in British Library


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Maharani Jind Kaurs personal Gutka Sahib is in the British library, most likely stacked like any other book. Its beadbi disrespect. They shipped countless things from Punjab to London once they took over Punjab. Makes you wonder how many other Guru Granth sahibs, Gutkas sahibs, shastars they have stacked on selves gathering dust. its just wrong. Every now and then a object from the Sikh empire pops up out of the blue at British auctions and sells for £1000s      they are still making money of these things decades after the empire left India.   Imagine them flogging something like this at auction?    if they have some decency then things of religious importance and value should be returned. 

 

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The website says 

" This Sikh manuscript was the personal prayer book of the Maharani. It was prepared between 1828 and 1830 for Rani Jindan Kaur (c.1817–63), a younger wife of Maharaja Ranjit Singh (1780–1839) and mother of Dalip Singh (reg.1843–49). It consists of three compositions from the Guru Granth Sahib: Guru Nanak's Sidh Gosti, followed by Bavan Akhari and Sukhmani by Guru Arjan (1563–1606). Since the 'Adi Granth' is so large, it was usual to make manuscript selections for private devotion.

Each hymn begins with a full-page coloured illustration, and is beautifully written in Gurmukhi with white letters and embellishments on a black background.

The opening shown here (digitised image 1) is the beginning of Guru Nanak's Sidh Gosti. The illustration depicts Guru Nanak as a young man, disputing with the Sidhs. In the second image displayed here illustrates Guru Nanak with Mardana and Bala.

Guru Nanak was the founder of Sikhism and the first of the 10 Sikh Gurus. Their teachings are compiled in the Adi Granth or the Guru Granth Sahib, the holy scripture of Sikhism and the final Sikh Guru. It is always placed in the centre of the Gurdwara (place of worship), on a raised platform, and is treated with the greatest respect by all Sikhs"

 

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1 hour ago, Wicked Warrior said:

Whilst it hurts me that Sikh treasures like this have been taken, in some ways, they may well be looked after better than if they were in India. If they were kept in a Gurdwara or museum in India, at some point, they may end up being destroyed or tampered.

Umm already bro. 

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I agree that they take care of historical artifacts a lot better than they do in India but when it comes to Gutka Sahibs like the one above then it should not be stored in a library or museum, thats not right. 

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3 hours ago, Redoptics said:

Wow that would be so hard to read no separation between words, its constant flow.

Yh its larivaar  that's how old sikhs used to write. Old Guru Granth Sahibs were written like that. 

I think it was written like that so people who were against sikhi and wanted to change the gurus word it became impossible for them to do that.  

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10 minutes ago, puzzled said:

Yh its larivaar  that's how old sikhs used to write. Old Guru Granth Sahibs were written like that. 

I think it was written like that so people who were against sikhi and wanted to change the gurus word it became impossible for them to do that.  

So again we are changing things of the Gurus, do we really think we know more than them.

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25 minutes ago, GurjantGnostic said:

A digital copy of a larivaar Saroop with an md5 checksum with a verified Gurmukhi, transliterated, translated section afterwords would be nice. Sort of a digital way to help protect Saroop. 

Whats a 'md5 checksum'???

I've never been a fan of transliterations myself. Do you think that they help you with pronunciation? 

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2 hours ago, puzzled said:

Yh its larivaar  that's how old sikhs used to write. Old Guru Granth Sahibs were written like that. 

I think it was written like that so people who were against sikhi and wanted to change the gurus word it became impossible for them to do that.  

Yep, and we've got over a crucial period now, where those attempts to subvert have been successfully thwarted.

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36 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

Whats a 'md5 checksum'???

I've never been a fan of transliterations myself. Do you think that they help you with pronunciation? 

It's like a file fingerprint to authinticate if a file is the original without tampering. 

Being ignorant of Punjabi I feel the transliterations help with being able to learn the Grumukhi. It's like a rosetta stone almost. 

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18 minutes ago, GurjantGnostic said:

If you knew an Ang in 7 languages you'd actually know a certain and appreciable amount of grammar and syntax of all 7 languages. And the most important vocab. That pertaining to Gurbani. 

Thing with Gurmukhi (compared to English/Roman) is that it has strict grapheme (the visual symbol or letter) and phoneme (the sound associated with that letter/symbol) mapping. That's why I think Gurmukhi can be easier because you can generally only pronounce a word one way.  

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