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Sri Guru Granth Sahib in 53 languages

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The Guru Granth Sahib is the central religious text of Sikhi (Sikhism), believed to be the divine words of God to guide humanity through this life. It is considered by Sikhs to be their eternal Guru or teacher. It contains the baani (words) and shabads (hymns) spoken by the Sikh Gurus and bhagats (saints) from other religions who also shared the same core message.

The standardized version of the Guru Granth Sahib is written over 1430 pages (angs). It is divided into sections containing the words of the Gurus and Bhagats in the form of poetry (baani). Music forms an integral part of Sikhi as it provides a color (raag) to the words, giving them important emotional and spiritual context.

This is a visually minimalistic website to explore the Guru Granth Sahib

Currently on version v0.6

http://granth.co/1

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I wish there were more Indian languages too though, like South Indian Dravidian languages, Bengali, etc. Still it's very good.

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4 hours ago, AjeetSingh2019 said:

I just checked hindi version. Sorry but the translation is wrong in so many places :/ 

this is the thing how can we make sure that the other cultures get the true glimpse of gurbani to inspire investigation into learning further if the translations are not verified against gurbani, with working between scholars  and language experts ?

I mean the english translation contains the wrong arth of sochi soch na hove , je sochi lakh vaar , just a first instance .

 

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38 minutes ago, jkvlondon said:

this is the thing how can we make sure that the other cultures get the true glimpse of gurbani to inspire investigation into learning further if the translations are not verified against gurbani, with working between scholars  and language experts ?

I mean the english translation contains the wrong arth of sochi soch na hove , je sochi lakh vaar , just a first instance .

 

gurbani has multiple levels of meaning.

for instance : 

from sukhmani sahib ashtapadi 1 : "prabh kae simran pooran aasa" 

what does it mean ? most would say it means "remembering god, one's desires are fulfilled in the sense one gets what one wants"

deeper meaning is "remembering god, one's desires are fulfilled (without getting thing) and no more desires are left, hence 'pooran aasa'' 

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