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Singhni and have no friends!


Guest alonekaur

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Guest alonekaur

I feel quite down. I am in my 20's and have no singhnia friends. I want good sangat, however no singhni in the midlands has really been approachable. You have to be popular to be noticed. Everyone has their own cliques and don't allow anyone else in them. I feel really lonley and upset. Any bani i can read?

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Hi there...you are making quite a strong statement..."no Singhni in the midlands has really been approachable"..... I am wondering if you are approaching the Singnis with the right strategy and the right attitude (sorry, for being little judgmental) or if you are approaching the right Singhnis!!!! And if you are approaching the right Singhnis in the right way and still your effort is going in vain, then my dear friend.....just wait for the right time as per God's schedule...kyonki, uske marzi ke bina patta bhi nahi hilta!!!!

Good-luck...

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  • 2 weeks later...

maharaj kept me alone for a number of years and i became used to it. i found feelings of loneliness could be eased by attending divan daily. it helps a great deal in your spiritual life. perhaps you would be best off if you focused on building up your jeevan and doing some seva? this way the worry about meeting people could be lessened and you might meet friends through seva.

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Being alone does not bother me so much, althou it does hurt when nobody cares or asks, but not being able participate in sangat and to go to the gurdwara bothers me more than anything. So I will say to those that have their health and are able to do that, make the most of it, and go to gurdwara, do seva, go and sit in divan, listen to kirtan, as u are so lucky u are given this opportunity, grab it with both hands. One place where u will never be alone is the gurdwara, and dont worry about having no friends, they come and go, and believe me the friends i had, were not friends, otherwise they would be here now.

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Too many friends are a distraction to anyone's ''self development''

Self Development and spiritual development is what sikhi is about.

Don't worry, the time will pass and it is all his hukam.

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