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Sikh Population In Punjab Is 57 % Which Was 60% In 2001 Census.


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As per Govt of India Census 2011 released yesterday ,Sikh population in Punjab is 57 % which was 60% in 2001 census.


The growth rate of population in the decade 2001-2011 was 17.7 percent. The growth rate of population of the different religious communities in the same period was as Hindus: 16.8 percent; Muslim: 24.6 percent; Christian: 15.5 percent; Sikh: 8.4 percent; Buddhist: 6.1 percent and Jain: 5.4 percent.


http://www.censusindia.gov.in/2011census/C-01.html

http://www.firstpost.com/india/indi...ims-2011-census-data-on-religion-2407708.html

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Quantavius bro we already have such an organisation in place - the SGPC. The problem is it is riddled by corruption so we have to peacefully seize back control or set-up a parallel organisation which

When you factor in the massive amount of Indian labourers we Sikhs ourselves have had to bring in to Punjab to work our fields and the massive amount of Sikh emigration to places such as Canada, Ameri

StarStriker bro if you look at the link on Hrman Singh's OP the link for figures is available there. I'm not quite sure about if 80% of Haryana becoming Sikh would have been realistically achievable

When you factor in the massive amount of Indian labourers we Sikhs ourselves have had to bring in to Punjab to work our fields and the massive amount of Sikh emigration to places such as Canada, America and Italy (and to a smaller extent UK) from Punjab in the last decade I think we have to look at the tiny 3% drop in our population and be quite relieved and admit that it isn't half as bad as we feared. Could have been alot worse. So, in actual fact, a very positive result. No need for negativity at all on this thread.

But if same 3% decline per decade trend continues then in few decades Sikhs will in minority in Punjab .Our birth rate is also lowest in country .

""Sikh emigration to places such as Canada, America and Italy (and to a smaller extent UK) from Punjab in the last decade""

you must also add Australia ,Newzeland for last decade .

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Theres also the brain drain, given that Punjab has had highish education levels, loads of people who can have left the punjab to other parts of India or gone abroad. Lets not forget things like the skewing of males/females in punjab which is a demographic timebomb that is now producing fruit. Historically its the mum's who pass on sikhi, fewer sikh mums = less sikhi.

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Guest Jacfsing2

There is a few factors that you may have forgot, such as the mass migration of Sikh people to wherever? Whether that's still in India or abroad to somewhere where they can be successful. Second, a census only works with the people asked, there may be many otherwise Sikh villages that they just didn't take the Census for whatever reason. Finally, there is less of the message of Guru Sahib's message within Punjab.

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.Second, a census only works with the people asked, there may be many otherwise Sikh villages that they just didn't take the Census for whatever reason..

My Mom as a govt employee was involved in this census , not even a single house was left out ,they were told to visit again if any house was locked

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Guest Jacfsing2

My Mom as a govt employee was involved in this census , not even a single house was left out ,they were told to visit again if any house was locked

You also seem to be forgetting that many Indians are homeless, many of them could be Sikhs. I know how Censuses work.
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Here is a suggestion

Create a world Sikh organization group. Seek donations from Sikhs all over the world. Use the funds to help those in Punjab. The help can be in the form of welfare for poor families, some kind of credit for having a child, hospitals, universities, technical colleges, buy up land and create corporate farming....etc, etc. Make Punjab a great place to live. That way they will stay.

If each and every Sikh around the world donated USD 50 bucks a month, that would be a very huge amount.

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