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Guest Kaur5

Food of the Ancestors

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Guest Kaur5

Hi

i was wondering if anyone had information on what people from the wider Punjab (india and Pakistan) originally ate? Has the diet changed much from say great-grandparents? I’m trying to figure out if we in the western world should still primarily and only consume the same food of our ancestors? Given that we have access to so many other cuisines should we not be still only consuming what we need based on our make-up (DNA)? General rule being if your grandparents or great-grandparents wouldn’t recognise it, don’t eat it? 

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5 hours ago, Guest Kaur5 said:

Hi

i was wondering if anyone had information on what people from the wider Punjab (india and Pakistan) originally ate? Has the diet changed much from say great-grandparents? I’m trying to figure out if we in the western world should still primarily and only consume the same food of our ancestors? Given that we have access to so many other cuisines should we not be still only consuming what we need based on our make-up (DNA)? General rule being if your grandparents or great-grandparents wouldn’t recognise it, don’t eat it? 

Roti, Roti and Roti

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Their work ethic (both sexes) also played a considerable role in their health. The food they ate -- some of which contemporary people would deride as fatty or too rich -- provided them with the necessary energy to do all they did, with very little of the potential side effects from eating such food manifesting itself as weight gain or other potential health problems. Of course, modern agricultural practices and general lifestyle issues must be taken into account if we're discussing this problem as it relates to contemporary society.

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18 hours ago, Guest Kaur5 said:

Hi

i was wondering if anyone had information on what people from the wider Punjab (india and Pakistan) originally ate? Has the diet changed much from say great-grandparents? I’m trying to figure out if we in the western world should still primarily and only consume the same food of our ancestors? Given that we have access to so many other cuisines should we not be still only consuming what we need based on our make-up (DNA)? General rule being if your grandparents or great-grandparents wouldn’t recognise it, don’t eat it? 

You should read South Asian Health Solution by Dr Ron Sinha. 

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On 6/2/2018 at 3:31 PM, Guest Kaur5 said:

Hi

i was wondering if anyone had information on what people from the wider Punjab (india and Pakistan) originally ate? Has the diet changed much from say great-grandparents? I’m trying to figure out if we in the western world should still primarily and only consume the same food of our ancestors? Given that we have access to so many other cuisines should we not be still only consuming what we need based on our make-up (DNA)? General rule being if your grandparents or great-grandparents wouldn’t recognise it, don’t eat it? 

Thats a great idea! And the dna thing is true. They found out that ppl from south india whos ancestors have been vegetarians for centuries, lack this one enzyme to break down saturated fat. So if they start eating meat. They are at more risk for health issues. 

And research has also shown that japanese ppl, when they migrated to hawaii. The older generation who ate traditional food had no diabetes etc  but the younger generation who ate american food did. 

So i think we do need to eat wat our ancestors ate. One thing to note is that, they ate very coarse grinded stuff. Like our rice and wheat is so finely grounded/polished. Its not healthy. 

Also, lots of foods have been added. There was no potato, corn, tomato, or tea in panjab. These were imported from america and china..

So can u imagine sabji without aalo or tamatar? And like maki di roti is also fake or at least a recent addition. 

Also, ppl are learning that fats r good to eat. Carbs cause diabetes cuz they spike up ur blood glucose levels and get u insulin resistance. So fats like khoa, butter, makhani, paneer are very good. Also ppl back in the day, ate more protein, and less sugar and fruit as they were expensive and not grown at home. Mostly it was daal and saag. Greens and protein...

Ofc exercise does play a role.

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2 hours ago, Not2Cool2Argue said:

Thats a great idea! And the dna thing is true. They found out that ppl from south india whos ancestors have been vegetarians for centuries, lack this one enzyme to break down saturated fat. So if they start eating meat. They are at more risk for health issues. 

And research has also shown that japanese ppl, when they migrated to hawaii. The older generation who ate traditional food had no diabetes etc  but the younger generation who ate american food did. 

So i think we do need to eat wat our ancestors ate. One thing to note is that, they ate very coarse grinded stuff. Like our rice and wheat is so finely grounded/polished. Its not healthy. 

Also, lots of foods have been added. There was no potato, corn, tomato, or tea in panjab. These were imported from america and china..

So can u imagine sabji without aalo or tamatar? And like maki di roti is also fake or at least a recent addition. 

Also, ppl are learning that fats r good to eat. Carbs cause diabetes cuz they spike up ur blood glucose levels and get u insulin resistance. So fats like khoa, butter, makhani, paneer are very good. Also ppl back in the day, ate more protein, and less sugar and fruit as they were expensive and not grown at home. Mostly it was daal and saag. Greens and protein...

Ofc exercise does play a role.

ok so asli saag in purataan times would use what as aalan , besan? it's also important to remember mirccha were only black pepper from south not chillis from americas , I have noted thatthere are  varieties our people are extremely allergic to , i cannot eat jalapeno without triggering pain response in gi tract , pickled less problematic , my mum was in ER after makin sabji with scotch bonnet withextreme reaction but she used to eat green mirch raw as a teen in India.

Paneer is actually not that fattening in itself it only becomes problematic when deep fried.

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1 hour ago, jkvlondon said:

ok so asli saag in purataan times would use what as aalan , besan? it's also important to remember mirccha were only black pepper from south not chillis from americas , I have noted thatthere are  varieties our people are extremely allergic to , i cannot eat jalapeno without triggering pain response in gi tract , pickled less problematic , my mum was in ER after makin sabji with scotch bonnet withextreme reaction but she used to eat green mirch raw as a teen in India.

 

They still make original saag in jalandhar/amritsar area. They use shole de daal. They add it in the saag. But my nani says their saag is watery. But besan is a good idea. Tho idk if it would be as good as corn as corn as starch. 

Are u sure abt the mircha not being indigineous to india? Because currently india and mexico produce the hottest peppers in the world. And south indians use it safti in their traditional foods for tempering dosa etc. and we have mircha da chaar. 

That is mindblowing. 

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9 hours ago, Not2Cool2Argue said:

They still make original saag in jalandhar/amritsar area. They use shole de daal. They add it in the saag. But my nani says their saag is watery. But besan is a good idea. Tho idk if it would be as good as corn as corn as starch. 

Are u sure abt the mircha not being indigineous to india? Because currently india and mexico produce the hottest peppers in the world. And south indians use it safti in their traditional foods for tempering dosa etc. and we have mircha da chaar. 

That is mindblowing. 

https://www.legalnomads.com/history-chili-peppers/

https://spicyquest.com/where-are-chili-peppers-from/

although all limes stem from punjab region , went to spain were cross bred with oranges from china and became the yellow lemons goray use , this crisscrossing was done by colonists ...

Edited by jkvlondon

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12 hours ago, jkvlondon said:

https://www.legalnomads.com/history-chili-peppers/

https://spicyquest.com/where-are-chili-peppers-from/

although all limes stem from punjab region , went to spain were cross bred with oranges from china and became the yellow lemons goray use , this crisscrossing was done by colonists ...

Wow so skanjmi is an original authentic drink of panjab lol

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2 hours ago, Not2Cool2Argue said:

Wow so skanjmi is an original authentic drink of panjab lol

Yep (prof google concurs) in full as sugarcane is indigenous  to south east asia

Edited by jkvlondon

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On 6/6/2018 at 11:20 PM, Not2Cool2Argue said:

One thing to note is that, they ate very coarse grinded stuff. Like our rice and wheat is so finely grounded/polished. Its not healthy.

Think it's another western comfort...dough is easy for us to knead now but wonder how damage is done to the texture and nutrition if what we use now isn't cooked properly... it seems like it can stick to the gut like glue and ferment, causing digestion problems with less bulky stools.

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I've heard dalia has always been consumed a lot in ancient Punjab, even back to the times of the Indus Valley. I think it's called bulghur wheat in English.

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6 hours ago, TejS said:

I've heard dalia has always been consumed a lot in ancient Punjab, even back to the times of the Indus Valley. I think it's called bulghur wheat in English.

I still remember my first punjabi dalia different

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DNA of populations changes slowly over thousands of years. Food genetics over a mass market can change within weeks. For example your average apple today is completely different to one from a decade ago or say 40yrs ago. Modern apples are sweeter and designed for shelf life and mass transportation. That daal you eat today is a different pulse to the one eaten by your ancestors (green Revolution and modern GM techniques). Same goes for all foods unless you are talking about fish from the sea which haven't been genetically altered (farm fish have). So that's the dirty secret of many of today's ills our genes are designed for food types over thousands of years but now our bodies are exposed to different foods from around the world and the food we think we are used to is actually alien to our genes.

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