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very Random Historical Photographs


Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh
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Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh

1) Not so random

Sikhs bathing on banks of River Auja near Jaffa in Israel (Palestine) where they built the bridge in 1918:

Indian troops of the 7th (Meerut) Division bathing in the River Auja, Summer 1918.

 

Sikhs guarding Baghdad Railway Station in Iraq in 1918:

Indian troops guarding Baghdad railway station.

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Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh

2) very random

1980 - Apnian auntian and uncles at their picket lines during the patient shaft strike (Smethwick / wednesbury / west brom way)

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3) A Century of Humanitarianism in just 2 photos - Sikh handing rations to starving minority Christian girls in Iraq circa 1918 and Sikhs handing rations to starving minority Yazedi girls in Iraq circa 2018

 

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1 hour ago, Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh said:

2) very random

1980 - Apnian auntian and uncles at their picket lines during the patient shaft strike (Smethwick / wednesbury / west brom way)

Related image

Related image

 

3) A Century of Humanitarianism in just 2 photos - Sikh handing rations to starving minority Christian girls in Iraq circa 1918 and Sikhs handing rations to starving minority Yazedi girls in Iraq circa 2018

 

Related image

 

I don't think this guy is a Sikh. They don't normally wear those cone things in their turbans. 

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Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh

Indian troops of the 7th (Meerut) Division bathing in the River Auja, Summer 1918.

 

I wanna come back to this photo actually because in an obscure roundabout way the story behind the photo does tell us something about the current Israel / Palestine problem. The obscure narrative is that a) Israel needs to regain it's humanity and stop treating Palestinians as sub-human and b) Muslims around the world need to understand that it is the Jews that have built Israel and the vast majority of Palestinian Muslims do not belong there. The Palestinians of Gaza are, as everybody knows, Egyptian anyway but even up to 80% of the rest of the Palestinians only entered that land relatively recently from neighbouring lands after the Jews had started to farm barren and neglected land and provide prosperity in that land that lay neglected for centuries. When the Sikhs such as the ones in the photo were there building bridges in the early 1900s you could actually walk for hours before seeing another soul and absolutely nothing was grown. It was a wasteland. So this notion of the Palestinians being on that land for centuries is a false narrative. Most of them came later when the Jews started building something worth coming to. In that sense, we must be true and good supporters of Israel because we must see something of ourselves in them. They have right on their side but they must realise that dehumanising others actually dehumanises them and draws attention away from that 'rightness'. Muslims, for their part, must realise that it is, and always has been, a Jewish land.

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46 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

I don't think this guy is a Sikh. They don't normally wear those cone things in their turbans. 

I actually agree with you there. I'm about 60% certain it's probably not a Sikh. Anyway, I found it on Khalsa Aid's website facebook thingy so take it up with them.

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On 4/10/2019 at 4:19 PM, Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh said:

1) Not so random

Sikhs bathing on banks of River Auja near Jaffa in Israel (Palestine) where they built the bridge in 1918:

Indian troops of the 7th (Meerut) Division bathing in the River Auja, Summer 1918.

 

Sikhs guarding Baghdad Railway Station in Iraq in 1918:

Indian troops guarding Baghdad railway station.

Lean muscle and no pot bellies in the first pic.

What an embarrassment we have become.

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1 hour ago, Ranjeet01 said:

Lean muscle and no pot bellies in the first pic.

What an embarrassment we have become.

That's the first thing I noticed, them guys were naturally in shape and look very healthy , the guy at the bottom corner smiling has toned arms and stomach.

Think diet is a big thing, they ate healthy,  we eat stuff filled with sugar and salt 

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2 hours ago, Ranjeet01 said:

Lean muscle and no pot bellies in the first pic.

What an embarrassment we have become.

super_000000.jpg

Note all the current obsession with light skin. These geezers are as black as some

Africans.The one on the right could pass for Aboriginal. 

And people should speak for themselves......no pot belly here.....lol

 

58 minutes ago, puzzled said:

That's the first thing I noticed, them guys were naturally in shape and look very healthy , the guy at the bottom corner smiling has toned arms and stomach.

Think diet is a big thing, they ate healthy,  we eat stuff filled with sugar and salt 

I think it's actually more about physical activity. I was looking at the Falcon regimental guide and I was pretty shocked to see that the diet had not changed much in over hundred years. Basically my parent's generation was eating pretty similar (if not identical) to what was a normal rural Panjabi diet a hundred and thirty odd years ago. 

I think the lack of sun and heat in the west also plays a big part in not only our skin colour, but also our biological processes with vit D. 

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1 hour ago, puzzled said:

That's the first thing I noticed, them guys were naturally in shape and look very healthy , the guy at the bottom corner smiling has toned arms and stomach.

Think diet is a big thing, they ate healthy,  we eat stuff filled with sugar and salt 

They were far more active, did physically hard work.

Their diet consisted of having 2 meals a day. Two phulkeh and dal with some a clump of butter. They got most of their nutrients and were satiated enough to snack and overeat. 

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Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh
On 4/16/2019 at 10:23 PM, dallysingh101 said:

super_000000.jpg

 

 

I think it's actually more about physical activity. I was looking at the Falcon regimental guide and I was pretty shocked to see that the diet had not changed much in over hundred years. Basically my parent's generation was eating pretty similar (if not identical) to what was a normal rural Panjabi diet a hundred and thirty odd years ago. 

 

Yes physical activity is the key thing here but the rural Punjab diet has changed alot. A hellava lot. One example is how the superfood Alsi (flaxseed) used be habitually added to most daals and sabjian whereas Punjabis today, whilst sometimes adding it to their pinnia', mostly use it as a feeder to bulk up cows. 

One day, hopefully, someone here will dig up all of my old threads here on this forum and, instead of throwing abuse my way, will actually appreciate the things I have written. On one thread I created, a long time ago, I stated how, on a visit to Kiratpur Sahib, I asked the sevadars there for details about what plants Sri Guru Har Rai planted in his beautiful garden there. My intention was to make a list and then research them when I get back home. One in particular absolutely blew me away, especially when I discovered how it had become a daily staple of the diet of the Sikhs in that period. Absolutely blew me away.

The Moringa

The leaves of this tree, which is actually native to the Punjab, provide so much goodness that it is almost difficult to believe that it could be true: 

An amazing amount of antioxidants to help prevent diabetes and heart disease.

Compounds to to lower blood pressure and cholestorol

9 times more protein than yoghurt

3 times more vitamin A than carrots

12 times more vitamin C than oranges

15 times more potassium than bananas

25 times more iron than spinach

17 times more calcium than milk

 

Somewhere along the line - at some point in our history - we have chosen to forget the natural secrets of life we knew - changed our diet, and are now suffering the consequences.

 

 

 

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