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2 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

Any experienced cat owners here?  By that I mean you've owned a cat for 5 years +

Have a question or two for you about your experience. 

I don't have cats now, but have had off and on my whole life. What's up veer ji?

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Just now, dallysingh101 said:

Did it used to throw up food? 

And then come back for more a few hours later? 

Yep. They're pure carnivors that eat a lot of their own hair. If they eat something on a hunt they may very well regurgitate it for later. Get used to the sound of cats heaving.  

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On 8/27/2021 at 12:49 AM, GurjantGnostic said:

Yep. They're pure carnivors that eat a lot of their own hair. If they eat something on a hunt they may very well regurgitate it for later. Get used to the sound of cats heaving.  

Are you thinking of getting rescue cats ?

This story made me sad

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tees-58330636

 

Blind cats seek home after Peterlee rescue

Published
4 days ago
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The cats cuddles togetherIMAGE SOURCERSPCA
image captionArthur and Gabriel were rescued from a builder's yard in Peterlee last December

Two blind cats who were rescued from the streets at Christmas are seeking a new home.

The RSPCA found the feral kittens, who have been named Gabriel and Arthur, in a builder's yard in Peterlee.

Both have had their eyes removed after suffering the effects of cat flu, the charity said.

"They are now available to be rehomed but sadly have had little interest so far," RSPCA rehoming co-ordinator Sophie Moran-Barker said.

She said: "Arthur and Gabriel are adorable, friendly and loving kittens who, after all they have been through, really deserve to find themselves a special home.

"We worry that potential adopters have been put off because the kittens lost their eyes but being blind does not stop them from leading a full and exciting life.

"Arthur and Gabriel will need to be rehomed as indoor cats together due to their lack of sight but they're quite independent.

"Once they have settled in and get used to their surroundings they are really like any other playful kittens."

The cats, who were about 14 weeks old when they were rescued, are currently at the RSPCA's centre in Darlington.

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Basically, if the cat throws up undigested food (that looks the same as it did going in), it's probably because they've wolfed it down too quickly. 

You have to slow them down with the eating. I found stopping them every few bites helps. 

I have to say: seeing a regurgitated rat was gross. lol!

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  • 4 weeks later...

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-59322766

Missing cat Big Ginge reunited with Birmingham couple after 10 years

Published
5 hours ago
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Big GingeIMAGE SOURCE,COLIN CLAYTON
Image caption,
Big Ginge is now back at home on Colin Clayton and Eva Bellamy's narrowboat

A couple have been reunited with their cat 10 years after he went missing from their narrowboat.

Big Ginge was last seen by owners Colin Clayton and Eva Bellamy in 2011 while on their honeymoon near Fradley Junction - 25 miles from their Birmingham home.

Despite usually hopping on and off the boat, he disappeared and the couple registered him as missing.

They were shocked to receive a call to say he had been found in Staffordshire.

The couple's three cats, Weasel and her offspring Diesel and Big Ginge, then three, were used to living on the canal and went on and off the boat.

Mr Clayton said there had "never been an issue" with the cats finding their way home and then the other two cats came back without Big Ginge.

The couple stayed another five days searching before registering him as missing on his microchip.

Big GingeIMAGE SOURCE,COLIN CLAYTON/CATS PROTECTION
Image caption,
Big Ginge's identity was revealed thanks to a microchip implanted when he was young

Earlier this year, Cats Protection, Lichfield and Tamworth branch, said the team became aware of a stray in Lichfield, who they nicknamed Marmalade.

Sue Hocknell from the branch said: "Over time a local man fed him and gradually Marmalade began to trust him.

"I then got a call to say Marmalade had ventured into his flat and that he had a lump on his flank.

"I managed to get a quick vet appointment and that's when we discovered his true identity."

Canal boatIMAGE SOURCE,COLIN CLAYTON
Image caption,
The cat went missing while the couple were on their honeymoon near Fradley Junction

The lump was not found to be serious and Big Ginge is now back in his original home, but mystery surrounds where he has been over the last decade.

Mr Clayton added: "For now we will be keeping him indoors.

"Big Ginge has had enough stress in his life and we are confident it will all work out."

 
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From BMJ

https://www.bmj.com/rapid-response/2011/11/01/cats-are-very-intuitive-and-sensitive

Cats are very intuitive and sensitive.

 

When I was working as a Geriatrician, when we still had long stay
beds in our hospitals, we had hospital cats at our main hospital and at
three peripheral ones. We noticed how often the cats would choose to sleep
on the beds of patients who were terminally ill. We thought this could be
because these patients did not move around so much, but after reading the
fascinating News item about Oscar the cat, I now think it may have been an
intuitive desire to give some sort of comfort to the patients who were
dying. I have experienced a friend's normally aloof cat which never sat on
laps, which came up to me and sat on my lap all afternoon when I was
distressed, and my own cats have always known when I was ill.

The nurses in one of our hospitals were concerned that patients and
relatives would be distressed by the cat's choosing to sleep on the beds
of patients who later died, so we had to rehome that cat. It is good to
read in your article that the "cat on the bed sign" was taken as a
positive and helpful marker rather than a negative one, and helped staff
members to prepare the familes for the impending death of the patient. Why
are we always so negative in this country? And why shy away from an
inevitable death? So much better to face it simply, pragmatically and
realistically, like animals do.
Eventually all our hospital cats were rehomed on health and safety
grounds, despite the fact that most patients loved having them there, and
of course soon after, all the long stay beds went too, but I am glad to
know that Nursing Homes still sometimes allow animals. We have so much in
common with animals, not least our mortality, and they have a way of
communicating which is beyond our usual ways and which we humans have
lost. They are far more intuitive than we realise, and more sensible too.

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6 minutes ago, Premi5 said:

From BMJ

https://www.bmj.com/rapid-response/2011/11/01/cats-are-very-intuitive-and-sensitive

Cats are very intuitive and sensitive.

 

When I was working as a Geriatrician, when we still had long stay
beds in our hospitals, we had hospital cats at our main hospital and at
three peripheral ones. We noticed how often the cats would choose to sleep
on the beds of patients who were terminally ill. We thought this could be
because these patients did not move around so much, but after reading the
fascinating News item about Oscar the cat, I now think it may have been an
intuitive desire to give some sort of comfort to the patients who were
dying. I have experienced a friend's normally aloof cat which never sat on
laps, which came up to me and sat on my lap all afternoon when I was
distressed, and my own cats have always known when I was ill.

The nurses in one of our hospitals were concerned that patients and
relatives would be distressed by the cat's choosing to sleep on the beds
of patients who later died, so we had to rehome that cat. It is good to
read in your article that the "cat on the bed sign" was taken as a
positive and helpful marker rather than a negative one, and helped staff
members to prepare the familes for the impending death of the patient. Why
are we always so negative in this country? And why shy away from an
inevitable death? So much better to face it simply, pragmatically and
realistically, like animals do.
Eventually all our hospital cats were rehomed on health and safety
grounds, despite the fact that most patients loved having them there, and
of course soon after, all the long stay beds went too, but I am glad to
know that Nursing Homes still sometimes allow animals. We have so much in
common with animals, not least our mortality, and they have a way of
communicating which is beyond our usual ways and which we humans have
lost. They are far more intuitive than we realise, and more sensible too.

A close pal told me that when he had an operation and had to be bedridden for a while, the cat at his grandmother's house (where he was staying at the time) all of a sudden started sleeping under his bed.  She'd never done that before and he'd lived there for a couple of years before this. 

It's a fascinating topic. 

Plus look how long they can survive on their own when they go missing.  

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