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People Who Claim They Died And Came Back After Visiting Dharam Raj'S Court


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I find that Giani Takhur Singh Ji has this brilliant talent for adding a bit of humour into his Katha, at exactly the right time!

It's so subtle, but so funny. Giani Ji is very deep and knowledgeable but also understands that the general public (like me) need a bit of humour to give us a mental break and keep us interested.

The other 'gem' from Giani Takhur Singh Ji's Katha of Japji Sahib Ji is the Saki about greed. It's the one about the man who's told that if he goes so deep into the jungle he will find a pressure material, but not to go any further. The man's greed makes him go further and further, it's a great ending... this is Giani Takhur singh Ji's humour at it's best !!!

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i have heard many people talking about their relatives and friends that they became alive after they were dead and they usually tell that jamdoots took them by mistake

my grandmother had this experience when she was 12 years old, She described the yamdoot as dark with long nails and sharp teeth holding her very tightly. She also told how she couldnt speak but kept trying to shout at them to let her go. She was walking with them for a long time over green fields, eventually being told that the Yamdoots had brought the wrong "pooro" (my grans name) and was released. At that time she woke and her fmaily were preparing for her funeral. Then the family heard a few days later that a pooro in a neighbouring village had died in young age.

Giani Thakur Singh also says that according to the life of a Sikh, etc if he is a good Sikh, a Singh will come to get him, not yamdoot. For Sikhs of high avastha, 5 Singhs will come to get them.

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my grandmother had this experience when she was 12 years old, She described the yamdoot as dark with long nails and sharp teeth holding her very tightly. She also told how she couldnt speak but kept trying to shout at them to let her go. She was walking with them for a long time over green fields, eventually being told that the Yamdoots had brought the wrong "pooro" (my grans name) and was released. At that time she woke and her fmaily were preparing for her funeral. Then the family heard a few days later that a pooro in a neighbouring village had died in young age.

Giani Thakur Singh also says that according to the life of a Sikh, etc if he is a good Sikh, a Singh will come to get him, not yamdoot. For Sikhs of high avastha, 5 Singhs will come to get them.

yup to add to that when you have the avasha of a sant/braimgyani mahapurkh Guru Gobind Singh Himself comes to get you :waheguru: :L:

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I'm being deadly serious, but how do the yamdoots make a mistake when coming for a person?

Breakdown in communication, admin issues, system failures etc etc! You just can't get the right calibre of staff nowadays!

Maybe we're just better off getting on with our lives...

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I think the problem is in the old system with Dharamraj with huge book looking into details

He needs to go hi tech everything should be monitored online

i m pretty sure our indian software firms can help Dharamraj so that yamdoots don't make any mistakes

maybe yamdoots can be provided with eye scanners to make sure that they catch the right guy

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Breakdown in communication, admin issues, system failures etc etc! You just can't get the right calibre of staff nowadays!

Maybe we're just better off getting on with our lives...

I think the problem is in the old system with Dharamraj with huge book looking into details

He needs to go hi tech everything should be monitored online

i m pretty sure our indian software firms can help Dharamraj so that yamdoots don't make any mistakes

maybe yamdoots can be provided with eye scanners to make sure that they catch the right guy

STOP SHOWING UR HUMOROUS SKILLS HERE WITH USELESS REPLIES

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Such incidents relate to spiritual domain. PLease do not bring science into it. The following i sgood article by Brig Hardit singh

a noted writer on religious issues.

http://www.sikhstudies.org/Periodicals.asp?TtlCod=392

Periodicals

April 1999

Articles

By Brig. Hardit Singh Kapur (Retd.)

DEATH AND AFTER — SOME PERSONAL REFLECTIONS —

HARDIT SINGH

Over countless centuries, world religions and psychologists have been speculating on what lies beyond death. No one has given a clear answer except for offering a variety of choices. The Western idea, which encompasses Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, hovers around the Day of Judgement, Resurrection, and Heaven and Hell. The Eastern religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, etc., theorise on transmigration and karmic philosophy.

In this paper, I shall discuss this question based on some of my personal observations and experiences.Human beings have a mortal body and an immortal soul (atma), which is a speck of the Divine Soul (Parmatma). While the soul is the core, the mind is its outer garb which manifests itself at birth and takes control of the body. The mind is the product of maya, so, is vagrant and mischievous, but essential to foster individual personality. Psychologists maintain that the mind is connected to the brain and soul to the heart. What the mind does or thinks, casts reflection on both the body and the soul. The body is diseased and the soul soiled. The mind with its agents (sense organs) disappears or dies with the body, but the poor soul has to bear consequences of the mind’s misdeeds in the next world. Since the mind is the culprit, all the religious instructions are meant to tame it. The conflict between the mind and the soul can be compared to that of a fight between a demon and a god. For that matter the whole universe is based on conflicting factors such as pain and pleasure, happiness and sadness, good and bad, etc. This is the law of nature which can also be termed as His play.

Like the water which rushes down the hills, valleys, and plains to merge with its master — the ocean, soul also yearns to meet its Prime-Soul. The human body is the place where the soul is closest to its objective, but it is separated from it by a wall of falsehood (koor di pal). This wall can be dismantled through loving remembrance of God and service of His creation. Our deeds, after death, will be adjudged as to how far the soul has traversed its distance away or towards its goal. Nothing else, including riches, status, or even religious affiliations shall be of any avail. In this court, there is no Hindu, Muslim, or Sikh. Human life is thus a rare opportunity that comes for attaining closeness to God. Besides, human life is not only head of all the world species, but is also bestowed with discriminating brain and faculties to improve his lot and to render service to others.

We are alive when the soul abides in our body. The moment it departs the body collapses. This is what death is. Death is certain and ordained. No one can escape its clutches. Every human being is destined to live a certain number of days and breaths and not the age. These numbers cannot be increased or decreased. One can, however, prolong life by maintaining his equipoise under all circumstances. Lust, anger, greed, attachment, ego and fast life (hurry, worry, tension, and indulgence) tend to quicken the breathing tempo. Ancient yogis lived long lives as they could control their breath. Death will only come when the allotted number of breaths is used up.

My young uncle, a very pious and saintly soul, suddenly died and woke up after a few minutes. He told the gathered family members that his namesake from the same village was to die instead. Lo, wails and cries were heard at that time from a nearby house where another Surjan Singh died. A dying person is visited by either messengers of death (yamas) or angels according to one’s bad or good deeds. The yamas drag out the human spirit mercilessly whereas the noble souls are honourably led by angels. During the 1962 Chinese aggression, my wife, while siting out in Jorhat (Assam) saw four or five yamas dashing past her and within seconds one of our aircrafts exploded in the air killing the sole pilot known to us. My wife described the yamas as “tall, almost touching the sky, with ugly and dreadful features”. Their body and features particularly hands and feet are disproportionately large. On the other hand, a very pious, saintly and dear friend of mine at Jalandhar had warned his wife of his approaching end. After about a month, he exclaimed that a party of Sikhs singing shabads with Sant Baba Jawala Singh of Harkhowal at their head, were entering his room to take him away. The above saint had left this world about ten years earlier and was our godfather. The noble soul said good-bye to his family, bowed reverently to the holy spirits and closed his eye.

Late Bhai Vir Singh, a great mystic, novelist, and poet had published a small tract early in his life narrating a dream of his death. Bhai Sahib found himself in the other world where he met some people who talked about purifying him. They lit a pyre and asked Bhai Sahib to enter into it which he did. To his utter astonishment, he neither feared the fire nor felt any heat. Instead he felt his elated soul soaring high above, while he watched his body burning below. Then someone explained to him that the dream-drama was enacted to take away his fear of death which he had considered as dreadful and end of all. He was then told to return to earth, to explain to people not to be afraid of death as it is only a change of state and not the end. He was also urged to convey the message that the only merit that counts in the other world is the “remembrance of His Name”, which Bhai Sahib has fully conveyed in his voluminous writings. Bhagat Kabir is not only happy in death but considers it as the gateway to the Beloved.Bhai Sahib’s dream supports the common belief that immediately after death the soul soars high and looks back at its burning body from a distance and feels light and relieved.

After death, except for the liberated souls, all others are taken to the court of True Justice (Dharam-raj) to answer their conduct on earth. The soul is fettered in chains and dragged along through a tortuous dark tunnel. In this court, the soul is told its good and evil deeds written in its account by the “secret agents of the Dharam-raj (Chitar & Gupt)”. Punishment is declared according to the nature of offences. In this trial no intervention or recommendation of any one matters. The punishment is solely based on one’s deeds. Persons who have not made the mark either turn into evil spirits or go into the cycle of death and birth, i.e. transmigration; the others who are partially qualified may be given another opportunity of human life. Dharamraj has no jurisdiction to handle or try the liberated souls.Those persons who have dyed their souls in the love of God, merge with the Supreme-Soul or are assigned tasks for redemption of humanity. There are no restrictions on them and are free to do whatever they like. My above-mentioned uncle died after a year of the incident. He had confided to his very close companion the date and time of his end. He even secretly prepared funeral clothes and wound up his worldly affairs beforehand. Since they were very close, he had also told him that should he feel separation, he could meet him anytime in the periphery of the Golden Temple at night-time as long as he did not disclose it to anyone else. His friend used to meet him there till he let the secret out.

A Muslim lady saint attracted to Sikhism, called Bibiji, lived in village Maili in Hoshiarpur District (Punjab). She was a devotee of Sant Baba Jawala Singh of Harkhowal mentioned earlier. One day she asked her followers to accompany her to a nearby hill top to spend the night there. In the morning they all came back. When repeatedly questioned about the purpose of the short visit, she reluctantly informed them that the Babaji had expired and his soul carried by angels was to pass over the hill and that she wanted to pay her respects to the great soul.

In the morning prayer of the Sikhs (Asa-di-//) staves No. 2, 3, and 14 paint the plight and delight of the human beings on their death. The translation by late Professor Puran Singh (1881-1931) is given below : The soul has to struggle to the Kingdom of Righteousness... The man who gives himself to physical pleasures, finally drops down dead, his body

is burnt to ashes. ............ But the soul, as it emerges out of the body is found fettered in heavy chains. ............ The inner man finds no protection anywhere, no one in his later affliction comes to his help. ............ And it is only then, beyond death, that man trembles with acute repentance… the soul weeps and cries. ............ As we do here, so shall we be judged. By our actions we shall be nearer Him or farther off. ............ Those informed of Truth find the way out and are lifted up. And those not informed never rise to grace. ............ Oh Lord Truth ! Those who have dyed their souls, With the colour of Thy Glory, Thy Love, Thy Name, have won the struggle of life and have passed above it, beyond it. ............ And the lovers of darkness are in struggle forever. The blind of heart thus lose the opportunity of physical life that comes for attaining freedom.

The above picture is corroborated in Japji stanza 34 as well.

All religions believe in the existence of the next world and the Court of True Justice where the soul has to render account of its deeds. Those who have meditated on God’s Name and have accumulated the treasure of good deeds will be approved, while the rejected ones will suffer and repent their indulgence in sensual pleasures. Judgement is purely based on ‘reap as you sow’ topped by ‘His Grace’.Death is not a horror but a blessing in disguise for those who lived this life in the pure spirit of beauty and love of Him. They love it, court it, and embrace it as demonstrated by the Sikh Gurus, the four sahibzadas, and numerous Sikh martyrs of the eighteenth century.

Remember death, forget not. Death, remembering that all must die, is a great chastener of the human mind. Rembering Him or Naam Simran is the harbinger of love, peace, and tranquility.

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