Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Big_Tera

Sikhs v Mughals

Recommended Posts

This is not about caste or anything like that.

Just wanted to know which Sikh groups/communties. ie such as Khatris/ Rajputs  did the majoriry of fighting against the mughals and during what periods? 

Did these different Sikh communities work together back then or were we divided even during the times of the Gurus? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Jacfsing2
8 minutes ago, Big_Tera said:

This is not about caste or anything like that.

Just wanted to know which Sikh groups/communties. ie such as Khatris/ Rajputs  did the majoriry of fighting against the mughals and during what periods? 

Did these different Sikh communities work together back then or were we divided even during the times of the Gurus? 

There were a variety of groups, the Punj Pyare were from different castes ranging from Khatri to Jatt. Banda Singh Babadur was a Rajput, (note Rajputs and Khatris despite being the same caste don't have similar descent), if you go to the era of Baba Buddha he was blessed with Shastar Vidya before the Mughal-Sikh war and he was a Jatt. The Sodhis who were related to the Guru who fought for Sikhi under Dhan Dhan Sri Guru Hargobind were Khatri. It was mostly Khatris and Jatts that fought during the Gurus time, but the Khatris were basically being lazy when they were Hindus, cause it was their original job to protect India, so after the Sikh religion was made, they started doing stuff again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Big_Tera said:

This is not about caste or anything like that.

Just wanted to know which Sikh groups/communties. ie such as Khatris/ Rajputs  did the majoriry of fighting against the mughals and during what periods? 

Did these different Sikh communities work together back then or were we divided even during the times of the Gurus? 

Wrong question. Victory that Sikhs gained over the Mughals and Afghans was due to Sikhi not caste. So it is irrelevant which caste did most of the fighting. The same Jatts, Rajputs, Tarkhans, Khatris quietly submitted to Turkic and Pathan invaders before embracing Sikhi. They were no match for those fierce fighters from central Asia. Only Guru ji made them capable to fight back and win

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jonny101 said:

Wrong question. Victory that Sikhs gained over the Mughals and Afghans was due to Sikhi not caste. So it is irrelevant which caste did most of the fighting. The same Jatts, Rajputs, Tarkhans, Khatris quietly submitted to Turkic and Pathan invaders before embracing Sikhi. They were no match for those fierce fighters from central Asia. Only Guru ji made them capable to fight back and win

You have given this fantastic and simple answer heaps of times  but still not understood by complicated people.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, JSinghnz said:

You have given this fantastic and simple answer heaps of times  but still not understood by complicated people.

Nah, they choose not to see what is under their nose to give themselves an ego boost. They're usually brainwashed to think this way too. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A British Officer, Captain Falcon, in his Handbook on Sikhs [1] wrote, in 1896, "The back-bone of the Sikh people is the great Jat Race, divided and sub-divided into numerous clans. The Jats are thoroughly independent in character, and assert personal and individual freedom, as against communal or tribal control, more strongly than any other people". As far the origin of the Jat Sikhs or in that matter other Jats, Major Barstow [2] remarked in 1928, "It is from these Scythian immigrants that most of the Jat tribes are at any rate partly descended. They thus colonized the Punjab, Northern Rajputana (modern Indian state of Rajasthan), and the western half of the Gangetic Doab (western part of the modern Indian state of Uttar Pardesh in northern India), and a considerable proportion of the inhabitants of these countries are undoubtly of Scythian origin". 

In regard to the characteristics of the Jat Sikhs Captain Bingley [3] quoted Thomason in 1899, "they are manly without false pride; undemonstrative; independent without insolence; reserved in manner, but good-natured, light-hearted, and industrious. No one could be associated with them for any time without conceiving both respect and liking for them". 

Approximately one third of Jats in South Asia follow Sikhism. They make up the majority of Sikhs. Even though there are no up to date accurate available statistics, some people say their number is as high as 85%. As per the A.D. 1888 census returns [4,5] figure for the total number of baptised Sikhs in India was 1,706,909 and the Jats accounted for 66%. Their association with Sikhism is deeply rooted. For example, two of the well known followers of Guru Nanak (born in 1469), the founder of Sikhism, were Jats: Bala (a Sandhu Jat [6]) and Bhai Buddha (a Randhawa Jat). 

Furthermore, Latif [7] said, "This vast delta (area surrounding the birthplace of Guru Nanak in Punjab called "Richna Doab"), during the period immediately preceding the establishment of the Sikh religion, was inhabited by the Jats and Bhattis (to the best of my knowledge Bhatti is also the clan name of some Jats). In addition, the world reknown Professor Ellsworth Huntington [8] of Yale University remarked, "…the Sikhs are the only one of these… …that has experienced any appreciable selection…. That as important religious selection took place among them in early days seem clear. People do not accept a new faith unless there is something in their temperament which responds to that faith…. Most of the original Sikhs were Jats…". Professor Huntington's assertion of the original Sikhs belonging to the Jat background is supported by several European eyewitness account writers of the eighteenth century: 

Colonel A.L.H. Polier (died in A.D. 1795) [9] wrote, "Originally and in general the Siques (Sikhs) are zemindars (landowners) or cultivators of land, and of that tribe called Jatts (Jats) which, in this part of India, are reckoned the best and most laborious tillers, though at the same time they are also noted for being of an unquiet and turbulent disposition. This tribe of Jatts (Jats) is very numerous and dispersed in all the country from the Sind (presently, a province of Pakistan or river Indus) to the southward far beyond Agra (a city in northern India). 

In another document Polier [9] said, "But what is more to be admitted is that those Seik (Sikh) Sirdars (Chiefs), whose territories border on the King's were but very lately of the Jauts (Jats) and of their race and tribe ---- they have put on their iron bracelet, fifty of them are enough to keep at bay a whole battalion of the king's forces, such as they are". 

Griffiths, J. (his document dated February 17, 1794 A.D.) [10] said, "The Jaats (Jats) are said to observe some institutions similar to the Seiks (Sikhs), wear their hair and beards in the same manner, and are part of the same people, who under Swrudge Mul (Suraj Mal----consult Chapter 5 for more information on this powerful king of the Jats), etc., formerly possessed many of the countries in the North India---". 
Francklin, W. (Documented during A.D. 1798-1803) [11] wrote, "Considerable similarity in their (Sikhs) general customs may be traced with those of the Jauts (Jats); though these, in some districts, apparently vary, the difference is not material, and their (Sikhs) permitting an interchange of marriages with the Jauts (Jats) of the Doab and Harrianah (probably same as the modern Haryana state of India) amounts almost to a conclusive proof of their affinity of origin. 
The Seiks (Sikhs) allow foreigners of every description to join their standard, to sit in their company, and to shave their beards, but excepting in the instances of the Jauts (Jats), they will not consent to intermarriages----. If indeed some regulations which are in their (Sikhs) nature purely military ----be excepted, it will be found, that the Seiks (Sikhs) are neither more or less than Jauts (Jats) in their primitive state". 
Browne, J. (Major and who written the first book in English on Sikhs "History of the Origin and Progress of the Sikhs" in A.D. 1788) [12] said, "The people known by the name of Sicks (Sikhs), were originally the common inhabitants of the provinces of Lahore and Multan (now both in Pakistan), and mostly of the Jaut (Jat) tribe ----". 
Francklin, W. (documented during A.D. 1798-1803) [11] wrote, "The Seiks (Sikhs), in their person, are tall, and of a manly erect deportment; their aspect is ferocious, their eyes piercing and animated; and in tracing their features a striking resemblance is observable to the Arabs who inhabit the banks of the Euphrates (river in modern Iraq)". This is an interesting observation on and appears to have some historical connection because General Sir Sykes [13] says in his book that a large number of Jats from the Indus Valley were taken to the marches of the Tigris (river in modern Iraq) in eighth century A.D. For more information on this topic the reader is directed to Chapter 3. 

Regarding the founding of Khalsa (baptised Sikhs or saint soldiers in A.D. 1699) by Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth and the last Guru of the Sikhs, 

Lt. General Sir MacMunn [14] wrote, "The Jats of the Punjab, sturdy and quarrelsome, flocked to the new brotherhood (Khalsa), and he (Guru Gobind Singh) soon had a force which enabled him to try conclusions… …with the forces at Delhi (Emperor of India's). A strong religious sense did animate these warlike, muscular Jats…. The Jat tribes about the Sutlej and the Ravi rivers hastened to join the faith…. No longer would they turn the cheek to their persecutor, and they began to group themselves by tribes and confederacies known as Misals…".
 
 
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Jacfsing2 said:

There were a variety of groups, the Punj Pyare were from different castes ranging from Khatri to Jatt. Banda Singh Babadur was a Rajput, (note Rajputs and Khatris despite being the same caste don't have similar descent), if you go to the era of Baba Buddha he was blessed with Shastar Vidya before the Mughal-Sikh war and he was a Jatt. The Sodhis who were related to the Guru who fought for Sikhi under Dhan Dhan Sri Guru Hargobind were Khatri. It was mostly Khatris and Jatts that fought during the Gurus time, but the Khatris were basically being lazy when they were Hindus, cause it was their original job to protect India, so after the Sikh religion was made, they started doing stuff again.

Remember what Sri Panth parkash says about those brar jatts who were paid salary & who abobdoned the guru... and majhail singhs never abandoning guruji. also a lot of majbe singhs fought for the khalsa and gave shaheedi, lot of the akali nihangs were" low castes". it was down to kalgidar giving us the spirit to give an answer back rather than to take a slap and not get up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Jacfsing2
1 hour ago, caveman said:

Remember what Sri Panth parkash says about those brar jatts who were paid salary & who abobdoned the guru... and majhail singhs never abandoning guruji. also a lot of majbe singhs fought for the khalsa and gave shaheedi, lot of the akali nihangs were" low castes". it was down to kalgidar giving us the spirit to give an answer back rather than to take a slap and not get up. 

What you said is true, but among a majority that was not the case. Vanjaria Sikhs also served the true Guru in the fights against injustice, but to claim that they made a majority is also not true. Bhai Mani Singh Shaheed and his family were Brahmins, but thst doesn't most Sikhs who were Shaheed were Brahmin ancestry. The majority of the fighters were Khatris and Jatts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sukhvirk76 said:

No such thing as a wrong question 

In this case, yes it is indeed a very wrong question. But someone who uses their caste name and always has an anti Gurmat stance on this forum wouldnt understand.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the eighteenth century Sikhs were very successful in establishing twelve principalities or confederacies called Misals (Misal is a Arabic word means alike or equal [4]). At least nine of these Misals were founded by the Jats. The history of each of the Misals founded in the eighteenth century by the Jats is briefly described below [6, 7, 15-17]. 

Bhangi Misal

This powerful Misal of the Sikhs was founded by Bhim Singh of the Jat background. The name "Bhangi" is derived from the members of the confederacy who made use of Bhang, an intoxicating drug manufactured from hemp [7, 16]. Bhim Singh was succeeded by his nephew named Hari Singh belonging to the Dhillon clan of the Jats. Hari Singh's sons, Jhanda Singh and Ganda Singh played an instrumental role in strengthening the Misl. Also, they are credited for constructing the Bhangi fort at Amritsar (the holy city of the Sikhs in Punjab) and enlarging and beautifying the town with many noble edifices [7] in the later part of the eighteenth century. 

Kanhya Misal

The first chief of this Misal was Jai Singh, a Jat of the Sandhu clan belonging to a village named Kanah, fifteen miles from Lahore (now in Pakistan) [7, 16]. The name of the Misal is derived from the name of Jai Singh's village and one time the Misal was the strongest of the Sikh confederacies north of the river Sutlej in Punjab [7]. 

Nakai Misal

The chief of this Misal was Hira Singh, a Jat of the Sandhu clan [7, 16]. The area lying between Lahore and Gogaira (now both in Pakistan) was called Naka country and during the middle of the eighteenth century A.D., Hira Singh took possession of it; thus the Misal became known as Nakai Misal. 

Singhpuria Misal

This is also known as the Fyzulpuria Misal after a village near Amritsar (Punjab) called Fyzullapur. The Misal was founded by a Jat landlord named Kapur Singh Virk who later on was popularly known as Nawab Kapur Singh Virk [7]. He died at Amritsar in A.D. 1753.

Krora Singhia Misal

Sometimes it is also known as the Panjgarhia Misal, from the village of its first chief, Karora Singh. Karora Singh belonged to the Jat background [7] and the Misal was popularly known after his name. 

Nishanwala Misal

Two Jats named Sangat Singh and Mohar Singh were the founder of this Misal [7]. These two warriors were the standard-bearers of the assembled Khalsa (baptized Sikh or pure) army, hence, the name Nishanwala was given to this Misal. 

Sukerchakia Misal

This Misal was founded by Charat Singh, a Jat of the Sandhawalia clan and grandfather of the Maharaja (great King) Ranjit Singh, the ruler of the Sikh empire of the nineteenth century [7]. The Misal is named after the native village of Charat Singh, called Sukerchak in Amritsar district of Punjab or Manjha country [15].

Phulkia Misal

As per Latif [7], the chief of this Misal was a Jat named Phul of the Sandhu (Sidhu?) clan; thus the Misal is known by his name. Phul had seven sons who became the ancestors of the royal families of Patiala, Nabha, and Jhind States (now in modern Punjab). 

Ramgarhia Misal

Latif [7] wrote, "The founder of the Misal was Khoshal Singh, a Jat of Mouza Guga near Amritsar, Punjab. After his death he was succeeded by Nodh Singh of Sahangi also near Amritsar. Three most daring brothers named Jassa Singh, Mali Singh, and Tara Singh of Tarkhan (carpenter) background and belonging to Mouza Sarsang in the Lahore district (now in Pakistan) became devout followers of Nodh Singh. After the death of Nodh Singh, Jassa Singh became the chief of the Misal. The Misal seized the fort of Ram Raouni (Fortalice of God) and then renamed it Ramgarh (God's Fort [17])". Later on the Misal was popularly known as the Ramgarhia Misal. The largest Bunga with two watchtowers, at the Complex of the Harmandar Sahib was built by the Ramgarhia Misl. The Bunga served as home base for the Ramgarhias during the yearly visits to the Temple and also as a military barracks from which the Ramgarhias could defend the Sacred Site. A gaint block of granite called the 'Coronation Stone' of the Grand Mughals is located in the second floor of the Bunga in the open balcony area. During the period when the Sikhs controlled Delhi the stone on which Emperors were installed and from which they read their edicts was removed from the Lal Killa and carted to Amritsar. This is said to be the very same stone from which the death sentences for Guru Tegh Bahadur and Banda Bahadur were pronounced.

Misaldars select a Punjab ka Maharaja

Maharaja Ranjit Singh, a Jat of the Sandhawalia clan and of the Sukerchakia Misal integrated all the Misals and ultimately established the Sikh empire in the North-West India, which ended with the British takeover in 1849. One time the Sikh empire embraced the whole of the undivided Punjab (prior to the creation of Pakistan), Kashmir, and a part of Tibet. Even though Maharaja Ranjit Singh was a Jat and a Sikh, during his rule he treated every individual and community very fairly which won him the admiration of people inside and outside his empire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

Nah, they choose not to see what is under their nose to give themselves an ego boost. They're usually brainwashed to think this way too. 

I suppose the European historians of as far back as the late 17th & early 18th century must have been wrong.... probably brainwashed 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Mahakaal96 said:

A British Officer, Captain Falcon, in his Handbook on Sikhs [1] wrote, in 1896, "The back-bone of the Sikh people is the great Jat Race, divided and sub-divided into numerous clans. The Jats are thoroughly independent in character, and assert personal and individual freedom, as against communal or tribal control, more strongly than any other people". As far the origin of the Jat Sikhs or in that matter other Jats, Major Barstow [2] remarked in 1928, "It is from these Scythian immigrants that most of the Jat tribes are at any rate partly descended. They thus colonized the Punjab, Northern Rajputana (modern Indian state of Rajasthan), and the western half of the Gangetic Doab (western part of the modern Indian state of Uttar Pardesh in northern India), and a considerable proportion of the inhabitants of these countries are undoubtly of Scythian origin". 

In regard to the characteristics of the Jat Sikhs Captain Bingley [3] quoted Thomason in 1899, "they are manly without false pride; undemonstrative; independent without insolence; reserved in manner, but good-natured, light-hearted, and industrious. No one could be associated with them for any time without conceiving both respect and liking for them". 

Approximately one third of Jats in South Asia follow Sikhism. They make up the majority of Sikhs. Even though there are no up to date accurate available statistics, some people say their number is as high as 85%. As per the A.D. 1888 census returns [4,5] figure for the total number of baptised Sikhs in India was 1,706,909 and the Jats accounted for 66%. Their association with Sikhism is deeply rooted. For example, two of the well known followers of Guru Nanak (born in 1469), the founder of Sikhism, were Jats: Bala (a Sandhu Jat [6]) and Bhai Buddha (a Randhawa Jat). 

Furthermore, Latif [7] said, "This vast delta (area surrounding the birthplace of Guru Nanak in Punjab called "Richna Doab"), during the period immediately preceding the establishment of the Sikh religion, was inhabited by the Jats and Bhattis (to the best of my knowledge Bhatti is also the clan name of some Jats). In addition, the world reknown Professor Ellsworth Huntington [8] of Yale University remarked, "…the Sikhs are the only one of these… …that has experienced any appreciable selection…. That as important religious selection took place among them in early days seem clear. People do not accept a new faith unless there is something in their temperament which responds to that faith…. Most of the original Sikhs were Jats…". Professor Huntington's assertion of the original Sikhs belonging to the Jat background is supported by several European eyewitness account writers of the eighteenth century: 

Colonel A.L.H. Polier (died in A.D. 1795) [9] wrote, "Originally and in general the Siques (Sikhs) are zemindars (landowners) or cultivators of land, and of that tribe called Jatts (Jats) which, in this part of India, are reckoned the best and most laborious tillers, though at the same time they are also noted for being of an unquiet and turbulent disposition. This tribe of Jatts (Jats) is very numerous and dispersed in all the country from the Sind (presently, a province of Pakistan or river Indus) to the southward far beyond Agra (a city in northern India). 

In another document Polier [9] said, "But what is more to be admitted is that those Seik (Sikh) Sirdars (Chiefs), whose territories border on the King's were but very lately of the Jauts (Jats) and of their race and tribe ---- they have put on their iron bracelet, fifty of them are enough to keep at bay a whole battalion of the king's forces, such as they are". 

Griffiths, J. (his document dated February 17, 1794 A.D.) [10] said, "The Jaats (Jats) are said to observe some institutions similar to the Seiks (Sikhs), wear their hair and beards in the same manner, and are part of the same people, who under Swrudge Mul (Suraj Mal----consult Chapter 5 for more information on this powerful king of the Jats), etc., formerly possessed many of the countries in the North India---". 
Francklin, W. (Documented during A.D. 1798-1803) [11] wrote, "Considerable similarity in their (Sikhs) general customs may be traced with those of the Jauts (Jats); though these, in some districts, apparently vary, the difference is not material, and their (Sikhs) permitting an interchange of marriages with the Jauts (Jats) of the Doab and Harrianah (probably same as the modern Haryana state of India) amounts almost to a conclusive proof of their affinity of origin. 
The Seiks (Sikhs) allow foreigners of every description to join their standard, to sit in their company, and to shave their beards, but excepting in the instances of the Jauts (Jats), they will not consent to intermarriages----. If indeed some regulations which are in their (Sikhs) nature purely military ----be excepted, it will be found, that the Seiks (Sikhs) are neither more or less than Jauts (Jats) in their primitive state". 
Browne, J. (Major and who written the first book in English on Sikhs "History of the Origin and Progress of the Sikhs" in A.D. 1788) [12] said, "The people known by the name of Sicks (Sikhs), were originally the common inhabitants of the provinces of Lahore and Multan (now both in Pakistan), and mostly of the Jaut (Jat) tribe ----". 
Francklin, W. (documented during A.D. 1798-1803) [11] wrote, "The Seiks (Sikhs), in their person, are tall, and of a manly erect deportment; their aspect is ferocious, their eyes piercing and animated; and in tracing their features a striking resemblance is observable to the Arabs who inhabit the banks of the Euphrates (river in modern Iraq)". This is an interesting observation on and appears to have some historical connection because General Sir Sykes [13] says in his book that a large number of Jats from the Indus Valley were taken to the marches of the Tigris (river in modern Iraq) in eighth century A.D. For more information on this topic the reader is directed to Chapter 3. 

Regarding the founding of Khalsa (baptised Sikhs or saint soldiers in A.D. 1699) by Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth and the last Guru of the Sikhs, 

Lt. General Sir MacMunn [14] wrote, "The Jats of the Punjab, sturdy and quarrelsome, flocked to the new brotherhood (Khalsa), and he (Guru Gobind Singh) soon had a force which enabled him to try conclusions… …with the forces at Delhi (Emperor of India's). A strong religious sense did animate these warlike, muscular Jats…. The Jat tribes about the Sutlej and the Ravi rivers hastened to join the faith…. No longer would they turn the cheek to their persecutor, and they began to group themselves by tribes and confederacies known as Misals…".
 
 

This is the typical orientalist bull5hit that was used to manipulate jut minds into becoming  docile, loyal foot soldiers for goray. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

This is the typical orientalist bull5hit that was used to manipulate jut minds into becoming  docile, loyal foot soldiers for goray. 

I take it most jatts in the 16th, 17th & 18th centuries could read English so would have been brainwashed by these accounts into becoming docile loyal foot soldiers as you say..... funny then that 2 of the most famous Indian freedom fighters against the British, Shaheed Bhagat Singh & Shaheed Udam Singh were both jatts

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Jonny101 said:

 

Dont know what Mahakaal is going on about because he and others like him fail to explain where was bravery of juts before they embraced Sikhi.

In sooraj prakash there is a saakhi of a Sikh asking Guru Gobing Singh jee of making the Pahari Rajputs as Sikhs. Guru ji replied to him that in future Sikhs will be gaining their own raaj. If these Rajputs are made Sikhs then they will get so hunkaari that they will attribute their victory to their Rajput warrior caste.

 

Guru ji said, that is why He is giving amrit to the lowly Juts, Tarkhans, Mazhabis, Nais because in future when they attain their Raaj they will give credit to the real reason for their victory which is Amrit of the Khalsa and not to their caste. 

 

Sadly today we can see some Sikhs have become so delusional that they attritube bravery and historic victory of Sikhs to their castes instead of the real reason for all victories of the Khalsa.

 

We have taken on Hindu characteristics of jaat abhimaan(pride in caste). 

Not at all brother, just adding some perspective to a topic that seems to attract negative & insulting comments from certain members.

 

6ve patshahs akal sena formed before Khalsa.... most recruits were from jatt background.

Adopting sikhi no doubt gives increase in self belief etc but it's hard to find similar observations from outsiders about tharkans, chumars etc who also adopted sikhi 

Some of the account by the historians attest to the fact that the Guru provided a structure & outlet for certain characteristics the jatts already had. The rest is mahraj lila I suppose 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  



  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Yes, knowledge of different schools og thought in india and even in islam is very helpful for Gurbani. Good taksaals/vidhaalye and steeks/tikakaar will teach you the background of every shabad. As the gurujis had many conversations myriads of people from all schools. And some of gurbani is those responses, background is very important.  Even knowing the stories of Rama etc.
    • Actually islam means submission. Not peace.
    • Don't be suprised if alot of videos that exposed these people and things go missing. The so called protecting kids and hate speech is a sham its actually denying free speech and free expression of thought. Cos alot of mild videos with alternative views and thoughts are taken down and channels closed for no reason. There are some nasty racist and pedofiles that deserved their channels closed but those warning people about stuff and videos even featuring crimes by governments and groups they got taken down too. Yet they were important in highlighting the crimes of these people so people could see the truth about what they got up to.
    • Here is my list of current problems we face as a kaum.  Traveling around giving aid / langar to non-sikhs. This thought was put into Sikh psyche as a strategy to destroy Sikhs from within by the enemy who wanted to move Sikhs away from position of strength to weakness. Guru ka langar never went around the world helping non-sikhs like this. Guru Ka langar was based on giving langar to the local sangat community. However was the non-sikh poor masses who came to the Sikhs and gurdwara's to get langar and get parchar to convert to Sikhi that made non-sikhs want to be a Sikh. This current innovation which has been created and run by idiots and is wasting sangats money giving langar away for free with no benefits for the kaum. The biggest gift a Sikh can give to a non-sikh is parchar because by that parchar the Sikh too will have to reform their character to live by what they preach. Not having well armed sewadaar guards of Gurdwara's. Safety and security of guru's house and his congregation should be paramount yet what do we see today? any afghan ahmed abdali, isis salafi muhammad musin, mughal aurangzeb can walk in and kill without any hindrance like we seen recently. What is the fall out? Sikhs will stop coming to gurdwara's and thus gurdwara commitee's lose income and gurdwara shuts down eventually. The non-muslim hating conquest loving isis type jihadi mullah nutjob wins as sikhi is seen as weak and finished eventually because gurdwara's are no longer safe spaces for people wanting to worship and congregate.  Sikhs of sarbat da bhulla mindset. Well meaning humanitarian liberal Sikhs but very gullible very politically and religiously naive not understand the full context of meaning of sarabat da bhalla and when to apply it. perhaps most of them have a sort of stockholm sydromme imprisoned by cultures and ideologies that are against Sikh interests and prevent their own community to survive. Fake Sikh puppet leaders. They are only in it for their own power, fame/popularity contest or financial gain (eg recent akal takht jathedhars, sgpc leaders, DT harnaam singh, Badal dal, congressi captain amrinder singh, etc). We need to support leaders who openly fight for the interests of Sikhs without being shy about it. Not having our own sovereign state nation. To conduct our own economic, military, religious and political affairs is the very reason we have so many problems. But its not necessary for the community to survive and thrive if other problems are dealt with. Inter-faith marriages and lack of promotion of inter-caste or inter-race Sikh marriages. Sikhs should activity promote inter-caste marriages within punjabis at the very least and help promote those non-sikhs to convert to Sikhi to marry someone within the faith.  
    • The tell-tale sign of an appointed gatekeeper of public discourse. Guiding the narrative and traffic of discussion away from "dangerous" areas that might prove to be troublesome for those at the very top. Someone like that gets to that position usually through attendance and membership of lodges... You can tell we're under lockdown. The mind goes to strange places when all the work of the day is done, lmao.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use