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2 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

Crusty old Singh uncles hogging the reins of power and the limelight (while getting nothing done), while the kind of person who actually gets noticed (rightly or wrongly) has to make their own way to bring attention to certain issues. Our leadership is pathetic. Absolute jokes.

it's criminal how the crusties are sidelining the youth who actually will have to deal with the outcome of their actions , The most shameful thing was the total abdication of responsibility for the welfare of farmers who got kidnapped and women that got kidnapped by police and tortured in stations and jails. I think the phrase 'ussi youth da teke nahin leha , ohna di rehaie da .'

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16 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

Crusty old Singh uncles hogging the reins of power and the limelight (while getting nothing done), while the kind of person who actually gets noticed (rightly or wrongly) has to make their own way to bring attention to certain issues. Our leadership is pathetic. Absolute jokes.

I always wondered at what age does the crusty old Singh period begin?

Is it in the 50's or 60's.

I reckon that there are middle aged people who complain about crusty Uncles when they are of the same age group.

 

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Just now, Ranjeet01 said:

I always wondered at what age does the crusty old Singh period begin?

Is it in the 50's or 60's.

I reckon that there are middle aged people who complain about crusty Uncles when they are of the same age group.

When I go conspicuously silent about crusty uncles, then you'll know when I'm in that demographic. I think I've got at least a good 10-15 years left before that happens. ??

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1 minute ago, Ranjeet01 said:

I always wondered at what age does the crusty old Singh period begin?

Is it in the 50's or 60's.

I reckon that there are middle aged people who complain about crusty Uncles when they are of the same age group.

 

yes I am in my fifties but I have thinking like this in my thirties but the grip of these corrupt people was stronger in my then times .

 

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8 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

When I go conspicuously silent about crusty uncles, then you'll know when I'm in that demographic. I think I've got at least a good 10-15 years left before that happens. ??

This is what I mean about adolescent mindset. Our middle aged folk mentally think they are young and complain about the "elders " who are hogging up the limelight. 

You are the "elder" now. You are not deferring authority to a 70 year old, but to a peer. 

Now you are bollocking someone of the same age, in fact you don't have authority to them because they are not your elder and you can support the youngsters. 

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