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Harjinder Singh Kukreja, The Sikh Globe-Trotter And Goodwill Ambassador


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https://www.outlookindia.com/website/story/outlook-spotlight-harjinder-singh-kukreja-the-sikh-globe-trotter-and-goodwill-ambassador/397666

Harjinder Singh Kukreja, The Sikh Globe-Trotter And Goodwill Ambassador

Little do people know, but he is also the first Sikh to skydive wearing his Turban in 2014 in Melbourne, Australia and the first Sikh to scuba-dive with his Turban in 2016 in Antalya, Turkey.

Harjinder Singh Kukreja, The Sikh Globe-Trotter And Goodwill Ambassador  
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Published: 14 Oct 2021, Updated: 14 Oct 2021 8:18 pm

With millions of followers on social media, Harjinder Singh Kukreja is one of the most followed Sikhs online. He is a renowned restaurateur, a global citizen with strong traditional roots, a variety of interests, with an amazing social media reach of over 4 million combined followers on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn.

Little do people know, but he is also the first Sikh to skydive wearing his Turban in 2014 in Melbourne, Australia and the first Sikh to scuba-dive with his Turban in 2016 in Antalya, Turkey.

When Harjinder Singh Kukreja steps foot in a new country or a new place or delves into a new subject, he carries with him his indomitable spirit of adventure, his knowledge of the heritage and legacy of India.

His vast experience and reach of active and significant influence in the world through social media, his sophisticated forays into meeting diplomats around the globe, and his unique detours as a keen family traveller are well known and acknowledged worldwide. All this with the responsibility and professionalism of a well-established business person, the love of a family person, the intervention of a public speaker and influencer, the gregariousness of a Punjabi with the courage and philanthropy of a Sikh.
 
Harjinder was awarded the ‘Jewels of Punjab’ Award in 2019 by India’s former Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh for his contribution to Sikh and Punjabi culture and its promotion in his typical ways.

From installing Sikh emblems, the Ik Onkar and Khanda at the World War I memorial in Ypres, Belgium in the memory of fallen Sikh soldiers to his contribution and presence at the unveiling of the bust of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in St.-Tropez, France, Harjinder has been highlighting the Sikh military history and making extensive efforts to promote it.

From gifting a unique painting of Maharaja Ranjit Singh with his French General Jean François Allard to the French Ambassador in India, Alexander Ziegler, to hoisting the Nishan Sahib in Gallipoli in Turkey to pay homage to the unknown Sikh soldiers who were martyred there, Harjinder loves to promote the lesser known aspects of Sikh history zealously.

Harjinder Singh Kukreja is also a top-notch travel influencer and an ambassador for outbound tourism from India. The Turkish Tourism Board admires Harjinder‘s clout on social media, and he has been invited several times to Turkey to promote their tourism. He and his family have been hosted several times by Inflow Summits in several regions of Turkey in association with Turkish Airlines. From the UK Tourist Authority to Iran’s unofficial Tourism Board -Feel Iran and several top-level Hotel brands like Hyatt, Ritz-Carlton, Kempinski and Four Seasons have collaborated with Harjinder Singh Kukreja and sought exposure on his social media pages.
 
Harjinder Singh Kukreja is also known for his entrepreneurial acumen. He spearheaded his family’s venture into giving Ludhiana’s chocolate aficionados the city’s first Belgian Chocolate Cafe, Belfrance Bakers and Chocolatiers, in 2015. The Ambassador of Belgium in India, H.E. Mr Jan Luykx, inaugurated Belfrance in upmarket Ludhiana.


Harjinder Singh Kukreja travelled extensively to Belgium and other European nations to seek inspiration and even trained to craft real Belgian chocolate in Brussels to make Belfrance what it is today. Belfrance is famous worldwide for its annual chocolate Ganesha, which has received great reception by Indian and international media for many years.
 
A staunch believer in the significance and importance of the family unit for societal progress, Harjinder Singh Kukreja is well-known for being a family man. His social media pages are full of endearing images and videos of his loveable children -Rehras Singh, Aad Sach Singh and Rut Suhavi Kaur.  His wife -Harkirat Kaur Kukreja, whom he proudly introduces as the ‘Sikh Supermom’, is the powerhouse of his life.
 
The teachings of Guru Nanak make Harjinder always a step ahead to put his best foot forward by contributing during unfortunate natural calamities. He has helped many flood-affected people in Jammu & Kashmir and even the victims of the Chennai floods. “I believe in such times we all, as humanity, must give our services in the form of money, clothes, items of daily needs and food”, says Harjinder Singh Kukreja.

In his efforts to bring equality and humanity together, Harjinder organised a unique Sikh Langar inside Ludhiana’s historical Mosque -Jama Masjid, where he welcomed people of all religions. This initiative was acclaimed widely and received accolades from across the boundaries of countries and communities. From educating unprivileged children to contributing to their marriages, Harjinder Singh Kukreja and his family are always ready to pitch in. 

Harjinder Singh Kukreja has a soft-corner for the Syrian refugees because his grandfather, Randhir Singh Kukreja migrated to India, post the partition as a refugee from Sialkot, which is now in Pakistan. In 2017, Harjinder Singh Kukreja wore the jersey of Ravi Singh’s Khalsa Aid International and flew from Istanbul to Gaziantep in Turkey, merely 80 km from the war-torn Syrian capital, to spend an entire day with Syrian refugees.
 
Government schools and offices in France do not allow religious symbols like Turbans and Hijabs. Harjinder Singh Kukreja decided to voice his concern positively. In 2014, he skydived with the Turban from 14,000ft in St Kilda, Melbourne, Australia, and he is also the first Sikh to scuba-dive in the Turban in 2016 in Antalya, Turkey.

“My Turbaned skydive was an effort made to raise voice in favour of not just the Sikh religion but for everyone who wears articles of faith like the cross, hijab, kippah, skull cap and the Turban”, says Harjinder Singh Kukreja.

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https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/entertainment/events/chandigarh/ludhiana-family-meet-dalai-lama-receive-his-blessings-as-khata/articleshow/87137285.cms

 

Ludhiana family meet Dalai Lama, receive his blessings as Khata

 
By - 
TNN
Created: Oct 19, 2021, 18:40 IST
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Flowing from Dalai Lama's love of Sikhism, expressed many times during his interactions and interventions about the uniqueness of the Sikh religion, the fourteenth Dalai Lama bestowed the white Tibetan Spiritual Scarf on Harkirat Kaur Kukreja and her family in a special audience granted to them at his residence in Tsuglagkhang, Dharamshala. Signifying an open heart, the Khata -the white Tibetan Spiritual Scarf -the equivalent of the Sikh Sirpoa was blessed to Harkirat, her husband, Harjinder Singh Kukreja and their three children, Rehras Singh Kukreja, Aad Sach Singh Kukreja and Rut Suhavi Kaur Kukreja.
 

Said Harkirat, a Ludhiana-based entrepreneur, traveller and parenting influencer, "One of my life-long dreams has been accomplished. I will cherish these moments for the rest of my life." She added, "The whole atmosphere was reverberating with love with compassion. The aura was amazing. My children were overwhelmed with the presence of the Dalai Lama and enjoyed every moment there."
 

During his last visit to Darbar Sahib -Golden Temple in Amritsar, the Dalai Lama had said, "I wholeheartedly admire Sikhism…the world needs this kind of strength."
 

Harkirat said, "I think the message of Tibetan Buddhism and Sikhism are the same. All human beings are equal and have to be treated with love and compassion at all times."
 

Equally awed, her husband, Harjinder said, "His Holiness greeted us, looked into our eyes, touched our turbans and expressed happiness while blessing us. His radiance, his humour and his immensely simplified solutions to life's problems are truly inspiring." Historically, the Sikh association with Tibet is more than two centuries old when Sikh soldiers went on an expansionist expedition to Tibet and China in the Tibetan region resulting in the Sino-Sikh-Tibetan Treaty with Maharaja Ranjit Singh in 1842. In this region, Guru Nanak is referred to as the Nanak Lama.
 

Harkirat, who is also known as the Sikh Supermom, said, "The Dalai Lama stands out as a tall pillar of peace for humankind today."
 

Touched with the spiritual charisma of the Dalai Lama, she added, "His parting words -Stay Happy, Stay spiritual and Stay Sikh, will stay with us forever."
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Maybe I'm being harsh, but I'd be more impressed with a Sikh in this day and age who confronts the issues that the rest of society has been conditioned to be scared into even thinking about. For me, a Sikh that fearlessly highlights the hypocricies and double-standards of a world where some groups are elevated at the expense of others because the ruling apparatus of the day is playing its usual divide and conquer game, would be more representative of the Guru's Sikh than someone seeking popularity and to be loved by everyone. I've always considered that to be a veneer for not wanting to make oneself a target and prevent making tough decisions, rather than some overwhelming moral imperative to do good. 

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1 minute ago, MisterrSingh said:

Maybe I'm being harsh, but I'd be more impressed with a Sikh in this day and age who confronts the issues that the rest of society has been conditioned to be scared into even thinking about. For me, a Sikh that fearlessly highlights the hypocricies and double-standards of a world where some groups are elevated at the expense of others because the ruling apparatus of the day is playing its usual divide and conquer game, would be more representative of the Guru's Sikh than someone seeking popularity and to be loved by everyone. I've always considered that to be a veneer for not wanting to make oneself a target and prevent making tough decisions, rather than some overwhelming moral imperative to do good. 

Sorry to be brutally honest to our Khatri brethren, but I'm not surprised that this is a 'bhappa' family. 

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1 minute ago, Premi5 said:

Sorry to be brutally honest to our Khatri brethren, but I'm not surprised that this is a 'bhappa' family. 

I wasn't coming at it from a caste perspective. That's all you. 😂

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15 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

What's your definition of patronising? YOURS. Don't look it up on Google before you reply.

Don't know what you mean by looking up on google, I don't think I need to. 

Not sure if you realise it, but I've come across several of your posts which talk down on other posters/posts. Sometimes it's done in an attempt at being humorous but the tone still gives it away. 

I've seen it with @jkvlondon's  and @GurjantGnostic's posts for sure. You do know a lot, and come across very intelligently and I enjoy learning from you and reading your interesting opinions and insights, but some of your posts make out that you know best and others' opinions are inferior. Like you are 'mansplaining' 

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1 hour ago, Premi5 said:

Don't know what you mean by looking up on google, I don't think I need to. 

Not sure if you realise it, but I've come across several of your posts which talk down on other posters/posts. Sometimes it's done in an attempt at being humorous but the tone still gives it away. 

I've seen it with @jkvlondon's  and @GurjantGnostic's posts for sure. You do know a lot, and come across very intelligently and I enjoy learning from you and reading your interesting opinions and insights, but some of your posts make out that you know best and others' opinions are inferior. Like you are 'mansplaining' 

I've emerged from the end of a period of my life where I was struggling with self-doubt and a need to be accomodating EVEN WHEN I felt I was correct in my assertions. I previously forced myself to suppress what I believed to be true even though this gesture was never reciprocated by others. In order to continue my growth as a person I've decided to be considerably more forthright with my opinions, because I've realised there's no need for me to be accomodating to the point where I don't do myself and my ideas justice.

My desire to hammer home my points doesn't come from a sense of superiority, but for a feeling that I have no need to retreat into faux-humility to be heard. If you disagree with me or don't like what I'm saying because of my manner, that's no longer my problem. I will meet someone halfway if I feel there's some ground to concede. If I'm expected to do so because it's the so-called polite thing to do - at the expense of what I believe - then it's not happening, and I WILL NOT apologise for being this way.

That "inferiority complex" comes from within you. I suggest you work on it.

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5 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

I've emerged from the end of a period of my life where I was struggling with self-doubt and a need to be accomodating EVEN WHEN I felt I was correct in my assertions. I previously forced myself to suppress what I believed to be true even though this gesture was never reciprocated by others. In order to continue my growth as a person I've decided to be considerably more forthright with my opinions, because I've realised there's no need for me to be accomodating to the point where I don't do myself and my ideas justice.

My desire to hammer home my points doesn't come from a sense of superiority, but for a feeling that I have no need to retreat into faux-humility to be heard. If you disagree with me or don't like what I'm saying because of my manner, that's no longer my problem. I will meet someone halfway if I feel there's some ground to concede. If I'm expected to do so because it's the so-called polite thing to do - at the expense of what I believe - then it's not happening, and I WILL NOT apologise for being this way.

That "inferiority complex" comes from within you. I suggest you work on it.

Okay, I'm glad you explained this. You're trying to recalibrate. By going the other way. Makes sense. 

You went from a completely timid type, to putting your opinion out shamelessly (regardless of perceived merit). It is strange to witness, but the above explains it. 

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On 10/21/2021 at 2:04 AM, Premi5 said:

Little do people know, but he is also the first Sikh to skydive wearing his Turban in 2014 in Melbourne, Australia and the first Sikh to scuba-dive with his Turban in 2016 in Antalya, Turkey.

Lol.. self-promotion.. I know a lot of folks with paags and dumallay who did that way before the above listed years.. 😂

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20 hours ago, Premi5 said:

Sorry to be brutally honest to our Khatri brethren, but I'm not surprised that this is a 'bhappa' family. 

Bhappaas take good care of Gurdwara Sahibs in their cities. They also help the khalsa panth financially.

Bad thing about bhaappas is that they hijack panthic organizations.

They had completely ruined Akj. Present akj Jathedaars are repairing the damage thankfully.

Bhappaas shud admit that they lack fighting spirit and warrior mindset and shud stop taking control of panthic organizations. If they do that, they are beneficial to the Khalsa panth.

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1 minute ago, shastarSingh said:

Bhappaas take good care of Gurdwara Sahibs in their cities. They also help the khalsa panth financially.

Bad thing about bhaappas is that they hijack panthic organizations.

They had completely ruined Akj. Present akj Jathedaars are repairing the damage thankfully.

Bhappaas shud admit that they lack fighting spirit and warrior mindset and shud stop taking control of panthic organizations. If they do that, they are beneficial to the Khalsa panth.

Brother, please post more on this site, you give a good perspective from India and you are very knowledgeable. 

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