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toddlers kachera


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3 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

It's one way to get very young children to resent their religion and their traditions from the get-go. What form of cognition does a child of a few months possess that he or she could possibly be judged to be adhering to the particulars of their faith in that way? At that age it's akin to dressing up little dolls and showing them off to family and friends. I understand the need to start them off early, particularly in these irreligious times, but start with naam before anything else.

Well the other two of the OP's children were 3 and 2. But anyway, you have to clothe the children in some way or another. What could be wrong with clothing them in Sikh clothes? 

How could children resent their religion if, as you say, they don't have cognition in the first place?

People of every background do stuff to their children. Jews/Muslims snip parts of their children's penises off. Hindus shave their kids' hair off. Christians cut their children's hair.

What could possibly be wrong with wearing a kachera?

If they are not to wear a kachera, are you saying that they should "go commando"?

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3 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

It's one way to get very young children to resent their religion and their traditions from the get-go. What form of cognition does a child of a few months possess that he or she could possibly be judged to be adhering to the particulars of their faith in that way? At that age it's akin to dressing up little dolls and showing them off to family and friends. I understand the need to start them off early, particularly in these irreligious times, but start with naam before anything else.

Having spoken to a Nihang chief, the relaxation given to bhujangis (Sikh children) in the matter of Sikh rehit is that they may wear pajamis before the age of 5. There is no relaxation in regards to going kachera-less.

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While it's one thing for a child of less than 1/2 year to merely wear a shirt/kurta, I would not want to see a 3 year old's <banned word filter activated> dangling around in the Gurdwara Sahib. So I think that such a child's nakedness should be covered with a kachera.

The OP should be able to get some sewn up the next time she visits Amritsar. There's a Sikh tailor near the Langar entrance of Darbar Sahib.

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practicality : instead of naali should put elastic (wide flat)in nefaa  so they can have independence of dealing with bathroom visits . until they are ready to deal with naala.

For those peeps who question bhen ji wanting to do this , frankly there is hardly kaparda in knickers for girls and boys , my daughter wears girl boxers as she feel uncovered in regular shape briefs and would quite happily switch to a kacchera . There is zero difference between boys boxers and kaccherey so they've never been fussed about wearing kaccherey. To be sure they'll never be speedo wearers out of personal choice.

OP I'd make your own , it is fairly simple stitching all straight lines and you can scale down the size to suit bhujangis .

 

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1 hour ago, BhForce said:

While it's one thing for a child of less than 1/2 year to merely wear a shirt/kurta, I would not want to see a 3 year old's <banned word filter activated> dangling around in the Gurdwara Sahib. So I think that such a child's nakedness should be covered with a kachera.

The OP should be able to get some sewn up the next time she visits Amritsar. There's a Sikh tailor near the Langar entrance of Darbar Sahib.

I genuinely thought the kids were 2, 3, and 5 months, lmao. I went back and reread the original post, and it makes sense now, because unless she was growing the poor kids in plant pots, there's no way they could be that young!

That's fine; my mum dressed me in bana when I was 5. I had a tiny dastaar, mini kirpaan, chola, etc., on special religious occasions. Still, I would sound a warning that very young children shouldn't be wielded as religious accessories designed to virtue signal one's religious adherence. They aren't an extension of their parents' religiosity. Knowing our mindset as a community, we are prone to prioritising the external over the internal, and in that respect I'd argue since the child isn't fully aware of why they're being dressed up in that way, there's no spiritual benefit in doing so, because it's not a conscious choice on their part. However, if we're talking about "training" children to become accustomed to our ways and traditions, then starting them out early is a good thing. 

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5 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

I genuinely thought the kids were 2, 3, and 5 months, lmao. I went back and reread the original post, and it makes sense now, because unless she was growing the poor kids in plant pots, there's no way they could be that young!

Lol! To be honest, that's exactly what I thought at first glance, too! Then I thought, "OK, how can she have birthed kids spaced at 2 and 1 months??" 

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WJKK WJKF Sangat Ji thank you to all those that replied with positive replies. People like you are the reason this Panth has a minute trace of unity left. You should be proud of yourself.

Just to lessen the hatred and negativity inside of those that took offence by my question:

»» I want to dress my kids in the full Bana so as they see it a part of them. If we put on english clothes without thinking twice why is Bana seen as a costume that you have to dress up in? My eldest adores Shaheed Singhs pictures with Banae on - what more can a mother ask for if her children say they want to look just like those Gursikhs? I feel immensly blessed my children consider their Bana a part of their identity.

I agree Bani is very important but in todays day and age i find children are encouraged far more into Sikhi through the outer shell of Sikhi before the inner i.e. Bana, Gatka, Sashtar, Langar, fun camps etc once they fall in love with this Waheguru bless us all they will almost for sure fall in love with the deeper inner Sikhi e.g. Gurbani, Simran, Seva etc etc. 

»» I guess it's easy to laugh - I noted my children's age very much correctly - I try not to share too much information online but just a polite suggestion that it's only nice to consider people's feelings before typing. 

 

Thank you for those that shared video links. Very helpful. WJKK WJKF

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Further proof initiation into the Khalsa has been hijacked & turned into a joke..... when will you people realise the Khalsa is a fauj with rules & procedures!!!!

Could someone just start wearing a police uniform or a British army uniform because they felt like it or started dressing their kids like that because the kids liked it??! No they couldn’t!

To think there was a time when Nihang Singhs used to do 12 years of seva before being given full bana.....

What a joke the panth has become when any tom <banned word filter activated> or Harry can adopt Khalsa roop at a whim

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WJKK WJKF Mahakaal96

I agree with you - you are correct in what you say we can never live up to the standards of such Baane wale Gursikhs - their roop cannot be matched. Your prespective is correct.

Though if you could please look at it from my prespective too?

When my children wear their Baane their whole person is transformed into that of a Gursikh. The way they present themselves, walk, talk, behave etc etc is all of a positive Gursikh nature. I guess it's the blessings of the Gurmukh Saroop. It's those qualities a mother tries to dig out and nurture so their child's mindset and physical being adapts and lives by those qualities as a norm. I rather my children imitate and dress as a chardikala Gursikh in hope they idolise them rather than imitating or wanting to be like 'x' cartoon/tv character or celebrity etc. Waheguru.

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