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Paedophile doctor, 28, who groomed '13-year-old girl' on Kik using the username 'olderc**k' walks free from court after his lawyer blamed his actions on working long hours during the pandemic

  • James Peter Farthing, 28, spoke to the 'teenager' on messaging service Kik
  • He asked to see pictures of her and sent the account a picture of his <banned word filter activated>
  • But the NHS doctor was actually speaking to an undercover police officer
  • He admitted attempting to groom a child and was given a suspended sentence 

James Peter Farthing, 28, spoke to the 'teenager' on messaging service Kik - under the username ¿olderc**k¿ - as well as on Snapchat

A doctor who attempted to groom a '13-year-old girl' online has been spared prison after his lawyers blamed his actions on working long hours during the Covid pandemic.

James Peter Farthing, 28, spoke to the 'teenager' on messaging service Kik - under the username 'olderc**k' - as well as on Snapchat.

The junior doctor, who worked for the NHS in Stockport, asked to see photographs of her body and shared an image of <banned word filter activated>.

The account was actually being run by an undercover police officer and Farthing was later arrested for attempting to engage in sexual communication with a child.

However, today he walked free from Minshull Street Crown Court after being handed a suspended sentence.

Lawyers mitigating for Farthing, said he had been juggling working long hours during the pandemic, his wife's health condition and his training. 

They said he had 'emotional struggles', had been watching pornography and smoking cannabis at the time - but that he was working to address his issues.

Her Honour Judge Tina Landale sentenced him to six months in prison, suspended for two years, after he admitted attempting to engage in sexual communication with a child.

He was handed concurrent sentences for attempting to involve a child aged 13 or over in non-penetrative sexual activity; and attempting to engage with a child aged 13 to 15 to watch and look at images of a sexual nature.

The court heard Farthing spoke to the 'girl' on Kik - under the username 'olderc**k', Fiona Clancy, prosecuting said. He also spoke to her on Snapchat, in March.

He said he was 23 and from Leeds. The 'girl' was called 'Beth' and was said to have been from Liverpool.

The cop used a picture of kittens to portray how young she was, Ms Clancy said.

Farthing asked 'Beth' if she was into 'older guys' and if she would send him a picture.

'Beth' told him: 'I'm 13, by the way.' Farthing replied: 'Cool. Are you down for role play or sex?'

He asked to see her body and offered to show her his <banned word filter activated>. The 'girl' said she was worried about sending a photograph.

Farthing reassured her that if she didn't include her face, it 'should be fine'.

'The fact that the undercover officer was 13 was reiterated, but the sexual conversations continued,' Ms Clancy said, as the conversations moved to Snapchat.

Farthing told 'Beth': 'I have spoken to a few girls that like older men.'

The officer then sent a picture of a young, clothed girl.  Farthing sent a photograph of his <banned word filter activated>.

'I really want to touch your body and see what you look like naked,' he said.

He then sent another picture of his <banned word filter activated>.

Ms Clancy said that when officers arrested Farthing, he said he was 'ashamed' and 'tried to stop', but 'gave in to sexual pleasure', the court heard.

Simon Gurney, defending, said Farthing, who has no previous convictions, was 'deeply ashamed and remorseful for his behaviour'.

Simon Gurney, defending, said Farthing (pictured), who has no previous convictions, was 'deeply ashamed and remorseful for his behaviour'

 

His supervisor - a consultant - and training programme director provided statements to the court.

Staff and patients 'all expressed shock' after Farthing was arrested, the court heard, as people thought he had a good 'moral compass'. 

Mr Gurney said they 'stand by him' because they acknowledge his remorse.

The lawyer said it was the first time in Farthing's career that he didn't enjoy his work - and that his family was in debt as a result of the pandemic. 

Mr Gurney said Farthing 'only has himself to blame for jeopardising' his career. 

Judge Landale said the 'girl' made it 'clear that she didn't want to talk about sex'. 

Farthing was ordered to take part in the Horizon project; to complete 20 rehabilitation activity requirement days; and to undertake 200 hours of unpaid work.

He was also made the subject of a sexual harm prevention order - to last a decade.

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9995087/NHS-junior-doctor-28-groomed-13-year-old-girl-Kik-spared-prison.html

 

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Although news like this is hardly anything fresh or new, it's heart wrenching to see how some people view others' lives as disposable.

David Gomoh murder: Gang members jailed for NHS worker stabbing

 

Quote

He had no links to any gangs but was randomly targeted as part of a feud. His death was part of a "petty but fatal game of one-upmanship" played out on the streets, the Old Bailey heard.

 

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I don't know if it's Kalyug or the start of Satyug. A lot of very evil things that have been going on unchallenged for  a long time have now finally started to be recognised and challenged. 

 

UK faces reckoning after unmarked Indigenous graves discovered in Canada

This article is more than 2 months old

Activists call on Britain to acknowledge its role in efforts to erase Indigenous culture

 

The United Kingdom is facing growing calls to re-examine the troubling legacy of its colonial history in Canada after the discovery of more than 1,000 unmarked graves at former residential schools for Indigenous children.

At least 150,000 Indigenous children were forced to attend such church-run schools as part of the campaign to strip them of their cultural identity, and amid anger over the Catholic church’s role in operating the majority of the institutions, churches across the country have been set on fire.

 

But activists have also pointed the finger at Canada’s colonial ruler, demanding greater recognition of the British empire’s role in establishing policies that aimed to erase Indigenous culture, and a system whose effects are still felt today.

Last week, protesters toppled statues of Queen Victoria and Elizabeth II, and another – of the explorer James Cook – was hurled into the sea.

“The wresting of lands away from Indigenous peoples was permissible because it was done in the name of the British Empire,” said Sean Carleton, a professor of Canadian and Indigenous history at the University of Manitoba. “And so statues and street names in the country have become targeted because they are symbols of that legitimacy.”

 

Countries that enslaved people and dispossessed Indigenous nations have in recent years been forced to reassess legacy figures once held up as national heroes.

In the United States, more than 100 statues have been removed, of Confederate generals and explorers such as Christopher Columbus. In the United Kingdom, statues of the slave traders Edward Colston and Robert Milligan have been torn down.

“The history of empire-making was connected around the globe in different ways,” said Carleton, pointing to similarly brutal strategies of violence and discussions used by colonial powers. “But the unmaking of empire is also a similarly connected global phenomenon.”

In Belgium, a statue of King Leopold II was recently defaced and then removed. Australia, Barbados, Chile and Colombia have seen similar pushes to tear down colonial figures.

That movement has now reached Canada.

“This is part of a broader push by Indigenous peoples, who experienced similar types of erasure by the crown and colonial powers, for liberation,” said Courtney Skye, research fellow at the First Nations-led Yellowhead Institute. “Why did residential schools happen in Canada? Why are children being found in unmarked graves? This is all part of telling the story of how Canada came to exist.”

Days after 215 unmarked graves were found at the side of one former residential school, a crowd pulled down a statue of Egerton Ryerson, which stood before the university bearing his name. Ryerson is seen as one of the architects of the school programme, and the statue’s head now sits atop a metal pole on the territory of the Six Nations of the Grand River.

“Statues are a symbol of how colonial countries like Canada engage in mythmaking and a retelling of their history. Only a certain part is taught and the rest is erased,” said Skye, a member of the Mohawk Nation’s Turtle Clan. “Elevating figures that were responsible for implementing policies that contributed to the genocide against Indigenous peoples in Canada – suggesting in 2021 that they deserve recognition – is frustrating.”

or some, the now toppled statue of Victoria that stood for more than a century outside the Manitoba legislature represented Canada’s status as a constitutional monarchy.

But for others, it was a grim reminder that Victoria was the reigning monarch when the Stone Fort treaty was signed between the British crown and the Anishinabe and Swampy Cree nations – an agreement that many within those nations feel was never honoured.

Victoria was also in power when the country’s residential school system was formally established. A crowd chanted “no pride in genocide” before pulling down the statues of the monarchs – an act quickly condemned by Boris Johnson’s office.

“What we allow in the public memory and what we allow to be erased is a very political project,” said Veldon Coburn, a professor in Indigenous studies at the University of Ottawa. “The goal and history of colonialism is to just not wipe out the people, but wipe out whatever we might remember of them.”

The same day the two statues were pulled down in Winnipeg, protesters in Victoria, British Columbia, took aim at James Cook, breaking up the statue of the British explorer and throwing it into the city’s harbour. Hours later, an Indigenous totem pole was found burning outside the city, with the warning “one totem – one statue” spray-painted nearby.

 
 
 
01:16
Queen Victoria statue toppled in Canada over deaths of indigenous children – video

But muted Canada Day celebrations this year and the tributes to the victims of the residential school system suggest a shift in the national mood, said Coburn.

“People were showing how superficial the image of Canada is when it’s laid overtop the suffering of Indigenous nations,” he said. “They showed there are cracks in the facade.”

 This article was amended on 9 July 2021. Text was changed to remove a potentially misleading implication that all Canada’s residential schools for Indigenous children were run by the Catholic church.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/06/canada-british-empire-indigenous-children-unmarked-graves

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2 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

I don't know if it's Kalyug or the start of Satyug. A lot of very evil things that have been going on unchallenged for  a long time have now finally started to be recognised and challenged. 

 

UK faces reckoning after unmarked Indigenous graves discovered in Canada

This article is more than 2 months old

Activists call on Britain to acknowledge its role in efforts to erase Indigenous culture

 

The United Kingdom is facing growing calls to re-examine the troubling legacy of its colonial history in Canada after the discovery of more than 1,000 unmarked graves at former residential schools for Indigenous children.

At least 150,000 Indigenous children were forced to attend such church-run schools as part of the campaign to strip them of their cultural identity, and amid anger over the Catholic church’s role in operating the majority of the institutions, churches across the country have been set on fire.

 

But activists have also pointed the finger at Canada’s colonial ruler, demanding greater recognition of the British empire’s role in establishing policies that aimed to erase Indigenous culture, and a system whose effects are still felt today.

Last week, protesters toppled statues of Queen Victoria and Elizabeth II, and another – of the explorer James Cook – was hurled into the sea.

“The wresting of lands away from Indigenous peoples was permissible because it was done in the name of the British Empire,” said Sean Carleton, a professor of Canadian and Indigenous history at the University of Manitoba. “And so statues and street names in the country have become targeted because they are symbols of that legitimacy.”

 

Countries that enslaved people and dispossessed Indigenous nations have in recent years been forced to reassess legacy figures once held up as national heroes.

In the United States, more than 100 statues have been removed, of Confederate generals and explorers such as Christopher Columbus. In the United Kingdom, statues of the slave traders Edward Colston and Robert Milligan have been torn down.

“The history of empire-making was connected around the globe in different ways,” said Carleton, pointing to similarly brutal strategies of violence and discussions used by colonial powers. “But the unmaking of empire is also a similarly connected global phenomenon.”

In Belgium, a statue of King Leopold II was recently defaced and then removed. Australia, Barbados, Chile and Colombia have seen similar pushes to tear down colonial figures.

That movement has now reached Canada.

“This is part of a broader push by Indigenous peoples, who experienced similar types of erasure by the crown and colonial powers, for liberation,” said Courtney Skye, research fellow at the First Nations-led Yellowhead Institute. “Why did residential schools happen in Canada? Why are children being found in unmarked graves? This is all part of telling the story of how Canada came to exist.”

Days after 215 unmarked graves were found at the side of one former residential school, a crowd pulled down a statue of Egerton Ryerson, which stood before the university bearing his name. Ryerson is seen as one of the architects of the school programme, and the statue’s head now sits atop a metal pole on the territory of the Six Nations of the Grand River.

“Statues are a symbol of how colonial countries like Canada engage in mythmaking and a retelling of their history. Only a certain part is taught and the rest is erased,” said Skye, a member of the Mohawk Nation’s Turtle Clan. “Elevating figures that were responsible for implementing policies that contributed to the genocide against Indigenous peoples in Canada – suggesting in 2021 that they deserve recognition – is frustrating.”

or some, the now toppled statue of Victoria that stood for more than a century outside the Manitoba legislature represented Canada’s status as a constitutional monarchy.

But for others, it was a grim reminder that Victoria was the reigning monarch when the Stone Fort treaty was signed between the British crown and the Anishinabe and Swampy Cree nations – an agreement that many within those nations feel was never honoured.

Victoria was also in power when the country’s residential school system was formally established. A crowd chanted “no pride in genocide” before pulling down the statues of the monarchs – an act quickly condemned by Boris Johnson’s office.

“What we allow in the public memory and what we allow to be erased is a very political project,” said Veldon Coburn, a professor in Indigenous studies at the University of Ottawa. “The goal and history of colonialism is to just not wipe out the people, but wipe out whatever we might remember of them.”

The same day the two statues were pulled down in Winnipeg, protesters in Victoria, British Columbia, took aim at James Cook, breaking up the statue of the British explorer and throwing it into the city’s harbour. Hours later, an Indigenous totem pole was found burning outside the city, with the warning “one totem – one statue” spray-painted nearby.

 
 
 
01:16
Queen Victoria statue toppled in Canada over deaths of indigenous children – video

But muted Canada Day celebrations this year and the tributes to the victims of the residential school system suggest a shift in the national mood, said Coburn.

“People were showing how superficial the image of Canada is when it’s laid overtop the suffering of Indigenous nations,” he said. “They showed there are cracks in the facade.”

 This article was amended on 9 July 2021. Text was changed to remove a potentially misleading implication that all Canada’s residential schools for Indigenous children were run by the Catholic church.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/06/canada-british-empire-indigenous-children-unmarked-graves

I was just talking about that end or beginning? What kind of phase are we in? With a friend today. 

Is Kalyug turning into Kaliyug? Is it Satyug dawning? Or is Kalyug becoming dark enough truths are coming out but for the sole purpose of the lowliness being known and normalized?

 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-58664788

Former Labour MP Keith Vaz faces Parliament ban over bullying staff member

By Brian Wheeler
Political reporter

Published
16 minutes ago
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Keith VazIMAGE SOURCE,PA MEDIA

Ex-Labour MP Keith Vaz should be ashamed of his behaviour towards a

 

Ex-Labour MP Keith Vaz should be ashamed of his behaviour towards a House of Commons staff member, a report on his conduct has said.

Mr Vaz's "sustained and unpleasant bullying" of Jenny McCullough had an "enduring psychological impact" on her, a panel of independent experts says.

The panel says Mr Vaz - who stood down as an MP in 2019 - should be never be given a Parliamentary pass again.

He has rejected the ruling and says he is considering legal action.

Ms McCullough says she was subjected to verbal abuse and attempts to undermine her position, when she worked as a clerk for the Home Affairs Committee, chaired at the time by Mr Vaz.

The former minister likened her to prostitutes, told her she could not do her job effectively because she was "not a mother", and threatened to take photographs of her drinking alcohol to show to her boss, according to the report.

'Psychological threat'

Parliament's standards commissioner has already rebuked Mr Vaz, with the independent panel - set up last year to rule on allegations about MPs' behaviour - being brought in to decide on sanctions.

The panel's chair, Sir Stephen Irwin, said Mr Vaz's bullying "was hostile, sustained, harmful and unworthy of a Member of Parliament", adding "he should be ashamed of his behaviour".

Bullying claims
image captionJenny McCullough worked at the Commons from 2002 to 2011

On a trip to Russia in 2008, the report said Mr Vaz insisted on taking a member of his own staff against advice and told Ms McCullough this was because she was "not competent".

Mr Vaz then threatened to take photos of her drinking alcohol and show them to her manager.

The report said there was evidence the photos were taken and "the implication of the threat was that she was liable to drink to excess so as to affect her performance".

The panel found "there was no substance to this" and deemed it a "psychological threat".

On the same trip, Mr Vaz accused her of not being able to do her job effectively because she "wasn't a mother" and forced her to reveal her age in order to undermine her performance.

Ms McCullough moved to a different team following the trip. Mr Vaz then told her after a meeting with some prostitutes, that they had "reminded him of" her.

The panel said that if the former Leicester East MP had currently held a Commons pass "it would have been appropriate to remove it" and his eligibility for one "should never be restored".

'Riddled with flaws'

Former MPs are entitled to keep their pass to the Parliamentary estate - but Mr Vaz had his taken off him after a separate breach of the Commons code of conduct.

The panel also rejected claims from Mr Vaz's medical adviser that he was too ill to participate in its inquiry, after reviewing "publicly available material demonstrating his ongoing public media and political activity".

In a statement, a source close to Mr Vaz said: "He has never seen the report, nor has he had the chance to question any witnesses or provide a response."

He rejected the panel's claim that Mr Vaz had refused to cooperate with them, saying the former MP had been told he was no longer required to take part and an interview that had been due to take place at his home was cancelled.

"The Parliamentary Commissioner, Kathryn Stone, gave the complainant the right of appeal but failed to offer Mr Vaz the same right which is a fundamental breach of the process leaving the decision open to judicial review," the source added.

"This is a deeply fractured process which has cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds. The total overall cost now stands at £1m."

He claimed Parliament's complaints and grievance process was "riddled with flaws", adding: "As a direct result of the protracted and debilitating process, Mr Vaz was diagnosed with Bell's Palsy for which he was hospitalised and for which he is still undergoing treatment. This matter is now in the hands of solicitors."

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-58661931

 

Sabina Nessa killing: Met Police investigate stranger attack theory

Published
2 hours ago
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Sabina NessaIMAGE SOURCE,MET POLICE
image captionSabina Nessa was found near the One Space community centre in Kidbrooke

Police are investigating whether Sabina Nessa was killed by a stranger as she walked to meet a friend at a pub.

The body of the 28-year-old teacher was found by a member of the public in Cator Park, Kidbrooke, south-east London, on 18 September.

Officers believe she was attacked shortly after leaving her Astell Road home at about 20:30 BST last Friday.

Speaking at a press conference, Det Ch Supt Trevor Lawry said: "The streets are safe for women."

He added: "People should be free to walk around free from fear and officers are here to make sure that can take place."

Asked whether police believe Ms Nessa was attacked by a stranger, he said: "That is definitely a line of inquiry that we are looking at."

A man in his 40s was who arrested on suspicion of murder the day after Ms Nessa's body was found was later released under further investigation.

media caption"The streets are safe for women" – Det Ch Supt Trevor Lawry speaks to reporters

The police press conference was held on the same morning London mayor Sadiq Khan said violence against women was a national "epidemic".

Appearing on ITV's Good Morning Britain, he said: "Between last year's International Women's Day and this year's International Women's Day, 180 women were killed at the hands of men across the country.

"We do have an epidemic when it comes to violence against women and girls."

He called for violence against women to be treated with the same level of priority as counter-terrorism.

Map of Sabina Nessa route

Police have not yet established a motive for the attack on Ms Nessa, although they do not believe the killing is linked to any other incident in the area.

A post-mortem examination into the cause of the 28-year-old's death was inconclusive, the Met said.

Asked for any details about how Ms Nessa died, Det Ch Supt Lawry said he could not release any information "at this time".

Forensic officers searching near the scene where Sabina Nessa was found
image captionOfficers searching near where the 28-year-old teacher was found

Ms Nessa was killed on a short walk to meet a friend at The Depot bar.

The five-minute journey to the pub would have taken the teacher through Cator Park, near where her body was found.

Ms Nessa's sister paid tribute to the "beautiful, talented and caring" teacher on social media.

"Never in my life did I or my sisters or my mum or dad think this could happen to us," she said.

A vigil is due to be held in Ms Nessa's memory on Friday evening.

The gathering is being organised by a Kidbrooke community group with the support of Reclaim the Streets, which held a vigil for murder victim Sarah Everard in Clapham Common that ended in mass arrests.

Police said they would be part of the vigil on Friday.

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