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It literally looks like those apocalyptic movies, but its real!    Its sad, I feel for these people  ...      Is this what the future will look like ?    the more we go into Kalyug.

 

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On 4/19/2021 at 4:23 AM, Premi5 said:

There's similar or worse in many 'third world' countries including India

True. That's home of the liberty bell though and in what is supposed to be the first world. Be nice if we lived up to that. And helped everyone else enjoy that same status. 

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We sometimes forget how lucky we are! 

Just today, a Pakistani guy who I went to school with, is now on drugs and he approached me asking me if I have any spare change. He looked mentally unstable, but still recognised me        Really sad ...   

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39 minutes ago, puzzled said:

We sometimes forget how lucky we are! 

Just today, a Pakistani guy who I went to school with, is now on drugs and he approached me asking me if I have any spare change. He looked mentally unstable, but still recognised me        Really sad ...   

I am from cali, and at least a third of kids here are stoners

I know a guy who often ties a pagg to school (sometimes a simple pendu parna) and I have caught him vaping some times in the bathroom 

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17 hours ago, NaamTiharoJoJape said:

I am from cali, and at least a third of kids here are stoners

I know a guy who often ties a pagg to school (sometimes a simple pendu parna) and I have caught him vaping some times in the bathroom 

In India there is a temple in Kerala called Sabiramala where the diety Lord Ayyappa resides. Every year there is a 41 day pilgrimage when only men are mostly allowed. This involves a rigorous schedule of fasting praying etc. No alcohol sex or drugs are allowed. Many have reported being cured from their addictions having gone through this ritual. 

Perhaps a similar festival could be considered to alleviate the drink/drug problems within the community. 

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On 4/21/2021 at 7:33 AM, Suchi said:

In India there is a temple in Kerala called Sabiramala where the diety Lord Ayyappa resides. Every year there is a 41 day pilgrimage when only men are mostly allowed. This involves a rigorous schedule of fasting praying etc. No alcohol sex or drugs are allowed. Many have reported being cured from their addictions having gone through this ritual. 

Perhaps a similar festival could be considered to alleviate the drink/drug problems within the community. 

Sikhs does not believe in such fasting thing or praying for certain number of days. This is what our guru sahib ji taught us to be away from such rituals. Our gurbani teaches us how to be in chardikala state 24/7. Our nitenem and daily schedule of amrit vela is the cure of everything. Yes, our folks are not following it but they should and that is the only way in our dharam to be free from social evils. 

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On 4/22/2021 at 11:07 PM, S1ngh said:

Sikhs does not believe in such fasting thing or praying for certain number of days. This is what our guru sahib ji taught us to be away from such rituals. Our gurbani teaches us how to be in chardikala state 24/7. Our nitenem and daily schedule of amrit vela is the cure of everything. Yes, our folks are not following it but they should and that is the only way in our dharam to be free from social evils. 

Religion is there to help us in our spiritual development. We are not supposed to blindly follow it, otherwise how would Sikhism exist in the first place.

Arya Samajis are told not to do idol worship and if I had not done it I would not have learned its positive benefits. 

Luckily my father always said we should experiment and experience ourselves as Gandhi advised. He ate a piece of steak in front of me to say he can eat it but he doesn't want to eat it. My mother would not even eat beef flavoured crisps though they do not have beef in them.  My father was an occasional drinker but one day said he will not drink anymore and never did after that day to the day he died more than 20 years later.

So if someone is suffering badly they should be able to use their discretion to find a solution to their problems. 

With your comments they are currently being left to rot. 

I do not believe Sikhism was ever meant to force people into such a mindset. 

 

 

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On 4/24/2021 at 4:03 AM, Suchi said:

Religion is there to help us in our spiritual development. We are not supposed to blindly follow it, otherwise how would Sikhism exist in the first place.

Arya Samajis are told not to do idol worship and if I had not done it I would not have learned its positive benefits. 

Luckily my father always said we should experiment and experience ourselves as Gandhi advised. He ate a piece of steak in front of me to say he can eat it but he doesn't want to eat it. My mother would not even eat beef flavoured crisps though they do not have beef in them.  My father was an occasional drinker but one day said he will not drink anymore and never did after that day to the day he died more than 20 years later.

So if someone is suffering badly they should be able to use their discretion to find a solution to their problems. 

With your comments they are currently being left to rot. 

I do not believe Sikhism was ever meant to force people into such a mindset. 

 

 

I respect your religion as it is and you also need to respect other dharam. Sikhs are known to be very welcoming and it would be nice if folks out there stop taking advantage of that. It would be better idea if you will start your journey to find a HinduSangat forum. 

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On 4/21/2021 at 7:33 AM, Suchi said:

In India there is a temple in Kerala called Sabiramala where the diety Lord Ayyappa resides. Every year there is a 41 day pilgrimage when only men are mostly allowed. This involves a rigorous schedule of fasting praying etc. No alcohol sex or drugs are allowed. Many have reported being cured from their addictions having gone through this ritual. 

Perhaps a similar festival could be considered to alleviate the drink/drug problems within the community. 

I was talking about cali 

It is the most liberal state in US and therefore is liberal when it comes to drugs as well lol 

And I'm sure bani can cure any rog that inflicts me or others willing to follow sikhi 

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On 4/24/2021 at 4:03 AM, Suchi said:

Religion is there to help us in our spiritual development. We are not supposed to blindly follow it, otherwise how would Sikhism exist in the first place.

Arya Samajis are told not to do idol worship and if I had not done it I would not have learned its positive benefits. 

Luckily my father always said we should experiment and experience ourselves as Gandhi advised. He ate a piece of steak in front of me to say he can eat it but he doesn't want to eat it. My mother would not even eat beef flavoured crisps though they do not have beef in them.  My father was an occasional drinker but one day said he will not drink anymore and never did after that day to the day he died more than 20 years later.

So if someone is suffering badly they should be able to use their discretion to find a solution to their problems. 

With your comments they are currently being left to rot. 

I do not believe Sikhism was ever meant to force people into such a mindset. 

 

 

If you do not wish to follow a religion, then why be in a platform based off of religion entirely dedicated to the theological discourse of that religion 

folks here on sikhsangat strive to follow sikhi to the max they can and implement it into their life as much as possible, so all this "experimenting" isn't in our Guru's hukam and most of us abide by that and you must understand/respect that

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I think that what @Suchi is trying to do is give his 2 cents but it is important for him to know that Guru Sahib has always a reason behind his hukam. So while I respect your view on experimenting for yourself, I don't think we should break rehit and if we want to become a Gurmukh, we have to follow the Guru's way of thinking. We as Sikhs surrender to Guru Sahib and Akal Purakh.

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7 hours ago, S1ngh said:

I respect your religion as it is and you also need to respect other dharam. Sikhs are known to be very welcoming and it would be nice if folks out there stop taking advantage of that. It would be better idea if you will start your journey to find a HinduSangat forum. 

Sure I know Sikhs are welcoming. But I would say Hindus are more so. We have Sikhs in our family. Others family members follow Radha Soamis who dress like Sikhs.

Being from Punjab I feel we should try to understand each other more especially as I see alot of anti Hindu comments on here regularly. Perhaps that is political. I'm trying to get to the bottom of it as I don't believe it is constructive. 

I was stopped from going to the Punjab for many years as I couldn't get a visa to enter my own city/ state due to terrorist activities.

I'm trying to understand more about Sikhism as I was brought up to believe it was the same as Hinduism hence in there being no problem in marriages from our side. 

Now reading your scriptures I can see there is hardly any difference. 

But practices seem to have avered from what was originally intended and meant. 

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6 hours ago, NaamTiharoJoJape said:

If you do not wish to follow a religion, then why be in a platform based off of religion entirely dedicated to the theological discourse of that religion 

folks here on sikhsangat strive to follow sikhi to the max they can and implement it into their life as much as possible, so all this "experimenting" isn't in our Guru's hukam and most of us abide by that and you must understand/respect that

I follow spirituality. Luckily my religion asks me to use my discretion mind and experiences to develop spirituality. It does not require me to follow a rigid set of rules unless I accept them and make them mine. 

I am interested in your comment about experimenting not being allowed. Can you refer me to scriptures on that?  Thanks. 

 

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14 hours ago, intrigued said:

I think that what @Suchi is trying to do is give his 2 cents but it is important for him to know that Guru Sahib has always a reason behind his hukam. So while I respect your view on experimenting for yourself, I don't think we should break rehit and if we want to become a Gurmukh, we have to follow the Guru's way of thinking. We as Sikhs surrender to Guru Sahib and Akal Purakh.

Sure. But I recently came across a video with BoS ...... 

 

Mod note DELETED. 

 

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