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How to deal with death


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I was 9 when my immediate family member passed away. That’s how the spiritual urge started. Might share more another time.. anyway a few points; - when do happy people remember god? People only r

I understand what you are saying. You can ask her in your mind or out loud and wait for a sign.  After my mother died I kept wondering about her though I had many dreams. But during the last one

I have lost people in my life close to me. The feeling you have is emptiness.  The person filled a gap in your life which is missing.  In the modern world, we think of death of being se

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3 hours ago, Redoptics said:

I miss my wife, how do you deal with death 

I miss my best pal. I was desolate when he passed away for quite a while (a few years!). Time (I found) does heal and attenuate the intensity of pain. 

The busier you keep yourself, and thus from thinking about it, the better. You can't be stuck in constant grieving mode. The grief is heavily psychological, and you have to use a variety of tricks to focus elsewhere. Training helps. Keeping busy (as mentioned previously) helps. Hobbies help. Supportive friends who don't indulge you in excessive emotionality help. If you're going to mope about it for years, then you're not doing yourself any favours. You have to want to get over it, and not indulge in excessive emotionality after a while. 

Even then, something will happen that brings them back to mind. But you have to keep moving. When the sun's out I always remember him, and what we'd get up to. I go past a place we used to go to (like a restaurant) and up he pops in my mind.

But he's gone somewhere else now, and I'm here, and I have to deal with my own issues now. You have to be tough minded. 

Try CBD btw.  

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41 minutes ago, Kau89r8 said:

No matter how much you are hurt and in pain, i know nothing will bring your wife back..she loved you and would want the best for you. Would she be okay to see you in this state today. She will always be a part of you and that can never change. 

I know easier said then done, try to see we will all leave one day. My days could be numbered. Make most of each day, imagine its you last day, can you look back and say you'd have no regrets? How would your wife want you to live. She would want to see you happy and live your life to the fullest. 

Grief never ends. Where there is deep grief, there is great love.

Waheguru 💔

 

Well quantum physics says different 

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14 hours ago, Suchi said:

If you're able, I suggest you do some charity work, maybe helping the homeless for example. Seeing people worse off than yourself may help you stop thinking about your own problems.  

 

Already pay to oxfam, in here name,  I just need to know she, is ok , I hope u make sense 

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