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Sidhu Moosewala joins Congress party


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Our lot are very foolish. The only thing they love being proud of is being an alcoholic and doing bhangra. Nothing else. Will run over their own to get clicks and likes from others. Just keep giving f

Omg this is so pathetic. If our politicians are people like Sidhu Moosewala, of course the state of Punjab is not looking well. I’m actually cringing right now. Anything for votes, seriously? Lol this

Honestly im hoping for china to invade india soon lol.

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12 hours ago, GurjantGnostic said:

He said what? <banned word filter activated> Moosedrool. Lol. What a poser. 

 

Navjot Sidhu to clarify* 

Sidhu went from bowing down to Sant Ji to licking gandhis boots lol 

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20 minutes ago, Jacfsing2 said:

The thing about it is, is we don’t need everyone to be hardcore religious, but rather we need everyone to be loyal to the faith and the community as a whole. Jinnah was a cigarette-loving and pork-loving Muslim guy, but he still came for his Panth on issues he felt were important at the time. Whether some Sikhs end up weaker on the scale of religiosity is less of a problem when compared to politics, we can talk quality over quantity anyday in a spiritual setting, but on a global scale, such things will only push those weak in their faith, but willing to assist us in other ways. 

There's no such thing as loyalty in politics. It's all about getting and retaining power. As without power it is difficult to implement policies you need or want. 

And about Jinnah, you're wrong there. He was a British stooge forced to lead the Muslim League and was dragged from his plush Hampstead lifestyle to do so, in 1933. The fact he managed to do it without detection is testimony to what the media can pull off as they operate on certain agendas they are paid to support. So all actors really. 

 

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9 hours ago, Kau89r8 said:

 hindus brahmins south indians gujjis compared to us Punjabi  Sikhs in India and in West..they dominating banks, science, med, business, top forbes lists etc...

I don't know if you've watched the latest Russel Peters special (the one set in Mumbai) he says as much at the end. He thinks the southerners are more intelligent than the northerners.  

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22 hours ago, proudkaur21 said:

e not these rich so called city sikhs who live to end sikhi in their families by trying to assimilate in the cities because they think sikhi is backward.

I think that's too crude. Not all noncity Sikhs are loyal to Sikhi, plenty will do anything to get ahead. And not all city Sikhs are sell outs. 

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7 hours ago, Jacfsing2 said:

The thing about it is, is we don’t need everyone to be hardcore religious, but rather we need everyone to be loyal to the faith and the community as a whole. Jinnah was a cigarette-loving and pork-loving Muslim guy, but he still came for his Panth on issues he felt were important at the time. Whether some Sikhs end up weaker on the scale of religiosity is less of a problem when compared to politics, we can talk quality over quantity anyday in a spiritual setting, but on a global scale, such things will only push those weak in their faith, but willing to assist us in other ways. 

Good points here.

I'll add the following: we have a fatal flaw in the mindset of those who consider themselves practising or above averagely religious. There's a considerable amount of gatekeeping on the part of these types of people who demand that anyone who wants to speak on Sikh issues or advocate for even positive things needs to be Sant Jarnail Singh 2.0.

Thing is they don't just alienate well meaning Sikhs but go out of their way to antagonise and make enemies of their own people. Congratulations, you've just alienated 99.9% of Sikhs who would otherwise have worked for collective Sikh interests. I'm certain there's a certain provincial protectiveness or jealousy aspect at play, too. So what you get is someone who has dardh for his history and his people thinks, "F**k it, I'll go where I'm not presided over by a bunch of illiterate pendus with zero ideas." Brain drain of sorts which leaves mostly thickos in charge.

The problem for us in the future will be the hardcore Western Punjabi Communist types (crudely referred to as SJWs) who are pushing for things like gay Anand Karaj's, and various other deviant behaviours, etc. The respectful Punjabis stepped back quietly when it was made clear their input wasn't valued. The Marx-influenced Sikhs have no such scruples. When their ideology will achieve complete global cultural victory (I'm guessing within 20 years), these orthodox gatekeepers won't be able to intimidate or force these types of Punjabis out of anywhere. The weirdo Sikhs who post leftist bukwaas on Twitter will infiltrate real life. Then we're truly in the doo-doo.

Jews learned this lesson thousands of years ago and... well, look at the world today and see how well they've done.

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27 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

Good points here.

I'll add the following: we have a fatal flaw in the mindset of those who consider themselves practising or above averagely religious. There's a considerable amount of gatekeeping on the part of these types of people who demand that anyone who wants to speak on Sikh issues or advocate for even positive things needs to be Sant Jarnail Singh 2.0.

Thing is they don't just alienate well meaning Sikhs but go out of their way to antagonise and make enemies of their own people. Congratulations, you've just alienated 99.9% of Sikhs who would otherwise have worked for collective Sikh interests. I'm certain there's a certain provincial protectiveness or jealousy aspect at play, too. So what you get is someone who has dardh for his history and his people thinks, "F**k it, I'll go where I'm not presided over by a bunch of illiterate pendus with zero ideas." Brain drain of sorts which leaves mostly thickos in charge.

The problem for us in the future will be the hardcore Western Punjabi Communist types (crudely referred to as SJWs) who are pushing for things like gay Anand Karaj's, and various other deviant behaviours, etc. The respectful Punjabis stepped back quietly when it was made clear their input wasn't valued. The Marx-influenced Sikhs have no such scruples. When their ideology will achieve complete global cultural victory (I'm guessing within 20 years), these orthodox gatekeepers won't be able to intimidate or force these types of Punjabis out of anywhere. The weirdo Sikhs who post leftist bukwaas on Twitter will infiltrate real life. Then we're truly in the doo-doo.

Jews learned this lesson thousands of years ago and... well, look at the world today and see how well they've done.

What you have mentioned here is very important.

By alienating well meaning Sikhs (the silent majority) this has allowed a vacuum for the SJW Sikhs to fill the space. It's an own goal.

They are ones who are dictating the direction and they need to be dismantled somehow before they become further entrenched. It is from the inaction from the rest of us that is allowing this to happen.

If you notice that last few threads we have become to identify this particular liberal SJW cultural marxist type of Sikh as a menace within.

Part of this problem we cannot control because it is part of a wider malaise that is impacting many non Sikhs as well. Something needs to change or the pendulum will need to swing.

But when that change happens it will happen.

Which then leaves us back to what we have control over.

 

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38 minutes ago, Ranjeet01 said:

What you have mentioned here is very important.

By alienating well meaning Sikhs (the silent majority) this has allowed a vacuum for the SJW Sikhs to fill the space. It's an own goal.

They are ones who are dictating the direction and they need to be dismantled somehow before they become further entrenched. It is from the inaction from the rest of us that is allowing this to happen.

If you notice that last few threads we have become to identify this particular liberal SJW cultural marxist type of Sikh as a menace within.

Part of this problem we cannot control because it is part of a wider malaise that is impacting many non Sikhs as well. Something needs to change or the pendulum will need to swing.

But when that change happens it will happen.

Which then leaves us back to what we have control over.

 

Ultimately it boils down to the fact that anyone with anakh and a handle on their own worth and capabilities will not allow themselves to be treated like dirt when the intention is to improve and uplift. Some of this group will fade into the background either heartbroken or quietly resentful. A minority will, however, cultivate grudges and join the "enemy" out of anger. The world is not as small as it once was in terms of outlook, philosophies, and potential avenues of interest. If talented individuals find no place in their own people, there's no shortage of other groups who will be more than happy to claim these people for their own purposes. 

 

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1 minute ago, Kau89r8 said:

You should respond every time and repeatedly "I am a Sikh" until everyone knows what a Sikh is. 

Unless..

You are about to fight someone else's hate crime on purpose. Then yes you can be whoever they have a problem with. I've been a few things I wasn't before. 

But no, in general we should correct people 100 percent of the time, and no it isn't anyphobic. 

I mean they catch you doing a crime and somebody points and says get that christian, go ahead and run without correcting them I guess but no, in general, correct everybody. 

How is calling a dude who identifies as a chick a dude on accident rude but nobody has to identify our Spirituality right? Nuh uh. 

I'm a Sikh. On repeat. 

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If you're trying to be interfaith you should still say No, I'm a Sikh, why?, You have problems with muslims? Then hash it out. Be ready to corner step and counterstrike, people love to walk up too close, get loud then try and sneak that sucker punch in. If it lands, they have a chance to keep landing and even if it misses, if you lose your balance, they still get to land all the other blows. 

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