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Do You Judge People By Their Pagh/dastaar?


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Do You Jugde People By Their Pagh/Dastaar?

I've found that quite a few Singhs/Kaurs instantly judge someone by the style of pagh they wear.Personally I highly respect anyone that ties a pagh as it shows their pride in sikhi and confidence to stand out in a crowd.

Well I moved to Leeds for Uni 6 weeks ago, and a few days ago I was walking round Corn Exchange and there was a Mr Singh on a stall selling kirpane, Kare etc. I saw him and i get well happy when i see another Mr Singh.

I think i should state that he was wearing a dhumalla (to me i dont really care what style pagh someone wears) and i was wearing an african style pagh.

So, I walked up to him and was gonna have a lovely chat with him. He looked up at me and looked backed down. So i said to him "satsriakaal Paaji" to him. He looked up and said, "Theirs nothing for you here". I was well taken a back with that comment, and he refused to sell me this sarbloh Karra that he had for sale there, and he wouldnt tell me why he wouldnt sell it to me.

I dont know why but i got the feeling it was because of the style pagh i tied. So the next day i tied a Patiala Shai Pagh, and approached him again, he didnt recognise me but again refused to sell me a Maala.

I then on the same day tied a dhumalla and went back, and he greeted me with a huge smile and we got into a long converstation, he sold me the karra. And then i told him that i was the other two singhs, he was shocked, he looked ashamed and again wouldn't explain why he wouldn't sell it to me.

Take what you want from this and interperet it how you want. But i see it as people in our community jugde people on their pagh rather than their actions. Its happened to me countless number of times.

Peace n Love

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jab lag khalsa rahay niaraa...

the unique look suit the khalsa! sorry to say this but the kenyan/patiala sahi/indian pug is so associated with khaan peeen it's better to disassociate urself from that look anyway.

im sure the dummalla suited u more anyway... rolleyes.gif

jus my opinion...

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The kenyan turban has an association with boring, conservative middle class wannabes to many people. Plus all that starch makes it look like some type of hardhat.

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The kenyan turban has an association with boring, conservative middle class wannabes to many people. Plus all that starch makes it look like some type of hardhat.

hear hear!

also the malkit singh/daler mehndi turban makes one want to twist the left hand in the motion of changing a light bulb whilst lifting the right leg in an up and down motion!

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i cant believe the kinda responses ive just read man..................Ur dastaar is a crown.......a gift from Guru Gobind Singh Jee and Mata Sahib Kaur......no matter how u tie it..........NEVER FORGET WHAT IT REPRESENTS......................

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The kenyan turban has an association with boring, conservative middle class wannabes to many people. Plus all that starch makes it look like some type of hardhat.
The kenyan turban has an association with boring, conservative middle class wannabes to many people. Plus all that starch makes it look like some type of hardhat.

hear hear!

also the malkit singh/daler mehndi turban makes one want to twist the left hand in the motion of changing a light bulb whilst lifting the right leg in an up and down motion!

i think you two have just proved my point...and i dont starch my pagh, no one i know does. i think thats a bit stereotypical. And a patiala shai pagh is worn by most of the sikh community.

and ye ur right...a dhummalla dont suit me...i just dont like the look of it.

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grin.gif thats a bit dodgy....I tend to judge people by their personality...i dont think thats right...cos like people can be different round their friends n totally different round other people...but i dunno - wat can i say am a witch ;) :cool: :)
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i cant believe the kinda responses ive just read man..................Ur dastaar is a crown.......a gift from Guru Gobind Singh Jee and Mata Sahib Kaur......no matter how u tie it..........NEVER FORGET WHAT IT REPRESENTS......................

hmmm..please quote that to daler mehdi when he is doing his tonak tonak dance...or the uncle getting mashed at the wedding party and then throwing up outside whilst his "dastar" is almost coming off..

truth is it's only a crown for the niara khalsa, for the majorty punjabi men its a rag. so why associate urself with the regular punjabi and his pag, it's not the crown of the khalsa!

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[Mod edit: Please dont use curse words in your posts, post deleted]

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mnhu kusuDw kwlIAw bwhir ictvIAwh ]

manahu kusudhhaa kaaleeaa baahar chittaveeaah ||

Mentally, we are impure and black, but outwardly, we appear white.

rIsw kirh iqnwVIAw jo syvih dru KVIAwh ]

reesaa karih thinaarreeaa jo saevehi dhar kharreeaah ||

We imitate those who stand and serve at the Lord's Door.

This is the kind of stuff that puts me off. Why judge anyone in the first place? You know when I went for my Amrit Sanchaar, I saw a mona paji who didn't look Punjabi. He was probably a non-Punjabi Hindu for all I know, although I am not sure. Guess what sewa he was doing! He cleaned the entire toilet with his own hands, and his little son helped him out. Now how do I judge such a person as "lower" than someone who wears a foot long sri sahib but runs away from sewa? I can't, no one can. I can't do that sewa, but he did it without a frown on his face, and he did it all day long! Judging is not our job. Lets leave that to Dharam Raj. The more we judge people here, the greater the chances are that Dharam Raj would be mad at us for doing his job. Any criteria used to judge a person is just wrong. As the 3HO Sikhs say "If you can't see God in ALL, you can't see God AT ALL".

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You all know there were probably some caste based assumptions going on behind this.

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mnhu kusuDw kwlIAw bwhir ictvIAwh ]

manahu kusudhhaa kaaleeaa baahar chittaveeaah ||

Mentally, we are impure and black, but outwardly, we appear white.

rIsw kirh iqnwVIAw jo syvih dru KVIAwh ]

reesaa karih thinaarreeaa jo saevehi dhar kharreeaah ||

We imitate those who stand and serve at the Lord's Door.

This is the kind of stuff that puts me off. Why judge anyone in the first place? You know when I went for my Amrit Sanchaar, I saw a mona paji who didn't look Punjabi. He was probably a non-Punjabi Hindu for all I know, although I am not sure. Guess what sewa he was doing! He cleaned the entire toilet with his own hands, and his little son helped him out. Now how do I judge such a person as "lower" than someone who wears a foot long sri sahib but runs away from sewa? I can't, no one can. I can't do that sewa, but he did it without a frown on his face, and he did it all day long! Judging is not our job. Lets leave that to Dharam Raj. The more we judge people here, the greater the chances are that Dharam Raj would be mad at us for doing his job. Any criteria used to judge a person is just wrong. As the 3HO Sikhs say "If you can't see God in ALL, you can't see God AT ALL".

Veera,

often u see more sikhi in a gora doing charity work with the disabled then the entire gurdwara congregation on that Sunday morning.

But going back to the types of dastar or look of the person, then Guru Gobind Singh gave us a niara look and a niara personality. Not to be corrupted in anyway and as I see it the Kenyan/Punjabi style pug is now associated with the corrupted male punjabi individual not the khalsa. This is my I observation of what happens around me. Do you really think the likes of badal, daler mehdi, my alcoholic uncle are wearing the crowns of the khalsa. I think not, but at least at this stage we can distinguish their pugs from a dummalla.

in conclusion the style of dastar u wear is a direct reflection of the personality you wish to portray!

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when i used to trim - people thought i didnt know anything about sikhi

when i kept my beard - people thought i knew EVERYTHING about sikhi

lesson: people are a bunch of bandars dont worry about what people think of you care MORE about what Guru Ji thinks of you and your actions :nihungsmile:

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