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The Sikh Revolution by Jagjit Singh


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56 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

So it's only those who can't bear the tribulations of life who seek refuge in the Guru? What of those people who overcome life's cruelties and emerge as stronger people without even knowing the existence of a Guru? Are they now greater than the Guru?

think about it, our Guru is Akal Purakh, and its that taakhat which has helped them even if they do not know  because that is the ONLY power in the universe not us , so NO they are not greater . Guru ji even looks after the aghiratghan/nastiks  because that is Waheguru ji's nature .

I meant because the person said they feel weak ...they should rest their burden with Guru ji and rely on simran/gurbani to change their karams.

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On 2/4/2020 at 4:48 PM, Not2Cool2Argue said:

My own father who taught me these sikhi ideals is a big jatt casteist and a ruthless business man and a badal supporter.

What exactly do you mean by "jatt casteist"? That he whips and kills members of other groups? Or that he married a Jatti (your mother)? There's a big difference between the two.

"Ruthless businessman"? This has been covered in the forum. Just because you are a Sikh does not mean you are required to sell products at the cost you bought them. You shouldn't lie, but you really don't think you're required to run your business at a loss, do you? Search for it, there's a sakhi of I think Bhai Banno that someone quoted.

He's a Badal supporter? Being a Sikh doesn't mean everybody has to agree with you in every respect on politics. If you have a good reason to oppose Badal, why don't you bring them up in a nice way to him?

On 2/4/2020 at 4:48 PM, Not2Cool2Argue said:

I know sikhi was meant to he great. And its teachings are amazing. But what if you just want to be normal? What if ur too weak to follow that path?

Then do what you can. You're not required to be have all of Gurbani memorized plus be a muscled warrior like Baba Deep Singh ji.

It's not all or nothing.

At the very least, you can not steal. You can certainly do that much, can't you?

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On 2/4/2020 at 4:48 PM, Not2Cool2Argue said:

And what if the rest of the world has already implemented all of sikhi ideals leaving the sikhs laughably behind. 

Gurmat is a system of spirituality. It's not just a progressive social ideal.

The entire reason that some of our missionaries hate naam simran and other forms of worship is they think of it as the latter.

The "rest of the world" is actually laughably behind us in spirituality. Don't fall into an inferiority complex.

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6 hours ago, BhForce said:

The "rest of the world" is actually laughably behind us in spirituality. Don't fall into an inferiority complex.

Not really. 

The buddhist are way ahead of us. They are actually providing answers and solutions to ppl suffering from lack of spirituality and materialism.

And now the new age people are into meditation. And with The Secret and such philosophies they have already learned about how powerful the mind is. 

Even hindus are pretty good at the abhyaas of simran at their ashrams.

And us sikhs are using SGGS as a wish granting genie what with all the akhand paaths. And langars are only for relatives and friends etc. We all know the problems. My point is, sikhs as a collective are not anything to be proud of. We act no better than any other religion or athiests out there. Yes we do have some gems in the panth. But that is due to their personal effort. 

Basically, its not the religion that one follows that makes a difference. Its how much an individual puts in the effort. Like what studies show with diet. Its not what diet you follow, but how much you adhere to it, that determines your success. 

So yeah Sikhi is great, but that isnt gonna save me nor the millions of normal panjabi sikhs. And sikhi has great ideals and great history. But once you know it all, have studied it since childhood, and  know it is one of the best religions in terms of its 'philosophies'/teachings compared to the others. Then what?

So far sikhs are just hung up on talking about how great sikhi or sikhs are. Whats next? 

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10 hours ago, BhForce said:

What exactly do you mean by "jatt casteist"? That he whips and kills members of other groups? Or that he married a Jatti (your mother)? There's a big difference between the two.

That the other castes are inferior. Supporting their rights and elevating them will cause choas. That most of the crimes, riots, gang rapes are done by low caste ppl. They have no inhibition and the more free they are of poverty the more chance they have of causim damage.

Where do you think that falls on your spectrum? 

10 hours ago, BhForce said:

"Ruthless businessman"? This has been covered in the forum. Just because you are a Sikh does not mean you are required to sell products at the cost you bought them. You shouldn't lie, but you really don't think you're required to run your business at a loss, do you? Search for it, there's a sakhi of I think Bhai Banno that someone 

 

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@Not2Cool2Argue

You know, I didn't respond to your first post on this thread because it gave me so much to think about, that I couldn't answer it without serious reflection (which I'm still doing) - and I plan to answer as soon as I've structured my thoughts in a way that would make them easier to grasp. 

In the meanwhile, I applaud your straight up honesty, but you might want to delete the last couple of lines of the last post bro???

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Some background on author. I notice the link to the book is gone now. Will try and find new source. 

 

In the Sikh Revolution, Jagjit Singh gloriously places the mission of the Sikh Gurus on the world stage. Drawing from Weberian analysis, Jagjit Singh, for the first time in the English language, masterfully accesses the Sikh oral and textual traditions in a broad defining thesis. His approach and interpretations provide a lucid and well-structured argument that sheds light on many of the Sikhs’ practices and beliefs and provides the historical and social backdrop that gave rise to the Sikh revolution.

Jagjit Singh (1904 - 1997) was a prominent Sikh scholar of the twentieth century. After graduation, Singh began his teaching career as a Lecturer at Sikh National College, Lahore. With the advent of the Indian struggle for freedom, he aligned himself with the Gaddar movement. His spiritual and political mentors included Wasakha Singh and Sohan Singh Bhakna who encouraged him to write Gadar di Lahir (1956) – one of the most authentic and concise accounts of the American led movement for Indian freedom.

Jagjit-Singh.png?1582925938

 

Jagjit Singh’s key writings include The Sikh Revolution (1981), Perspectives of Sikh Studies (1985), Zat Pat te Sikh (1986), In the Caravan of Revolutions (1988) and Dynamics of Sikh Revolution (1999).

Jagjit Singh held a B.S. in Chemistry from Khalsa College, Amritsar and a M.S. in Chemistry from Panjab University, Lahore. He co-founded the Institute of Sikh Studies to advocate sovereign Sikh perspectives in academia.

https://www.sikhri.org/the_sikh_revolution_by_jagjit_singh_thursday_thoughts_2020

 

 

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OP is now updated with a live download link. 

This is one of the author's mentors, the legendary Sohan Singh Bhakna, who exemplified true Sikh independent spirit at a time when hordes of Panjabis were selling their souls to their colonial masters:

Sohan-Singh-Bhakna-The-Man-who-shook-the

 

 

It’s easy to be mistaken by this picture of a gentle, stooped, grandfatherly 95 year-old. He was in fact one of the most feared and dangerous men in British India. So feared was he by the British that, shackled in irons, he was held for 16 years in near solitary confinement 1000kms off the shore of India for fear of the revolution he tried to spark.

This is Sohan Singh Bhakna, founder of the revolutionary Ghadr Party. When India joined WW1, every young Punjabi man was vigorously encouraged to join the Indian Army; British officials, Indian nobility, Indian district bureaucrats, even the Indian National Congress and Mahatma Gandhi joined forces to promote recruitment. Opposing that consensus was a vociferous, violent energetic group, operating from North America called the Ghadrs, or revolutionaries.

Sohan Singh Bhakna became active in the early nationalist movement before he joined the small pioneering stream of men who moved out of Punjab to the Pacific Northwest in the early 1900s where he worked in lumber mills. America wasn’t colonising India but there was no lack of racism and discrimination toward the ‘Hindoo’ labourers and Bhakna rapidly joined the early Indian labour movement.

He founded the Ghadr party with other North American Indians who agitated for the overthrow British colonial authority in India by means of an armed revolution. The Ghadrs viewed the Congress-led Independence movement as soft and unambitious so adopted a harder stance with their principal strategy to entice Indian soldiers into armed revolt against the British taking particular advantage of the vulnerability of the First World War.

Their revolutionary plans included smuggling arms to the passengers of the Komagatu Maru on their return to India, making overtures to the German Embassy in the US, pumping out revolutionary messages to Indian soldiers via their prolific pamphleteering. Their most seditious and dangerous plot was to coordinate violent armed revolutionary activity with Indian soldiers in SE Asia. Alarmed, the British promptly arrested Sohan Singh as he tried to enter India in 1914 and tried for conspiracy.

Found guilty, he was sentenced to death. A sentence later commuted to life imprisonment in The Andaman Islands, 1000kms off the shore of India. There Sohan Singh settled into a period of revolt and activism with repeated hunger strikes to improve the conditions for his fellow prisoners. Both in the Andamans and back in India where he was imprisoned until 1930 he carried out hunger strikes for Sikh prisoner’s religious rights, the rights of lower caste Indian prisoners and in support of Bhagat Singh.

By the outbreak of the Second world war, Sohan Singh had been released 10 years and was an active and fearsome political voice for the Communist Party. War brought new rules, and the Indian Government arrested and interred the now 70-year-old Sohan Singh for 3 more years in an Indian jail lest he revive his violent tendencies during a time of wartime vulnerability.

He lived another 20 years after Indian Independence and the Partition, a constant and prolific voice in early Indian politics. He died in 1968, ending a phenomenal life of 98 years, in his home district of Amritsar.

-Amandeep Madra

https://barusahib.org/general/sohan-singh-bhakna-the-man-who-shook-the-britishers-with-fear/

 

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