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2 minutes ago, jkvlondon said:

i find its the kids from 70s -80s who are more lax parents they want to be fullon goray and look down on anyone from older gen , thatcher's kids they called them back in the day, mumand dad got paise, sikhs got turban and kirpan rights at work and school so things were easier , people started buying homes then doing the whol house flipping thing to up their status , their kids are the ones who are abandoning their elders , raiding the bank of mum and dad ... total losers. will look the part of a sikh perhaps , have attitude if you question them but they know next to nothing.

The Nihangs of that generation were something else, though. They were class. I was lucky enough to do some brief sangat of them as a young kid. Some of them got screwed over by dodgy Punjabans who hit the road after a while, but the Singhs kinda turned their back on the world, and even now are seeing out their days with their bharossa in Guru Sahib. They are barely into their mid-50s now, so it's not as if they're decrepit or anything like that.

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It's because these same kanjars are going to apparently start representing sikhi and do those Khalistan talks.  I don't care what someone says if they're not a sikh, but when they start saying si

Rise above it and get out of here. Only help those who want to be helped. Society is lost, it will only get worse in kaljug. I know someone who posts really tarty and sexual photos on Instagram.

I have a feeling that some of these types are doing this because they feel resentment at having been compelled to reign in their promiscuous behaviour when growing up in a relatively conservative Sikh

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2 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

The Nihangs of that generation were something else, though. They were class. I was lucky enough to do some brief sangat of them as a young kid. Some of them got screwed over by dodgy Punjabans who hit the road after a while, but the Singhs kinda turned their back on the world, and even now are seeing out their days with their bharossa in Guru Sahib. They are barely into their mid-50s now, so it's not as if they're decrepit or anything like that.

know what you mean although I became a latchkey kid mid eighties mum and Dad made up for it by still taking us to rehnsabhai kirtans and programs where the solid gursikhs were of that era everyone was about the panth's chardikala and the sangursh: so blessed . Their kids were a mixed bunch ; remember when they were so strict on rehit when the kid cut his hair , his father refused to have anything to do with him . Harsh but given the level the father was at understandable.

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1 hour ago, dallysingh101 said:

I have to say that that generation bore the greatest brunt of any generation here in my opinion. A lot of which was down to the original immigrants being pretty much oblivious to many issues that were going on under their nose and what you (and others) have mentioned above. Pendu parents and their mentalities in a relatively modern metropolis was always going to be an issue. The differences between back home and here were not going to be negotiated by everyone successfully. 

What it looks like to me is that even though there were lots of fups from that era, there were still bundhay of the calibre that frankly I don't see in subsequent generations. The younger lot will never (hopefully) get to experience the levels of violence that was common back then, especially along racial lines. The level of open police intimidation. The limited resources that accompany being in a blue collar 'working' family. The general contempt that many people quite openly expressed towards brown folks.  And we haven't even spoken about a lot of the backwards thinking amongst our lot - that passes off as our 'culture'. 

So much has changed since then, and I think the cream of that generation helped set trends that subsequent generations have yet to catch up too - or take for granted. In the UK at least.

I mean even the 'Sikhism' that was vaguely promoted back then (and let's be full on frank - Panjabi culture was, and possibly still is, what is perpetuated through the community - over dharam), was shallow and simpleton.  Bani available in English were largely mistranslated, or given some Singh Sabhaesque puerile protestant twist. Even the 'mainstream' accounts of our history were really just manipulations that promoted some infantilised, subservient colonial mindset. Most elders didn't really regularly read or analyse Gurbani and important Sikh texts. The confusion of the blur between 'Panjabi culture' and Sikhi was at an all time high. Many people were pretty much indoctrinated into some balle-balle-shava-shava culture. But somehow, some (despite their own personal problems and the whole circus around them), managed to slowly figure things out (or really with Guru ji's kirpa!), despite hard resistance from both internal and external sources; and they tried to work through all this.  And yes, a few of us have really been up and down this society - from it's darker hidden underbelly to it's projected bright illusion, and we've gained worldly knowledge, experience and understanding that today's (seemingly closeted?)  internet/social media based youngsters will probably never gain - and to be frank, most of you look like you'd crumble pretty quickly if you had to face a few of the things old schoolers did, let alone all of it....   

What people didn't have back then was access to sound information about our true heritage. We've had to fight and claw for that. It's come slowly. Gradually. Often after going into blind alleys and having to find our ways back - and losing people along the way.  For the inquiring and genuinely interested amongst us, getting through all that quagmire and misrepresentation and just starting to see just what a priceless heritage and culture we have (and I mean Sikhi here, not Panjabi culture or whatever caste based bollox I know a lot of you are secretly trying to preserve) has been a profound journey in itself.  

 

 

It's true the current crop of younsters have so much more to help them find their true roots and incidents from our recent history have been uprooted from under the carpet where it was swept by 'leaders' such as longowal and Badal . My Mum was uaware of the attack on Harmandir Sahib in 1955 and the deaths of 200 sikhs and injuries of hundreds more by Nehru directed troops - she said although she lived in Punjab at the time no one in the villages spoke about it .

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Just another note, it is not only the Generation X, it is also the latter end of the Boomer generation that is impacted by this.

It was the latter Boomers were it started from and these aren't always people who came from Punjab. Some of these guys are from East Africa, Singapore/Malaysia. 

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11 minutes ago, Kau89r8 said:

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If she's right, then punjabi men are pretty bad as well.

But seriously, what is wrong with these people, have they got some mental disorder thinking god loves you even though you're a kanjar.

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1 hour ago, Ranjeet01 said:

Just another note, it is not only the Generation X, it is also the latter end of the Boomer generation that is impacted by this.

It was the latter Boomers were it started from and these aren't always people who came from Punjab. Some of these guys are from East Africa, Singapore/Malaysia. 

Yeah all there kids and grandchildren are coconuts! and have no clue about Sikhi or punjab. Most of the younger people iv spoken to cant speak punjabi or speak really broken punjabi with all the words muddled up. But I'm not sure If their parents are coconuts themselves? Coz the parents give me that vibe as well sometimes!   

I think its because they were out of the subcontinent, and living in countries where they weren't going to face consequences for their behaviour. I remember back in the 90s east african punjabi ladies used were short clothes, have haircuts and drink wine,  I'm guessing they did the same in africa because there weren't a concept of traditional sharam or facing consequences like a lady would if she did that in india! 

I think they were already like that in Africa/Malaysia and when they came to the UK they got even worse which has resulted in the present younger generation being really gora-fyed. 

Something went very wrong with them somewhere along the line, I think it was all the way back in africa. 

 

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17 hours ago, puzzled said:

My sister started working in a new place around 3 weeks ago and she said she's struggling to find punjabis to hang out with because majority of the Punjabi females that work there are British born middle aged ladies in their 40s and 50s and their all p1ss heads! Their all divorced and they openly brag on about going out on the weekends and getting drunk and they take their daughters with them! They openly talk about having casual relationships. So my sister said she just hangs out with the Somalians!  

I'm fine with that! I'm not controlling, but I rather her hang out with somalians than middle aged degraded Pubjabi p1ss heads. 

 

I remember a conversation 20 years ago with a friend of mine. Somehow the topic of the UK Sikh community came up.

My friend said (I'm paraphrasing): "They are going on their third generation there. Imagine what the girls are like these days. Their community is going to hell."

 

That was from a conversation that took place 20 years ago!

Now, that statement wasn't 100% correct. I am actually surprised that some young British-born Sikhs are into Sikhi (and in some cases, more into Sikhi than their parents).

 

But here are some things that are VERY common in the British Sikh community that I basically never (or very rarely) saw in the American Sikh community:

 

1. Girls drinking openly at Punjabi wedding receptions and parties

2. Aunties drinking openly at Punjabi wedding receptions and parties

3. Aunties with haircuts

4. Aunties wearing revealing clothing

5. Clean-shaven "babay" (grandfathers)

6. Boys and girls in their 20s or 30s who live with their parents but come and go as they please, going out partying, wearing revealing clothing and getting drunk and coming home in the middle of the night ... and somehow not having to hide any of this from their parents. It seems like this kind of behavior is very widely tolerated.

7. Boys and girls with tattoos

 

 

I could go on and on ...

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21 minutes ago, californiasardar1 said:

 

I remember a conversation 20 years ago with a friend of mine. Somehow the topic of the UK Sikh community came up.

My friend said (I'm paraphrasing): "They are going on their third generation there. Imagine what the girls are like these days. Their community is going to hell."

 

That was from a conversation that took place 20 years ago!

Now, that statement wasn't 100% correct. I am actually surprised that some young British-born Sikhs are into Sikhi (and in some cases, more into Sikhi than their parents).

 

But here are some things that are VERY common in the British Sikh community that I basically never (or very rarely) saw in the American Sikh community:

 

1. Girls drinking openly at Punjabi wedding receptions and parties

2. Aunties drinking openly at Punjabi wedding receptions and parties

3. Aunties with haircuts

4. Aunties wearing revealing clothing

5. Clean-shaven "babay" (grandfathers)

6. Boys and girls in their 20s or 30s who live with their parents but come and go as they please, going out partying, wearing revealing clothing and getting drunk and coming home in the middle of the night ... and somehow not having to hide any of this from their parents. It seems like this kind of behavior is very widely tolerated.

7. Boys and girls with tattoos

 

 

I could go on and on ...

It's interesting that you say this because our impression of North American Sikhs is that with the exception of asylum seekers from the post-'84 years, generally the auntie's and uncles all have a haircut and the kids have lost the plot.

It's true that the drinking culture in the UK Sikh community is crazy but North America has caught up.

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30 minutes ago, DailyMail said:

It's interesting that you say this because our impression of North American Sikhs is that with the exception of asylum seekers from the post-'84 years, generally the auntie's and uncles all have a haircut and the kids have lost the plot.

It's true that the drinking culture in the UK Sikh community is crazy but North America has caught up.

(just to be clear, I'm commenting here on America only ... I don't think my comments necessarily apply to Canada)

The uncles do indeed all have haircuts. But when I was growing up, I basically never saw an auntie with a haircut, regardless of what her husband's practice was. (That is changing a bit now, but seeing aunties with haircuts is still far less common than in the UK, where it is the norm.)

 

My point is that, aside from uncles all having haircuts, the situation was not that different from what one would see in India. Men would drink openly and do stupid things (just as you'd see in India), but women still retained Punjabi cultural traditions in terms of their behavior. Also, "kids" in their 20s and 30s would behave a certain way in front of their parents (not like the UK where they seem to do whatever they want).

This is not to make any sort of statement other than to note how things change in each community depending on how far removed from India they are. When I was growing up, there was virtually no such thing as an American born uncle or auntie (and it's still rather rare today). And there was no community of Sikhs from East Africa or Malaysia who were already westernized. Basically all uncles and aunties grew to adulthood in the pinds of Punjab. Things have already changed a bit from when I was growing up, but it is still far from what one would see in the UK. But give it 10-20 years, and the American Sikh community will be like today's UK Sikh community (probably much worse, to be honest).

 

 

 

By the way, don't get me started on the post-84 asylum seekers. Only a tiny percentage of them were legitimate. Most were monay who couldn't care less about Sikhi but saw an opportunity to move to America.

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