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Sikhs Of West And Punjabi Language - Why Nobody Talk About It?

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West born amritdhari sikhs in majority don't use punjabi as their mother tongue. They can't keep up conversation in punjabi nor they know how to write punjabi. If they don't take immediate steps then it won't be far when our language will be gone from our households.

I have seen examples of other faith who stressed very much on their language (jews) and take extra steps to preserve it.

In india sikh youth feels inferior if they speak punjabi while in west sikh youth never got a chance to learn nor any attempts are being made by parents to preserve em. It is sad to see parents sending their kids to sunday gurdwara school and thinks that it is enough of their parental duty to preserve language that our guru sahib jee created.

How do you feel about this issue?

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West born amritdhari sikhs in majority don't use punjabi as their mother tongue. They can't keep up conversation in punjabi nor they know how to write punjabi. If they don't take immediate steps then it won't be far when our language will be gone from our households.

How do you feel about this issue?

I know we don't use it as mother tongue..but we are here in the west !

Just kidding......!...

It's not as easy as you think and most of us can understand it ok but reading has to be learned by self. As for writing... I am completely lost because it was way too much for me and I thought that I'm never going to write in practice for real am I ?.....so sadly, I have never attempted further to learn to write it.

I don't feel too bad, but trying to teach my kid's is real difficult and especially because we tend to speak english anyway with a few punjabi words thrown into sentences when they help make the sentence statement a little quicker in speech..hunna?

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lucky singh ji, i agree with you that living in west it is tough to preserve our language because of lack of resources available by our community. However, i feel that we should do our best (more than what we can do) to make sure that our future generation got the proper chance to learn punjabi. My dad left punjab when he was in 20's. I was born out of punjab. However, spending 2 years of boarding school in rural side of punjab changed my views a lot.

I am teaching my kid to speak only punjabi words when addressing me/singhni as baebay ji or bapu ji (very tough to do so but im doing it). I started addressing my parents in our original words (though they hated it at first but accepted it). We all know that there was no mom/dad, father/mother etc during khalsa raj time or our guru jees time. i know my kid will speak english in school and with society but inside house we are trying our best to speak our language in original form & preserve it.

However, i find it strange that there are lots of people who don't think writing, reading & speaking punjabi is that important.

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I agree with khalsa 1469!! we need to make sure Punjabi stays alive!

I'm born and bred out of India and I can read write and speak Punjabi confidently !

if I can do it anyone can :D

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surely it's ehme ...fifty percent punjabi failed ....aieee

Seriously that's how the Chinese tried to destroy Buddhism they attacked the language first , and how the slaves were subdued by White traders preventing them from speaking their languages. And that is how our future generations are being distanced from original historical information, and increasing their reliance on the gandigi being printed in Hindi text and English by SGPC and RSS

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Blame it on the parents who have no time to teach Punjabi to their children.

veer some parents have limited colloqiual panjabi but know gurbani and arth of the panjabi used there , whatever they have they are passing on is that the best start ?

I would love to learn more but I feel that what is useful in day to day is limited help as people don't speak so eloquently in Panjabi these days ...would love to be able to speak my beautiful maa boli to the fullest extent and stomp out those people's opinions that it's the language of ujard lok

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Sikhs are so small of a minority, that they really won't use it in their lives. My family members have forgotten the Punjabi outside of gurbani, and don't write it on a daily basis. Punjabi people are also a small minority outside of some really special places. (I personally don't meet Sikh people on a daily basis and am usually the only one in a crowd).

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The best way to teach punjabi to your children is to speak punjabi with them. Then when they communicate with you they should also speak punjabi. You can send them to the punjabi classes at the gurdwara all you want but if they come home and you speak English with them then they will not learn punjabi. To learn any language, person to person communication is crucial.

Yes, but if you live in an area where there are no Punjabi people, it seems like a lost cause, why bother learning Punjabi if it has no use in our daily lives?
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Sikhs are so small of a minority, that they really won't use it in their lives. My family members have forgotten the Punjabi outside of gurbani, and don't write it on a daily basis. Punjabi people are also a small minority outside of some really special places. (I personally don't meet Sikh people on a daily basis and am usually the only one in a crowd).

What a strange logic that because you are in a minority, that you won't use your mother langauage.

Yes, but if you live in an area where there are no Punjabi people, it seems like a lost cause, why bother learning Punjabi if it has no use in our daily lives?

Another illogical reason of not learning your mother language.

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veer some parents have limited colloqiual panjabi but know gurbani and arth of the panjabi used there , whatever they have they are passing on is that the best start ?

I would love to learn more but I feel that what is useful in day to day is limited help as people don't speak so eloquently in Panjabi these days ...would love to be able to speak my beautiful maa boli to the fullest extent and stomp out those people's opinions that it's the language of ujard lok

The reason for those parents having limited colloqiual (whatever that means) Punjabi is because their parents

had no time to teach Punjabi to them.

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What a strange logic that because you are in a minority, that you won't use your mother langauage.

Another illogical reason of not learning your mother language.

The 2 reasons I stated are very true, in India, the Sikhs have started speaking Hindu, they grow up learning Punjabi, but all their friends speak Hindi, all their teachers speak in Hindi, when they find their future spouse, they speak Hindi, and finally they speak Hindi after their married and with their new families. This is a real threat.

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