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JRoudh

Punjabi Language

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jkvlondon it is known as Amritsar officially but everyone that lives there, pronounces it as Ambarsar I am not sure why though.

Not just the people who live there. Every Punjabi, from all over Punjab, pronounces Amritsar as Ambarsar.

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Not just the people who live there. Every Punjabi, from all over Punjab, pronounces Amritsar as Ambarsar.

maybe my childhood isolation showing ....sikh da kam sikna ...Thanks for the extra dimension

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Not just the people who live there. Every Punjabi, from all over Punjab, pronounces Amritsar as Ambarsar.

Yea thats how all the oldies in my fam pronounce it too ive noticed. Kuldeep manak does aswel, in his song, 'agg laake fookh du, london shehr nu", about udham singhs badla.

My mum also says amritdhari as 'ambardhari'.

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Yea thats how all the oldies in my fam pronounce it too ive noticed. Kuldeep manak does aswel, in his song, 'agg laake fookh du, london shehr nu", about udham singhs badla.

My mum also says amritdhari as 'ambardhari'.

ambar means sky

amrit mean without death

amar mean immortal also so has amrit gone through amar to ambar do you think ?

kind of like how 'El Phanta de Castile ' settled in London during King Henry 8 time and the area ended up through mispronounciation to 'Elephant and Castle'?

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ambar means sky

amrit mean without death

amar mean immortal also so has amrit gone through amar to ambar do you think ?

kind of like how 'El Phanta de Castile ' settled in London during King Henry 8 time and the area ended up through mispronounciation to 'Elephant and Castle'?

Na i think its jus pure lazyness n b@stardization of our language tbh. U kno like how we say sabJi instead of sabZi etc.

Didnt know that about elephant castle, cheers. Its like how in ealing u have northolt and southall,which used 2 b called southolt, but changed somehow. Infact now its called sowwwthhaaaall. I heard its got sumink 2 do with those panjabis lol

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Not just the people who live there. Every Punjabi, from all over Punjab, pronounces Amritsar as Ambarsar.

Yes, I remember always finding this confusing when I was younger as everyone I know says Ambarsar . But when I see the spelling online It is always spelled Amritsar I use to think this must be another place ... lol. But then some relatives explained it to me.

It think this to do with the Punjabi Pronunciation/spelling of it and Amritsar is the English version or something like that. To all native Ambarsaris it is second nature but to outsiders they usually pronounce it as Amritsar.

We actually sold 2 of our houses in Ambarsar, but we still got one there still and its always special to go back and see our old house thats been there since over 80 years although it has changed alot since modernising it. What makes it special is that the Golden temple is so close by also.

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Na i think its jus pure lazyness n b@stardization of our language tbh. U kno like how we say sabJi instead of sabZi etc.

Didnt know that about elephant castle, cheers. Its like how in ealing u have northolt and southall,which used 2 b called southolt, but changed somehow. Infact now its called sowwwthhaaaall. I heard its got sumink 2 do with those panjabis lol

sabji is because we drop the bindi from sabzi just like my Mum saying Jip instead of Zip (evry1 loves that one) Jero instead of Zero ... :biggrin2:

gotta love that Gulabi Punjabi

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To all native Ambarsaris it is second nature but to outsiders they usually pronounce it as Amritsar.

No. I already told you above. All native Punjabi speakers...all over the globe prounounce Amritsar as Ambarsar.

Na i think its jus pure lazyness n b@stardization of our language tbh. U kno like how we say sabJi instead of sabZi etc.

Its not lazyness. The fact is that the letter 'Z' does not exist in everyday native Punjabi speech.

amrit mean without death

Well not literaly. You first have to break down the word. In old Sanscrit the word 'mrit' means death. Like in the English language we put the letters 'un' in front of the word to make the opposite Sanskrit has a literary rule that makes the opposite when you place the letter 'a' in front of a word. So, by definition, amrit means non-death. The lesson here is that we are going through life already dead but it is amrit that will give us life.

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I say ambardhari too and found it hard to adjust to saying amritdhari. And say Ambarsar. I is coz I was so used to th elders saying it. I wouldn't say it's laziness, as I say sabji too. It's whatever u been brought up to say. I never hears pind people say sabzi. It's city people that say that. Pind punjabi and city punjabi are different.

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I say ambardhari too and found it hard to adjust to saying amritdhari. And say Ambarsar. I is coz I was so used to th elders saying it. I wouldn't say it's laziness, as I say sabji too. It's whatever u been brought up to say. I never hears pind people say sabzi. It's city people that say that. Pind punjabi and city punjabi are different.

ik chotti bindi makes a big difference ...you wouldn't want to make that mistake when reading Jaap Sahib or other Dasam bani :biggrin2:

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Amritsar for Sikhs and Ambarsar for crude, backward Punjabis.

No. Apart for the city folk, who have been heavily influenced by Hindi, normal native Punjabi speakers pronounce it as Ambarsar.

If you listen to Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindrawale's speeches he too used to pronunce it as Ambarsar. Are you suggesting he too was not a Sikh ?

Its like how in ealing u have northolt and southall,which used 2 b called southolt, but changed somehow. Infact now its called sowwwthhaaaall. I heard its got sumink 2 do with those panjabis lol

Its really funny you should say that because its actually true for the town just 2 miles south of Southall : Hounslow. When I was a kid I used to criticise my elders for pronouncing it 'Hunslaw'.

It was only as I got older that I learned that it was we, the British born, who were wrong, because over time we corrupted the original saxon name for the town which was 'Hundslawe' and started pronouncing it Hounslow, which I suppose is somewhat grammaticay correct because over time the English word Hund has transformed into Hound etc. But still, I say give 100% respect to the Punjabi elders who (unknowingly) started pronouncing the word exactly as it was mentioned in the Doomesday Book of the year 1086.

The lesson here is never, ever underestimate the knowledge of a Punjabi farmer. :cool2:

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Id rather be a backwards than a ahankari show off know it all not. By saying that u are putting down all our elders that worked so hard for us. Jagsaw Singh paji agree with u totally, u know wat ur on about, good knowledge.

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Amritsar for Sikhs and Ambarsar for crude, backward Punjabis.

Yes, that is a valid point. As dutiful Sikhs we should make it a point to pronounce it using it's proper name as our Guru Sahib Jee had intended. Amritsar is our holiest city. No trip to Punjab is complete without a visit to Amritsar.

Although Pendu Punjabi is the purest of Punjabi but sometimes Pendu Punjabi does not equate to proper Gurmukhi Punjabi. Not too long ago many people from the villages used to do Ucharan of Vaheguru as BahaGuru. My Grandmother used to say this like this too.

Gurmukhi words should be pronounced properly

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So y did people from there also say Ambarsar? Ambarsar is different form of pronunciation. It's not a slander word, how some people are making out. Ambarsar means Pool of Ambrosia. It was also called Ramdaspur.

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